Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create a free account.

Sign in to follow this  
Jmahl

Dinner! 2010

Recommended Posts

Simple comfort food. Smoked pork neck, white beans and onions.


Porthos Potwatcher
The Once and Future Cook

;

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Our dinner is at noon and today I made Fried Chickpeas with Chorizo and Spinach a recipe published by Mark Bittman on his blog, 19 February 10. I used 1/4 of his breadcrumb topping.

Fried Chickpeas with Chorizo and Spinach.jpg

As usual, I am seduced by the pictures. We added yogurt to our plates.


Darienne

learn, learn, learn...

Cheers & Chocolates

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Simple weekday dinners

Steak, potatoes and buttered peas

dinner.JPG

Red aabbage Ccasserole

rodekool.JPG

Ridiculously easy banana pudding

075.JPG

Recipe here

In the recipe for for the banana pudding, it calls for self rising flour. What exactly is that ?


edited for grammar & spelling. I do it 95% of my posts so I'll state it here. :)

"I have never developed indigestion from eating my words."-- Winston Churchill

Talk doesn't cook rice. ~ Chinese Proverb

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Steve,

Self-rising flour is found in many supermarkets (I don't know about your country though!). To make your own, you need 1.5 teaspoons of baking powder and 0.5 teaspoon of salt per cup of plain/AP flour.

I did not have self-rising flour at that time so mine was just with plain flour(without the salt and baking powder).


Nyonya in The Netherlands

My Blog- Deliciously Lekker

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've worked out a hybrid grilled/broiled pizza system that seems to yield the best pie I can make with my current arsenal of appliances. This one's topped with basil and garlic infused béchamel, some fennel/white wine/garlic sausage that I made, and parmigiano reggiano. A lot of pizza fundamentalists turn up their noses at béchamel on pizza. I'd never tried it before, and I wasn't in the mood for a red sauce pie, so I gave this combo a go. It's a keeper.


Edited by crowdingthepan (log)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've worked out a hybrid grilled/broiled pizza system that seems to yield the best pie I can make with my current arsenal of appliances. This one's topped with basil and garlic infused béchamel, some fennel/white wine/garlic sausage that I made, and parmigiano reggiano. A lot of pizza fundamentalists turn up their noses at béchamel on pizza. I'd never tried it before, and I wasn't in the mood for a red sauce pie, so I gave this combo a go. It's a keeper.

Fundamentalists boo ya, that pie is great looking.

I made pizza once, tasted good, I do not know why I don't do it more often ?

Instead I buy DiGIorno's rising crust, for 6.99 which feeds four. Maybe its the law of diminishing returns ? How much better is it; taste = work, time and extra cost.

I know one thing though, crowdingthepan and that is no store bought pizza is going is going to closely taste as good as yours.

Béchamel brillant !


Edited by Aloha Steve (log)

edited for grammar & spelling. I do it 95% of my posts so I'll state it here. :)

"I have never developed indigestion from eating my words."-- Winston Churchill

Talk doesn't cook rice. ~ Chinese Proverb

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Last night I did the cover recipe from the April 2010 issue of Bon Appetit--Salmon with Sweet Chili Glaze with Sugar Snap Peas and Greens.

The recipe calls for using pea tendrils for the greens but we don't have a market where I can find them so I substituted watercress. I included the stems of the watercress for texture and added some oyster mushrooms to the mix.

005.JPG

008.JPG

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
005.JPGNew York Strip steak seared on a griddle pan, with risotto and caprese salad from the first locally grown (in a greenhouse) vine-ripened tomatos of the season...and I had to use dried basil as the grocery had no fresh and my herb garden is not yet begun for the summer....

Don't ask. Eat it.

www.kayatthekeyboard.wordpress.com

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Moussaka, made with Eggplant Cutlets, both recipes from Rachel Perlow in eG's Moussaka Cook Off Thread. And Spanakopita, pretty much an amalgam of three recipes, including Claudia Roden, A Book of Middle Easten Food. (Sorry about the fuzzy moussaka. I need both a new camera and a new photographer.)

MOUSSAKA MAR 10.jpgSPANAKOPITA MAR 10.jpg


Darienne

learn, learn, learn...

Cheers & Chocolates

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That's a very vivid picture, DeliciouslyLekker. I really liked your red cabbage, too, and the banana pudding looked tasty. Were you following the Lasagna (eG cook-off 52) thread ?

I like the idea of rice, peas, coconut and curry, mgaretz. And the chicken looked good again. Is this now a game of tandoori chicken tag ? I enjoyed mine the other day and I'm happy that you inspired me to make it again.

Great-looking pizza, crowdingthepan, and salmon, David Ross.

I made another stab at unibonara:

DSCF0096.JPG

Details in the Fish & other seafood topic.


Edited by Blether (log)

QUIET!  People are trying to pontificate.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I wasn't around to observe your previous attempts, Blether. I'm assuming this is carbonara with uni replacing the egg as the creamy component in the dish? Great idea.

