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Dinner! 2010


Jmahl
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Pork chop with part fried, part roasted potatoes, tomato, carrot, onion and leek with a butter and wine pan juice sauce.

That does look delicious, and for me the plate has its nostalgia value. You mentioned before that you'd a new lens - how is that working out ?

QUIET!  People are trying to pontificate.

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Don't know why you're not happy with the photo – looks great!

cheers! I think it was more just down to the Pork looking overly dark in it... I didn't really check photo's when I took them as I was hungry and wanted to eat!

Pork chop with part fried, part roasted potatoes, tomato, carrot, onion and leek with a butter and wine pan juice sauce.
That does look delicious, and for me the plate has its nostalgia value. You mentioned before that you'd a new lens - how is that working out ?

The new lens is great. I've not got fully to grips with using it on manual at the moment. And have been using the basic close up auto setting on the camera but I'm loving the pictures i'm getting, lovely and clear close up shot's with great detail. I've got a few deserts up on the sweet's topic as well. I'd like to have caught the bubbling of the crumble just out of the oven better but that's something to work on. (have to make more crumble!)

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No pictures for tonight.

St Patrick's Day had to wait a day.

Corned beef, potatoes, carrots and cabbage all cooked in Guinness along with a fresh homemade loaf of Irish Soda Bread (James Beard recipe).

Edited by Porthos (log)

Porthos Potwatcher
The Once and Future Cook

;

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Gradually getting back to cooking, with assistance from daughter/apprentice for things I can't handle yet, like dicing onions or shallots.

Steak and onion sandwiches on French bread with melted Provolone:

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And another night, tortellini with pesto cream sauce, and reasonably decent out-of-season tomatos:

tortellini.jpg

Don't ask. Eat it.

www.kayatthekeyboard.wordpress.com

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Last night I did what I call my ‘west meets east’ chicken curry. Lots of cardamoms, cumin seeds, ginger, chilli flakes all laced with tinned tomatoes and yoghurt and finished with crème fraîche. Yum Yum :wub:

101_0110.JPG

Pam Brunning Editor Food & Wine, the Journal of the European & African Region of the International Wine & Food Society

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Greetings, all. This seems as good a place as any to make my first post, so here it is: Electrifying Kung Pao. I live in Concord, N.H. so, I'm a solid 50 minutes from remotely authentic Chinese food. Boston is only an hour away, but who wants that drive on a Thursday night. So, here's my Kung Pao chicken, loaded with dried peppers and Sichiuan peppercorns. I'm digging the spicy numb thing so much right now, I'm thinking I'll do Ma Po Dofu on Monday.

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Sort of an experiment tonight with a rack of lamb. The rack of lamb was o.k., but the beans were only so-so. I usually do a puree of cannelini beans with roasted garlic, lemon and rosemary. Today I added some whole garbanzo beans. I really didn't like the taste and texture of the two beans but it was at least something different. The sauce for the lamb was a simple reduction of the pan juices, beef stock and red wine.

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A hearty dinner soup, Piedmontese Bean Soup with Spareribs from Paula Wolfert's Mediterranean Claypot Cooking.

PiedmonteseSoup_1605.jpg

This soup is rich with pancetta, pork spareribs, beans, garlic, onions, parmesan cheese, and fresh herbs like sage, rosemary, and marjoram. Some dried red pepper and cinnamon give the soup a spicy kick, too. A pig's foot was supposed to go into the mix, but there was no time for extra shopping, so I omitted it. This soup tasted delicious without it. Served with plenty of crusty French bread, and for dessert, some sweet and refreshing Murcott tangerines.

ETA: The beans are a bicolor variety from Rancho Gordo called Yellow Eye.

Edited by djyee100 (log)
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Delicious looking pizzas, Robirdstx.

A Sunday dinner here of Pork Chops in the Style of Auvergne (Cotes de Porc a l'Auvergnate). This is a casserole of sauteed pork chops and braised cabbage in a sauce of sage, onion, white wine, and cream, topped with Gruyere cheese. A traditional dish from south-central France.

Just out of the oven.

PorkAuvergne_1615.jpg

Served with steamed potatoes.

PorkAuvergnePlate_1629.jpg

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Delicious looking pizzas, Robirdstx.

A Sunday dinner here of Pork Chops in the Style of Auvergne (Cotes de Porc a l'Auvergnate). This is a casserole of sauteed pork chops and braised cabbage in a sauce of sage, onion, white wine, and cream, topped with Gruyere cheese. A traditional dish from south-central France.

I'm generally not much for cooked cabbage but that looks beautiful. I'd give it a go.

Porthos Potwatcher
The Once and Future Cook

;

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Thanks, crowdingthepan.

For 2.5kg / 5.5 lbs of chicken legs, I salted with 1.5tsp (~7.5 grams) salt, added 8 minced chili peppers and left in the fridge for 2 days (normally 1; I was away over the weekend). I mixed in the juice of 2.5 lemons and left that to sit while I minced a whole head's worth of garlic cloves with a couple of inches of ginger, and mixed the last about 2tbsp of curry powder left over from a self-catering holiday, and 5 or 6 tbsp of paprika, into 250g / half a pound of yoghurt, with a little more salt and 4 or 5 tbsps of chopped spring mint from the pot on the balcony. I mixed all of that into the chicken and left again, overnight.

