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Origin of The Term "Gravy" for Tomato Sauce


weinoo
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In another topic discussing Italian food vs. Italian-American food, this came up.

What is the origin of the term "Sunday gravy" for what is essentially a tomato based sauce?

And where did it start?

Mitch Weinstein aka "weinoo"

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My hunch is that it has to to with the colossal amounts of the various meats involved, and the fact that (if I my recollection of this is correct) the the fond that builds up while browning is retained when the pan is deglazed, and makes this pretty meaty, meaty enough to count as gravy.

ETA I found a discussion of the reason for calling it Sunday gravy on the Eat Italian blog, which got me thinking that in Italy, 'sugo', generally used to describe a tomato sauce, is also not uncommonly used to refer to some other sauces (e.g. this Tuscan rabbit sauce: http://www.feudighib...=20111210124555), although gravies as they're understood in English-speaking countries aren't something I recall ever encountering.

Michaela, aka "Mjx"
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Things get 're-arranged'. and the USA being so multi-cultural

.

Our family tale is of a lunch about 1930, an aunt asked. (that is not half past seven, but the year)

'Would you like some more mavy gravis?'

The niece's name was Mavis.....

Martial.2,500 Years ago:

If pale beans bubble for you in a red earthenware pot, you can often decline the dinners of sumptuous hosts.

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My Italian-American friends have always told me that when the immigrants first arrived in the US, they were working hard to learn the language and integrate into society. So they had to call pasta sauce something in English. Some groups chose "sauce" and some chose "gravy," pretty arbitrarily. Naturally, whichever name they chose to call it in English, they traditionally made big pots of it for the Sunday family dinners, and the names stuck.

I don't understand why rappers have to hunch over while they stomp around the stage hollering.  It hurts my back to watch them. On the other hand, I've been thinking that perhaps I should start a rap group here at the Old Folks' Home.  Most of us already walk like that.

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I've been told that its a South Philly term. To me, a gravy connotes a roux-thickened sauce. Which this clearly isn't.

Funny, I was thinking of jus gravies (possibly thickened with a small amount of gelatine), starch-thickened sauces aren't even really on my radar!

To be more specific, to me, a gravy is the sort of thing served on turkey (or perhaps sausage in the South) where some of the fat in the pan that cooked the meat is used to make the roux.... and all the charred bits in the pan are deglazed with the making of the roux. I'm not a big fan of roux-thickened gravy; it is usually too fatty for my taste.

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I don't know why but I've always considered "gravy" as made with meat and "sauce" as made without meat.

 

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Brian: Peter, those are Cheerios.”

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