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Dinner! 2007


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Thanks Shaya. I do use potato. I think with the right kind of potato you can reduce the flour. One chef here has it down to about 85g per 500g of flour (standard of Batali et al has it at closer to 150g per 500g). I also bake the potatoes rather than boil. Puree, let cool. Add two egg yolks. blend lightly and roll into snakes and cut. Then either roll gently against a paddle or fork. (BTW, I tried doing this in America with Idahos and had the most perfect gnocchi dough - which dissolved to nothing when I put the bloody things in water!)

The endive foam was just as you say. I braised them first with wine and stock.

"Gimme a pig's foot, and a bottle of beer..." Bessie Smith

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"111,111,111 x 111,111,111 = 12,345,678,987,654,321" Bruce Frigard 'Winesonoma' - RIP

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Salad of Spring Greens with Bleu Cheese and Toasted/Caramelized Hazelnuts. (Although those of us who are natives to the Northwest still call them 'filberts.')

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Onion Rings

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Pommes de Terre Macaire (although that's what the French call it, out West I suppose one of our trendy places would call it "baked potato upside down cake.")

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Sorry, had to use the bleu cheese twice in the same menu, this time on top of a pan roasted filet.

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The best part of this dinner was the Tangerine Pudding Cake with Candied Tangerine and Tangerine Honey.

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Very nice David! Tell me more about the potato dish. Specifically, how to make it. :biggrin:

Marlene

cookskorner

Practice. Do it over. Get it right.

Mostly, I want people to be as happy eating my food as I am cooking it.

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Very nice David!  Tell me more about the potato dish.  Specifically, how to make it. :biggrin:

It is an easy potato dish but takes two days to get the potatoes right before sauteeing. On day one start with baking russet potatoes. I only use russets, probably my bias since I live in Washington near the Idaho border where russets rule. I bake them for 1 hour and 20 minutes in a hot 400 oven. Let them cool to room temperature, then put the whole potatoes in the fridge to cool overnight. This allows the sugars to cool inside the potato.

When you are ready for dinner, heat a non stick skillet over medium heat. I use clarified butter to give the potatoes the best golden color and crispy outside. You are basically cooking chunks of cold baked potato.

I use a melon baller to scoop out the potato flesh. Then place the chunks of potato in the skillet with the butter. I press down the potatoes with a spatula and let them cook about 15 minutes to get that nice brown crust. Then place a plate on top, invert it over and slip the undercooked side of the potato back in the skillet to brown. You are basically cooking both sides of a cake made of baked potato chunks. I garnished it with fresh thyme, sour cream and chives. It is delicious with any roasted meat.

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Thanks David! This just went on my list to make this week. I am always looking for different ways to make potatoes. :smile:

Marlene

cookskorner

Practice. Do it over. Get it right.

Mostly, I want people to be as happy eating my food as I am cooking it.

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What a run of beautiful dinners!

Tonight we enjoyed tinga Poblana from Rick Bayless’ Authentic Mexican. This was a smoky dry stew of pork, potatoes, and tomatoes with chorizo sausage, chipotles in adobo, onions, garlic, and oregano, topped with queso fresco and avocadoes. We will definitely make this again. Unpictured sides included eternal cucumbers, jasmine rice, and tossed salad with mustard and shallot vinaigrette.

Tinga Poblana

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That meal looks great, David. The potatoes, the filet, all of it!

Bruce, I would love to try that stew. It sounds really flavorful. Mexican is one cuisine I haven't explored at all.

So Rocky...it's the old BBQ sauce from a jar trick... no wonder I didn't know what it was. If you were around last summer you would know I am severely BBQ impaired, through no fault of my own of course; our neighbors have declared it strictly verboten...

Edited by Shaya (log)
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I am trying to find a new organic meat source locally. I bought some ground beef from a local purveyer at the farmer's market and decided the best way to judge the meat would be to make burgers. Of course this gave me an excuse to try my hand at making kaisers...

The verdict? Interestingly, they were like no burgers I had ever made before. They were extremely meaty and smooth, and had the texture of chopped up meat rather than ground. And no mystery bits that catch in your teeth. I know I am sold. :smile:

Organic Beef Burgers with Chipotle Sauce, Bacon, Chedder, Fresh Baked Kaisers and Homemade Pommes Frites

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And how did you make those onion rings, David?  I don't think I've ever seen homemade onion rings that look that good.  Onion rings are hard to find in Japan, so I'm always looking for a good recipe!

Thanks for the comments. I use large 'sweet' onions. In American markets the main varieties we see are Mayan, Vidalia from Georgia and Walla Walla Sweets. I live in Northeast Washington about two hours from Walla Walla where the Sweets are grown. They are sweet, yet still have that spicy onion flavor. Deep-frying the onions seems to bring out their sweet flavor.

I use a mandoline to slice the onion into thin rings. You can use any type of slicer with a very sharp blade that has a thin setting. I try to avoid using a knife because I'm not good at getting a consistent, thin onion ring when I use a knife.

I cut the rings at about 1/8"-1/4" thickness. That's pretty thin, but this is what seems to make them crispy and light when frying.

I then soak them in milk in a bowl placed in the fridge. I let them soak about one hour. This helps to take away some of the raw flavor, but also helps the coating stick to the onions.

