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Dinner! 2008


Shelby
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Chris the presentation looks fine to me. The potato shape reminds me of Mochi. I would have kept it the same except put the potatoes and lamb in the center of the plate and moved the gratin to another plate.

That egg foo young looks great!

The recipe of the sausage rice is simple.

Start with sofrito and olive oil. Add the sausages and cook for a bit. Add tomato sauce, and add rice, one tablepoon of salt per cup, a dash of veg oit and water to cook. The sofrito, tomato sauce and seasoning all depend on taste. I do one can of sausgages per cup of rice.

Yesterdays dinner. The last part of the duck.

This breast was pan seared and finished in the oven.

The sauce is a duck glace reduction with creme fraishe. I then added a little tonkatsu sauce to sweeten and give an extra edge. Came out awsome.

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The salad is a cuke/tomato salad on tozasu with shiracha.

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Chris the presentation looks fine to me.  The potato shape reminds me of Mochi.  I would have kept it the same except put the potatoes and lamb in the center of the plate and moved the gratin to another plate. 

That egg foo young looks great!

The recipe of the sausage rice is simple.

Start with sofrito and olive oil.  Add the sausages and cook for a bit.  Add tomato sauce, and add rice, one tablepoon of salt per cup, a dash of veg oit and water to cook.  The sofrito, tomato sauce and seasoning all depend on taste.  I do one can of sausgages per cup of rice.

Yesterdays dinner.  The last part of the duck. 

This breast was pan seared and finished in the oven.

The sauce is a duck glace reduction with creme fraishe.  I then added a little tonkatsu sauce to sweeten and give an extra edge.  Came out awsome.

gallery_56834_5307_347855.jpg

The salad is a cuke/tomato salad on tozasu with shiracha.

gallery_56834_5307_189718.jpg

Dr J-Your photos and plating are looking more delicious all the time. I especially like your idea of using tonkatsu sauce as a accent. I might have to try that. I've only thought of tonkatsu as a sauce for breaded cutlets but now I'm going to try your suggestion of using it as a sauce for other meats. Great idea.

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French Bistro dishes last night.

"Pissaladiere"-Caramalized Onion Tart with lots of caramalized onions, anchovy paste, anchovies, roasted red peppers and black olives. Served with arugula dressed with olive oil and lemon juice.

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Then Bacon-Wrapped Pork Tenderloin on Sauteed Mustard Cabbage.

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Last night I tried out my Christmas gift pressure cooker for the first time. I did BBQ chicken. I also served Molly Steven's "World's Best Braised Green Cabbage" and cornmeal pan rolls:

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Bruce - thank you so much for directing me to the cabbage recipe. As you know, I am not a cooked cabbage fan - I usually find it stinky, strong tasting and, worst of all squeeky :blink: ! This is not like that at all! It was mellow and tender and I really liked it. Mr. Kim, who likes cooked cabbage anyway absolutely loved it!

My inaugural pressure cooker meal was a mixed success. It tasted very good, but this is what the pan looked like after the chicken and sauce was removed:

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:angry: I don't know what I did wrong. The chicken was a little scorched in some places, but didn't taste burned and neither did the sauce. I have been doing some reading about pressure cookers and I know enough liquid is important and the recipe only called for 2 cups of bbq sauce, but no extra liquid. Anyone have any ideas? I followed the recipe to the letter.

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Here's a dinner from a couple of nights ago, Filet Mignon with Baked Potato (tope with sauteed bell peppers and onion).

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My little one wanted to make Filipino Empanadas. Since I had leftover meat filling from the empanadas I baked before, I thawed them out and made dough.

Here's Billy rolling out the dough.

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Spooning the filling on the dough.

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Crimping the edges with a fork to seal everything tight.

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Brushing the milk on for that nice glazed look.

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And lastly, poking holes into the pies to let the steam out when it bakes.

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Finally, I bake them in our tiny oven.

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And here's Billy with his Empanadas.

