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Xilimmns

Breakfast! The most important meal of the day (2012)

395 posts in this topic

percyn – sounds like you inherited your love of breakfast, and clearly you continue to do the family tradition proud.

Clean-out-the-fridge chipotle shrimp with eggs. I made a pot of sauce with chipotle in adobo, roasted garlic, tomato, cinnamon, and nutmeg. Most of the sauce went into the fridge for future use, but I cooked chopped-up shrimp in the remaining sauce, scrambled in a couple of eggs, and then added half-and-half and mayo to enrich the sauce and temper the fire.

Topped the shrimp-egg concoction with chipotle guacamole and a dollop of the chipotle sauce.

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I wanted a BLT. But I have celiac disease, having recently been diagnosed, and can't eat the sourdough bread. And I didn't have any lettuce. But I had good locally-greenhouse-raised tomatos. So I sliced one thick, slathered with Hellman's mayo, added a couple strips of bacon, diced, and an over-easy egg.

Voila! A BTB! (Bacon Tomato Breakfast!)

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Don't ask. Eat it.

www.kayatthekeyboard.wordpress.com

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percyn – your pork hash looks delicious!

Xilimmns – I love the idea of serving eggs over crispy polenta (or grits). I must try that sometime!

Kay – bacon, tomato and mayo is the best part of a BLT, anyway (I can always dispense with the lettuce)! That looks divine!

We had company this weekend – a sister and a niece. On Sunday, my parents came over for breakfast.

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Scrambled eggs. Everyone is always bizarrely amazed at how long I take to scramble eggs. Then they remark on how moist and fluffy they are!

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Benton’s bacon.

And a new take on Lois’ Best Coffee Cake:

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This recipe is from Maggie. Now my go-to recipe for coffee cake – whether I’m serving it or gifting it, I have made it numerous times and it never fails. I’ve tried various toppings and additions (tiny wild blueberries and lemon zest were wonderful) and left it plain and either way, it is easy and elegant and special. This time, I decided to use up some peaches I had in the freezer. The night before, I roasted the peaches with some brown sugar until they were tender and gooey and pink and then refrigerated them. I topped the batter with them and baked. I think a hint of almond extract would have been perfect, but Momma is averse to almond flavor, so I left it out this time.

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Kim – that coffee cake looks great!

Slow-scrambled bricklayer’s eggs – with apologies to Diana Kennedy - toasted pasilla de Oaxaca and guajillo chiles, soaked, blended, and fried with white onion and garlic. Queso cotija and oregano added for flavor, and then garnished with more queso and onion.

Pasilla de Oaxaca are smoked like a chipotle, which adds a nice twist.

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Kim, your gorgeous coffee cake shot prompted me to make one, also with peaches but I added some chopped crispy bacon.

It was extremely difficult to limit myself to one (smallish) square!


"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett

My blog:Books,Cooks,Gadgets&Gardening

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Bruce – ghost chile sauce! Mr. Kim had ghost pepper jelly for the first time a few weeks ago (Christmas gift from fellow-chilehead daughter) and is hooked! He’d love to try that omelet.

We are off tomorrow to the Outer Banks for a week to celebrate our 30th wedding anniversary, so no more cooking for me for a while. Breakfast this morning:

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Ham and shallot frittata w/ roasted red pepper. No cheese, I forgot!

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percyn -- incredible eggs....soft with the anchovy, great looking omelet (like the browning for a change), and the scramble with chicken sichuan. Yum!


And I want a table for two and a chicken for eight o'clock.

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Kim, enjoy your trip!

Another omelet for me, this one with hard salami and smoked Gouda. Apparently I lack the patience for slow-scrambled eggs most mornings. English muffin with butter and raspberry preserves.

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Road Food breakfast:

bryants.jpg

I've made three trips to Memphis in past 15 days, and during one of them, I threw my gluten-free diet to the winds (I've found I can do this about once every two weeks without TOO many ill effects) and had breakfast at a little joint in Memphis called Bryant's Breakfast. I say with absolute certainty that these are the best biscuits in the entire world.


Don't ask. Eat it.

www.kayatthekeyboard.wordpress.com

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Nice Butt Bruce (BBQ I mean).

Kim, congratulation on your 30th anniversary!

Kay, those biscuits do look good. If I ever attend Memphis in May, I will add this place to my list of must eats.

Thanks Lochaven.

A few catch-up breakfasts:

I love Sausage Egg McMuffins, but hate how they cook the eggs. So it struck me - why don't I buy it without the egg and top it with my own fried egg - Voila

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Soft Scrambled Egg w/Sichuan Double Cooked Pork (Belly)

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Fried Eggs w/Maple Sausage Links

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Huevos Rancheros

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Edited by percyn (log)

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This morning my daughter mentioned (on Facebook) that she was baking a coffee cake. This prompted me to work up a batch of oatmeal cranberry scones - recipe loosely based on a recipe broadcast on one of America's Test Kitchen (or Cook's Country) programs.

As I use the "lazy" way of incorporating the butter, the process is different.

And I added the dish of homemade clotted cream, just to give it a bit of "finish."

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Scone closeup half.jpg

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The scones are very tender and light.


"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett

My blog:Books,Cooks,Gadgets&Gardening

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Whatever the liquid specified in a recipe, I substitute buttermilk (usually a couple of tablespoons more than in the recipe if it is regular milk.

I melt the butter and mix it with the buttermilk - add a egg, combine these and they will instantly "thicken" to the consistency of soft pudding.

Then I add the dry ingredients, which I have already mixed together, mix just enough so they come together, (I use a Danish dough hook which works beautifully)

Turn the mass out onto a floured board, using a dough scraper, turn it onto itself a few times, shape into a round, pat to about an inch thick and cut into 8 triangles.

Bake at 400° F., for about 18-20 minutes. Less if they are a bit thinner.

That's it.

I don't know why this works, but it does. It's less "fiddly" than cutting the fat into the dry ingredients and one doesn't need a food processor or pastry cutter for that matter.


"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett

My blog:Books,Cooks,Gadgets&Gardening

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Pepper and eggs were made for each other.

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