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stuartlikesstrudel

Miniature eclairs

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Hi everyone,

I'd like to make some eclairs to take to an event with lots of people bringing food - because there'll be a variety of (tasty) stuff I'd like to make my eclairs really small so they're not too filling and people can try them (also I think they'll look cute).

Is there any reason I couldn't pipe out very skinny choux lines and hopefully end up with dainty little puffs? Ideally the final baked size would be about 8 - 10cm long and less than an inch wide... but i'm wondering if they may not expand properly or have a solid shell or something... anyone know?

Cheers,

Stuart

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I actually make mine on the smaller side all the time. The great thing about choux pastry is it can be piped in all different sizes. You just have to be mindful of the baking time.

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It works just fine. I made them for an exam in school, and have served them on catering gigs. Just remember to not fill them until the last minute so they don't get soggy.

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