Thanks, and sorry you missed it. I put links to the previous Dinner! posts in the post in Fish & Other Seafood that I linked to above. I'll not repeat them here.

Uni - the part we eat - is commonly described as the 'ovary'. I don't know about sexual differentiation in uni, like whether there is any and if there are roe on the one hand and milt on the other, or exactly how it all works, but as the part that produces the eggs, I reckon it's close enough for us to put an argument before the court :smile: Yes, uni in place of egg.

As I've written before, back in the UK I'd be replacing the cured pork with smoked mackerel or kipper or similar. I've been hunting for something suitable here and have now resigned myself to not finding appropriate smoked fish, but going with salted, fatty ones. Which is probably closer to the Italian spirit anyway. Back in the previous posts in this thread, I wrote about my approach to assembling the other flavours.

Uni cream pasta is something you see sometimes. The thought occurred to me spontaneously and I found several recipes when I searched Google. Uni just seems a natural for warming through a cream sauce for pasta: apart from anything else, I find it disappointing if cooked in the piece. I mean, sure, it still tastes good, but not a patch on what it is raw: it seems a waste (I feel similarly about smoked salmon). You lose that melting, diffusing richness. But used to flavour a cream, or warmed but still liquid and creamy in itself ? Great, and indeed it behaves very like egg yolk in that respect.

'Unibonara' seems a natural progression (and not exactly rocket science for someone living in this country) - you can just sense the potential as soon as you think of it.


Edited by Blether (log)

QUIET!  People are trying to pontificate.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

... I need both a new camera and a new photographer.)

:laugh: That made me laugh in recognition - I've posted fuzzier. I still want some of both !


QUIET!  People are trying to pontificate.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That's a very vivid picture, DeliciouslyLekker. I really liked your red cabbage, too, and the banana pudding looked tasty. Were you following the Lasagna (eG cook-off 52) thread ?

Thanks, Blether! I just checked out the Lasagna thread. I've never made my own pasta, to be honest!

The red cabbage schotel is really easy. Most people use a 'mince marinade' but I didn't have it on hand so I use cumin to flavour the meat instead. I bought the 'mince marinade' later but I prefer the cumin version! This is a typical weekday/lazyday dinner. You can of course, make the different components from scratch. If not, just use a large jar of red cabbage+apples and instant mashed potatoes and you're done in less than 10 minutes (not incl. oven time).

I wish I could fine uni here. I love it!


Nyonya in The Netherlands

My Blog- Deliciously Lekker

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

after 4 failed batches of biscuits this week I finally cooked something edible

"mexican" rice, refried beans with cheese, chorizo, and runny fried egg

Mar10.jpg


The great thing about barbeque is that when you get hungry 3 hours later....you can lick your fingers

Maxine

Avoid cutting yourself while slicing vegetables by getting someone else to hold them while you chop away.

"It is the government's fault, they've eaten everything."

My Webpage

garden state motorcyle association

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

after 4 failed batches of biscuits this week I finally cooked something edible

Somehow I feel a strong kinship with rooftop1000. :wink:


Darienne

learn, learn, learn...

Cheers & Chocolates

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Mozzerella, figs roasted with Maple syrup

P1010486.JPG

Chicken wings with morels, fresh peas and crispy chicken skin:

P1010488.JPG

Pork Fillet with a blood orange + green peppercorn sauce, fennel and blood oranges, pomegranate and wilted garlic leaves.

P1010490.JPG


Edited by Matthew Grant (log)

"Why would we want Children? What do they know about food?"

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Rendang (beef braised in coconut milk) over brown rice, with sesame snow peas.

009.JPG


Don't ask. Eat it.

www.kayatthekeyboard.wordpress.com

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I hate to disappoint you (or sound like an arse) but Rendang is a dry dish without any gravy, it can be kept for several weeks (maybe even longer I've never tried), what you have there is more likely Kaliyo which is basically the same dish but without reducing the sauce completely. :smile:


"Why would we want Children? What do they know about food?"

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I hate to disappoint you (or sound like an arse) but Rendang is a dry dish without any gravy, it can be kept for several weeks (maybe even longer I've never tried), what you have there is more likely Kaliyo which is basically the same dish but without reducing the sauce completely. :smile:

H'mmm. I may have missed the reduction step, or perhaps it's because I finished it in the slow cooker because I wasn't going to be home. Thanks for that knowledge.

Regardless, it was good.


Don't ask. Eat it.

www.kayatthekeyboard.wordpress.com

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Regardless, it was good.

It looks super-savoury.

And Matthew Grant, your pork tenderloin looks impressive (the meat in particular, done just right, to my eyes). Is it a dish you've cooked before ? How do the garlic leaves, fennel and orange work with the meat ?


QUIET!  People are trying to pontificate.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Lots of good looking dinners in this thread! David, how was the chili-glazed salmon? Looks fantastic.

Tonight I made a tomato lentil stew, loaded with vegetables, served over couscous.

eg_lentilstew_032810.jpg


I'm gonna go bake something…

wanna come with?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest
This topic is now closed to further replies.
Sign in to follow this  

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...