Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create an account.

Recommended Posts

We started importing a great chocolate and there are many good Mexican chocolates out there (oK, a few) like Mayordomo. WHat's the best way to make this drink. My memory from Mexican visits is that's it's a thickish drink, almost a gruel, with masa and chocolate. I just received the book Muy Bueno, which makes all sorts of claims about authenticity and traditionalism (danger signs, in my mind) and the recipe for champurrado is almost like a thinner than thin chocolate milk.

What is the way to make it from somewhere like Oaxaca or Chiapas?

(This book is pretty and well-intentioned but it's really about Mexicano-American food from a Texas family. It's not Tex Mex, it's close to Norteño but it's not all that interesting or essential. The thin champurrado and the fact that the chiles aren't toasted makes me not want to explore the rest of the book much)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I agree with you that it's supposed to be a thick drink. Here in Los Angeles, we have this bakery/tortillaria/restaurant chain El Gallo Giro. I think it's Michocaon style. Their champurrado is thick, and even has little chunks of corn in it from their masa.

When I make it at home, I just make a slurry of Maseca and use it to thicken the chocolate.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

  • Similar Content

    • By thepastryincident
      This recipe is a great starter for people getting used to working with chocolate. I use Abuelita Mexican chocolate to add a bit of spice and crunchy. Super delicious and easy to make. 
       
      http://www.thepastryincident.com/hotcocoatruffles.html
       
      Xoxo
      The Pastry Incident
       

    • By Kasia
      ALMOND CUSCUS WITH CRANBERRIES AND PINEAPPLE
       
      I hate getting up in the morning. My household knows that before 8 o'clock I'm unbearable, and because almost every day I wake up much earlier, I tend to be unbearable more frequently than I want. Every extra five minutes of sleep is priceless, so I appreciate a good breakfast that is not too complicated and is quick to prepare.

      Recently, I have been preparing breakfast with groats and flakes. This time I chose cuscus. This product is a cross between pasta and groats, and it doesn't need long to prepare. It is enough to add hot water or milk and leave for a few minutes. I added some fresh pineapple, cranberries and banana. I spiced it up with some hot chili pepper .

      Ingredients (for 2 people)
      125g of cuscus
      400ml of almond milk
      1 tablespoon of honey
      1 teaspoon of vanilla essence
      2 slices of fresh pineapple
      1 teaspoon of minced chili pepper
      150g of fresh cranberries
      2 tablespoons of brown sugar
      1 banana
      4 tablespoons of flaked almonds

      Wash the cranberries and put them into a pot. Add two tablespoons of water and the brown sugar. Boil, stirring gently until the cranberries burst and the sauce has thickened. Boil the almond milk with the vanilla essence. Pour the milk onto the cuscus and leave for 5-7 minutes. Slice the banana and roast the almond flakes. Peel the pineapple and dice it. Mix the pineapple, chili pepper and honey. Add the pineapple to the cuscus and mix it in. Put the mixture into two bowls. Put the cranberries and banana on the top and sprinkle with the almond flakes.

      Enjoy your meal!

    • By Kasia
      LUNCH FROM THE JAR, I.E. LAYERED SALAD IN THE OFFICE
       
      Most of us take lunch boxes to the office. Some lucky people can warm their food up at work The rest have to eat sandwiches. Sandwiches are great, but even if we absolutely love them we could get fed up with them in the end. Regardless of where we work we can save the situation with salads. Every day we can prepare a different one and we have an entirely new lunch. If we also take an attractive dish, we have something that is not only tasty but also glamorous.

      I would like to share with you the recipe for a salad which looks equally as beautiful as it is yummy. The chickpeas and groats make it a satisfying and balanced meal, after which we won't be hungry. I think that if you prepare your lunch in the morning and plan to eat it at lunchtime, we should keep the salad and the dip separately. Otherwise, after a few hours in the jar, we have an unappetising dish with squishy lettuce, which isn't what we want, is it?

      Ingredients (for 2 people)
      1 beetroot
      200g of tinned chickpeas
      100g of bulgur
      1 carrot
      1 fresh green pepper
      4 lettuce leaves
      200g of natural yoghurt
      handful of minced chives
      1 small chili pepper
      salt and pepper

      Clean the beetroot and bake or boil it. Grate the beetroot and carrot. Cut the pepper into thin strips. Boil the bulgur in salty water. Arrange in layers in a jar the beetroot, chickpeas, pepper, bulgur, carrot and lettuce. Dice the chili pepper. Mix the natural yoghurt with the chives and chili pepper. Spice it up with salt and pepper. Add the dip to the salad just before serving.
       
       

    • By SNewman004
      I'm wondering if anyone has any experience with a manual tortilla machine / maker. I am not talking about a tortilla press. This machine basically takes a batch of masa dough that is placed on top, through a roller with a cutter, using a hand crank. The machine will flatten and cut uniform size tortillas. I've been looking at the Monarca brand. The reviews seem to be below average. I'm trying to find ways to shave some labor dollars without sacrificing quality. Our restaurant goes through an average of 300 to 500 tortillas a day depending on business. Thanks for your help!
       

    • By SNewman004
      'Our menu is based on Mexican and Latin American flavors, therefor we can't not have fresh guacamole. We fly through the stuff!! One recipe uses 72 avocados which yields about 20 quarts of guacamole. We go through this amount almost every day. On top of having someone (or a couple of) people pressing fresh tortillas, we are spending a lot of time on this menu item. I can't think of any way to make the guacamole less labor intensive without sacrificing the quality. I have considered table side, or to-order made guac. Any thoughts or ideas? Thanks!
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×