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Almondmeal

"Patisserie" by Christophe Felder

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Just two days ago I received my order for Christophe Felder book ' patisserie'. I was so excited walking out from the post office only to come home to find out that it is written in French! So I went online and hunt around to see of this awesome book actually comes in English version, it does and it will be published on february next year! I pre ordered the English version, but right now I am just picture browsing on the French one. Tee hee

I would highly recommend this book for dessert lovers because of its step by step photos and the amazing stuff and ideas in it. It's pink too!


Edited by Almondmeal (log)

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I have the French version too, and must say it weighs a ton!. I haven't really made anything from it yet, but it's as almondmeal said, a good one for dessert lovers.

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