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Dinner! 2011


ChrisTaylor
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This is the one I usually get. Every year I tell myself that this is the last one, at least for a while but then I get another one every time.

Here is a Heritage Ham source.

http://store.heritagefoodsusa.com/smoked-heritage-ham-bone-in---one-16-lb-roast-p65.aspx

Edited by Norm Matthews (log)
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Oh yum kayb. but I'd need a couple gallons of it for a 15 lb. ham. But the ham is salty. Maybe I can simmer individual slices in apple cider. We get some that was pressed at Louisburg, Ks. that is very good. I have some in the fridge now. Lunch is waiting!

Edited by Norm Matthews (log)
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My Old School New School Meat and Potatos:

Short ribs seasoned with salt and pepper and sous vide at 60C for 72 hours, russet mashed potatos with a bit of white cheddar and a straight demiglace for gravy.

I really wanted to slice the short ribs on an angle for a standing geometric-ish presentation, but the short rib was so tender that I couldn't slice it with my chef knife.

Meat and Potatos.jpg

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If someone is really salty, why not soak it for a little while in water?

It soaked in water at room temperature for about 18 hours, then the water was changed and it simmered in water for 5 hours, then cooled in that liquid for another 15 hours.

After it is cut, it should be reheated in simmering water again but I used apple cider as kayb suggested and it was still rather salty. That is just the nature of country cured ham.

Edited by Norm Matthews (log)
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My first attempt at spit-roasting: a duck seasoned with mostly salt but also garlic powder, onion powder, black pepper and a little bit of chipotle powder.

It wasn't bad. The breasts were medium rare and greasy and salty and smoky and everything else I wanted them to be. The legs needed a few minutes in the oven to be finished off to a palatable level--and even then, I still had big lumps of fat to contend with. Happy enough with it for a first attempt, tho'.

Chris Taylor

Host, eG Forums - ctaylor@egstaff.org

 

I've never met an animal I didn't enjoy with salt and pepper.

Melbourne
Harare, Victoria Falls and some places in between

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mm84321, lovely food. In the Langoustine dish, what is the grated stuff at the left of the plate?

Welcome, Justin Uy. Your dinner looks like good comfort food.

ChrisTaylor, I don't see spit-roasted duck that often. Thumbs up for your first effort.

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Korean-style Grilled Beef Ribs and Leeks (Bulgalbi). The beef was cut flanken-style across the bone, and marinated overnight with garlic, gingerroot, scallions, soy sauce, rice wine, sesame seeds, and chile pepper. No outdoor grill, so I pan-grilled the meat on the stovetop with some baby leeks from my CSA. A side dish of kale (also from my CSA) sauteed with garlic and fresh gingerroot. I blanched the kale before sauteing it, so that the kale would be tender.

The recipe says to have the rib strips cut at 3/8" thick. That's really the ideal cut, since beef ribs can be chewy if they're thicker. I learned this the hard way when I ordered the meat from the butcher, and my meat was closer to an inch rather than a 1/2 inch. I forgot to say! Oh well. The meat tasted very good when grilled with the marinade. In this recipe I used 1 TB grated fresh gingerroot (instead of minced), regular soy sauce (instead of Japanese soy sauce), rice wine instead of dry sherry, and 1 fresh chopped cayenne chile pepper instead of red pepper flakes. The original recipe is available online here:

http://www.cooking.com/Recipes-and-More/recipes/Grilled-Beef-Ribs-and-Leeks-recipe-109.aspx

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Yum djyee 100 I used to own a Korean restaurant andI love Galbi but I never heard it called Bulglabi before. I have heard it called Gwaeji-galbi and the way it is cut in your picture, some Koreans refer to it as LA Galbi because that is the way they found it when they first emigrated to California and could not get it cut between the bones like it was in their homeland.

Edited by Norm Matthews (log)
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Yum djyee 100 I used to own a Korean restaurant andI love Galbi but I never heard it called Bulglabi before.

I've never seen it as Bulgalbi before, only as Galbi, and I had that question in my mind also. However, the recipe gave the name Bulgalbi so I kept it. The source is a 1996 cookbook by Sunset Publishing.

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First try making chorizo at the Philip Mahl Memorial Kitchen.

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Used a recipe for Spanish Chorizo from the New York Times Cook Book, Craig Claiborne 1990. Not Spanish Chorizo that I know but very good for fresh sausage for a first try. Had for dinner with short grain brown rice and a bottle of wine. Had the leftovers for breakfast. I expect we will be doing this again.

The Philip Mahl Community teaching kitchen is now open. Check it out. "Philip Mahl Memorial Kitchen" on Facebook. Website coming soon.

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Char Siu made sous vide with pork tenderloin:

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Served with fried rice that included basmati rice (made in my new Panasonic Fuzzy Logic rice cooker), broccoli, carrots, sweet peppers, leeks and garlic from the CSA, peas, ginger, red pepper flakes, cashews, egg and soy sauce.

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Mark

My eG Food Blog

www.markiscooking.com

My T shirt site: Guy Bling

My NEW Ribs site: BlasphemyRibs.com

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Here's one for Chris Taylor and the start of his smoking adventures; bbq baby back ribs - kinda KC style with a nice sloppy sweet sauce.

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Check out the nice pink smoke ring on them, they were in the smoker for three hours then a couple hours wrapped in the oven with a little apple juice to keep them moist.

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Then something completely different; Ras-el-hanout spiced pigeon breast & confit legs, toffee cumin carrots, giant couscous and lightly curried shallot rings.

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Smoothest chicken liver parfait ever with a brûlée topping, taken from the Heston at Home book. The parfait was just as good as the famous "meat fruit" dish I had at his Dinner restaurant in Knightsbridge, sublime!

20111204d.JPG

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Here's one for Chris Taylor and the start of his smoking adventures; bbq baby back ribs - kinda KC style with a nice sloppy sweet sauce.

20111130b.JPG

Check out the nice pink smoke ring on them, they were in the smoker for three hours then a couple hours wrapped in the oven with a little apple juice to keep them moist.

20111130c.JPG

Then something completely different; Ras-el-hanout spiced pigeon breast & confit legs, toffee cumin carrots, giant couscous and lightly curried shallot rings.

20111204a.JPG

Smoothest chicken liver parfait ever with a brûlée topping, taken from the Heston at Home book. The parfait was just as good as the famous "meat fruit" dish I had at his Dinner restaurant in Knightsbridge, sublime!

20111204d.JPG

Toffee cumin carrots??!! Um yum!

"Experience is something you gain just after you needed it" ....A Wise man

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