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Can you say proud mommy? :rolleyes:

Doddie aka Domestic Goddess

"Nobody loves pork more than a Filipino"

eGFoodblog: Adobo and Fried Chicken in Korea

The dark side... my own blog: A Box of Jalapenos

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Then Bacon-Wrapped Pork Tenderloin on Sauteed Mustard Cabbage. 

gallery_41580_4407_29222.jpg

That looks phenomenal. How did you cook the tenderloin, stovetop or oven?

Actually a combination of both.

I seasoned the tenderloin and then wrapped it with basic bacon, nothing fancy like prosciutto. Then I tied the little roast with string. I sauteed each side on the stove in a cast iron skillet over medium-high heat to start the bacon browning. I would say the total time in the skillet over the stove was about 10 minutes. Then it went into a 425 oven. I always turn the meat in the oven a couple of times to make sure it browns even. I think the total time roasting in the oven was about 15 minutes. So total cooking time was about 25 minutes. I know it doesn't sound like I cooked the pork long enough, lots of people still have that fear of getting sick if pork isn't cooked enough.

You'll see the pork is a bit pink in the middle, but today's pork is very lean and so you can cook it medium rare to keep it juicy without a fear of getting sick. The bacon adds moisture, crispy texture and a smoky flavor.

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Stuff I've been making recently:

Maple glazed pork loin stuffed with cranberry-buffalo-pork sausage stuffing, with a pomegranite balsamic and maple sauce. Sugar snap peas with lemon zest.

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Meatball sliders- I have leftover meatballs (from making wedding soup) and got fresh rolls and fresh buffalo mozzarella from the farm market.

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In preparation for St. Patrick's Day- Guinness and Chocolate Cheesecake (in the freezer now-hubby will take it into the office next week)

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Lemon sole is still the freshest fish available in the market at the moment. Gorgeous ruby red roe and pearly flesh is so appetising. Also it finally dawned on me how to take the whole fillet off each side, see you can teach an oldish dog new tricks! Breaded, fried with peas and boiled baby new potatoes, simple and tasty:

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It's been way too long since our old food processor died, so to celebrate our finally replacing it, I made a big platter of potato pancakes the other night.

Served a few fresh brats and some kraut alongside, but they were definitely singing backup to those heavenly latkes.

No picture, I'm afraid. The software that came with our new camera isn't playing nicely with my ISP. In any case, it's not the world's most photogenic dinner, especially compared to so many of those gorgeous ones I drool over here every day!

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Oooh, that looks so good LaCookrasha! Can you share the recipe? I've got 2 pounds of pork waiting in the fridge.

Hello doddie, THANKS! This is how I made it:

Ingredients

2lbs of pork

1/2c canola or vegetable oil

1tsp oregano

1/2 tsp thyme pwder

1/2 tsp cumin powder

1/2 tsp onion powder

1/4 tsp black pepper

1 tsp or a little more of sea salt or kosher

1-1/2 T of brown sugar

3 T soy sauce

1/2 c sour or seville orange juice(naranja agria)*

2-3 T sake

1 inch piece of ginger (minced)

4 garlic cloves (minced)

3-4 cinnamon sticks,(broken into shreds)

1/4 c water

* if you can't find sour oranges see if you can find it bottled, if no luck then mix:

Juice of 1 Orange

Juice of 1 Grapefruit

Juice of 1 Lemon

Juice of 1 Lime

take 1/2 c for the recipe and save the rest in fridge for a marinade for other meats, poultry etc...

In a bowl first pour the oil then the rest of ingredients except the cinnamon and pork. mix well oil and ingredients with a spoon. Then we take the pork cut it into pieces, we wash and put it into a pan, we pour the seasoned oil over pork, add the shredded cinnamon and 1/4c of water or a little bit more if you wish, combine everything well, COVER and cook on low heat 45 min to an hour. Then turn heat up, med-high and cook UNCOVERED for another hour turning once or twice during this last part. This goes well with white rice! :wink:

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