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We started importing a great chocolate and there are many good Mexican chocolates out there (oK, a few) like Mayordomo. WHat's the best way to make this drink. My memory from Mexican visits is that's it's a thickish drink, almost a gruel, with masa and chocolate. I just received the book Muy Bueno, which makes all sorts of claims about authenticity and traditionalism (danger signs, in my mind) and the recipe for champurrado is almost like a thinner than thin chocolate milk.

What is the way to make it from somewhere like Oaxaca or Chiapas?

(This book is pretty and well-intentioned but it's really about Mexicano-American food from a Texas family. It's not Tex Mex, it's close to Norteño but it's not all that interesting or essential. The thin champurrado and the fact that the chiles aren't toasted makes me not want to explore the rest of the book much)

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I agree with you that it's supposed to be a thick drink. Here in Los Angeles, we have this bakery/tortillaria/restaurant chain El Gallo Giro. I think it's Michocaon style. Their champurrado is thick, and even has little chunks of corn in it from their masa.

When I make it at home, I just make a slurry of Maseca and use it to thicken the chocolate.

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