Other times, I'll substitute cumin & coriander & a little more chili for the curry powder, or use home-prepared garam masala, or home-prepared curry paste (paste of course staying vibrant where powder fades over time).

Edited by Blether (log)

QUIET!  People are trying to pontificate.

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I like the look of the pork chops and the chicken. I had a duck crown so decided to slow roast it for a change, I never seem to get the skin crisp enough for my liking when it is still pink. It crisped up beautifully and the celeriac, parsnips and sweet potato I roasted underneath it were good too. I served it with red wine sauce. :biggrin:101_0115.JPG

Pam Brunning Editor Food & Wine, the Journal of the European & African Region of the International Wine & Food Society

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Lasagna Verde Bolognese

Terrific........when I make lasagna, the different layers are not so clearly visible. Seeing your layers and fillings so prominent (delicious looking) like that, it looks to me like a 7 layer cake, savory Italian style. Would you mind sending a piece post haste please ? :rolleyes:

Edited by Aloha Steve (log)

edited for grammar & spelling. I do it 95% of my posts so I'll state it here. :)

"I have never developed indigestion from eating my words."-- Winston Churchill

Talk doesn't cook rice. ~ Chinese Proverb

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Delicious looking pizzas, Robirdstx.

A Sunday dinner here of Pork Chops in the Style of Auvergne (Cotes de Porc a l'Auvergnate). This is a casserole of sauteed pork chops and braised cabbage in a sauce of sage, onion, white wine, and cream, topped with Gruyere cheese. A traditional dish from south-central France.

Just out of the oven.

PorkAuvergne_1615.jpg

Served with steamed potatoes.

PorkAuvergnePlate_1629.jpg

djyee -- that casserole looks so good it nearly makes me want to cry! Can you share the recipe?

Em

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A Sunday dinner here of Pork Chops in the Style of Auvergne (Cotes de Porc a l'Auvergnate)...

djyee -- that casserole looks so good it nearly makes me want to cry! Can you share the recipe?

Em

Don't cry, Emily_R! I'm glad to share the recipe.

Porthos, the secret to this dish is to cook the cabbage in cream. If you cook cabbage in cream, that will mellow out the cabbage and not produce the boiled cabbage smell that bothers people. Milk also works for cooking cabbage, not just cream, but for a good sauce in this recipe, use cream.

I learned to make this dish from Josette King, the daughter of a French hotel chef who taught a French cooking class in the basement of the Boston YWCA in the mid 1970s. Yes, I've been cooking this dish that long.

Pork Chops in the Style of Auvergne

(Cotes de Porc a l'Auvergnate)

1 medium-size cabbage

1/2 cup heavy cream

salt & pepper

1 TB butter

4 large pork chops

1 cup chopped onion

1/2 tsp dried or 1 tsp freshly chopped sage

3/4 cup dry white wine

1/4 cup shredded Gruyere or Swiss cheese

Quarter and core the cabbage. Blanche well in a pot of boiling water until the cabbage is just tender. Drain well and let cool somewhat. Dice or chop coarsely.

Place the cabbage in a heavy saucepan, stir in the cream, add S & P, and bring to a simmer. Let simmer for 30 mins over low heat, stirring occasionally.

Meanwhile, heat the butter in a skillet and fry the pork chops until golden brown and fully cooked. Remove from skillet and keep warm.

Add the onion and sage to the skillet, and cook over moderate heat until the onion is golden and very tender. Raise the heat to high and add the wine, scraping any brown bits in the pan. Reduce the liquid to about one-half.

When the cabbage is done, pour the liquid in the skillet over the cabbage. Combine well. Taste and adjust for salt.

To assemble the casserole: Preheat oven to 325 degrees. Lightly butter a shallow baking dish. Spread half the cabbage in the dish, add the pork chops in a single layer, then cover with the remaining cabbage. Pour any liquid or juices over all. Sprinkle with cheese. Bake for about 20 mins, until the casserole is heated through and the cheese is melted. Serve immediately.

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yesterday after a few hours of field work and waiting for johnnybird to get home, tested a recipe for Cooks Illustrated.

pork roast that was marinated overnight in a mixture of beer, onions, dijon mustard and honey that was heated then pureed in a blender. reserved the marinade in a saucepan, patted the roast dry then seared in a dutch oven in olive oil. scattered fresh sauerkraut around it, pushed in a few juniper berries and add a dash of the reserved marinade. baked at 375 for 30 minutes, then add a bit more marinade, another 30 minutes and repeat one more time. pass the remaining marinade through a chinois and heat with a beurre marinee.

the Cook's Illustrated recipe was for carrots and shallots with thyme and lemon. dead simple and johnnybird really loved it. 1 lb of carrots cut in half then sliced lengthwise into even thickness. microwave on high for 3 minutes with 1 Tbsp water. mix with 1/2 lb shallots sliced in half vertically, 2 Tbsp butter that has been melted and cooled, some pepper and salt and 2 Tbsp fresh thyme leaves. roast in a 425 oven for 25 minutes, stirring after 15.

then some plain jacket potatoes to mix with the gravy

Nothing is better than frying in lard.

Nothing.  Do not quote me on this.

 

Linda Ellerbee

Take Big Bites

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