I use a seasoned flour mix that I buy right out of the market. I use a brand called "Pride of the West." You can probably use any seasoned fry mix or just use regular flour. The mix I buy is actually better than if I make my own mix. I dredge the onion rings in the flour and then deep-fry them. I don't season the flour or the onion rings before frying because I think the seasoning tends to burn in the oil.

I use canola oil heated to about 365 degrees. Any hotter and I find the coating burns.

You only need to dee-fry the onion rings for about two minutes. They are golden, crispy and light. I season them immediately after they come out of the oil using sea salt, black pepper and paprika. The paprika is mainly for color, but also adds some sweetness. I also sometimes used smoked paprika-it has a wonderful sweet-smoky flavor and smoky aroma.

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Left work half an hour earlier today and found time to cook Peppered Rack of Lamb, Herb Crusted Sweetbreads, Asparagus, Crushed Jersey Mids & Red Wine Reduction. My wife was very pleased when she came home... :biggrin:

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Not my usual mid-week fare, honest!!

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I use a melon baller to scoop out the potato flesh.  Then place the chunks of potato in the skillet with the butter.  I press down the potatoes with a spatula and let them cook about 15 minutes to get that nice brown crust.  Then place a plate on top, invert it over and slip the undercooked side of the potato back in the skillet to brown. 

That sounds (and looks) delicious. But what do you do with the potato skins?
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I use a melon baller to scoop out the potato flesh.  Then place the chunks of potato in the skillet with the butter.  I press down the potatoes with a spatula and let them cook about 15 minutes to get that nice brown crust.  Then place a plate on top, invert it over and slip the undercooked side of the potato back in the skillet to brown. 

That sounds (and looks) delicious. But what do you do with the potato skins?

Great question, I'll admit though that I put the skins in the garden compost heap. Since you are using the potato meat-you won't have any potato meat left to say stuff back in the skins. The potato skins aren't used in the finished dish.

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So Rocky...it's the old BBQ sauce from a jar trick... no wonder I didn't know what it was.  If you were around last summer you would know I am severely BBQ impaired, through no fault of my own of course; our neighbors have declared it strictly verboten...

You want I should come over and smoke out yer neighbours boss?

Rocky

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Ran into some (free) beautiful haricot verts tonight ( a freind's sister works for a veggie wholesaler, and if he doesn't like the look of a case of veggies, out it goes, and we benefit!) sauteed a chopped onion, a ham patty, chopped fine and the blanched beans. Good stuff! :biggrin:

"Commit random acts of senseless kindness"

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Prawncrackers: I love the crust on your lamb.

I made guppymo's beef soup tonight, substituting tomato paste for tomatoes and using angel hair pasta for noodles. This was good and quick as advertised – I look forward to trying it during tomato season.

Sides included stir-fried potato slivers with chiles and Sichuan peppercorns (basically, Sichuan hash browns), cukes, and tossed salad with ginger-mustard vinaigrette.

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Prawncrackers: I love the crust on your lamb.

I made guppymo's beef soup tonight, substituting tomato paste for tomatoes and using angel hair pasta for noodles. This was good and quick as advertised – I look forward to trying it during tomato season.

Sides included stir-fried potato slivers with chiles and Sichuan peppercorns (basically, Sichuan hash browns), cukes, and tossed salad with ginger-mustard vinaigrette.

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Bruce~

how funny. I made this 2 nights ago, threw in a good tomato and it was perfect ! Hit the spot :smile:

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Line Caught, self-canned Pacific Albacore w/white beans

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Horseradish Crusted Pacific Salmon w/Dijon Vinaigrette Leeks

*leek Vinaigrette from yesterdays NY Times Food section

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Prawncrackers, that's some awesome looking lamb and the sweetbreads look great!

Bacon, egg, lettuce, tomato, and cheese sandwich the other night, using pork jowl bacon, man I love the stuff.

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Last night was a mango avocado salad with lime cilantro chicken.

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Rocky

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Rocky if we squished your last 2 dinners into a roll....you would get

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a Chicken, Avocado BLT

tracey

actually I never did put the lettuce on :rolleyes:

Edited by rooftop1000 (log)

The great thing about barbeque is that when you get hungry 3 hours later....you can lick your fingers

Maxine

Avoid cutting yourself while slicing vegetables by getting someone else to hold them while you chop away.

"It is the government's fault, they've eaten everything."

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Prawncrackers, that's some awesome looking lamb and the sweetbreads look great!

Bacon, egg, lettuce, tomato, and cheese sandwich the other night, using pork jowl bacon, man I love the stuff.

beltob3.jpg

Last night was a mango avocado salad with lime cilantro chicken.

mangoavocadosaladwithchry3.jpg

Rocky

Small world, Rockdoggy, that's exactly what I plan on eating tomorrow, blt with egg and cheese on a good kaiser roll.. not sure I'll last til dinner time, your picture has me drooling already! :wub:

---------------------------------------

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Dockhl: Great minds, eh?

Tracey: Too funny!

We grilled five-spice chicken wings (again), stir-fried long beans with black beans and garlic, and served cukes, jasmine rice, and tossed salad with vinaigrette. This should be the last batch of wings for a while – we finally used up a 10-pound bag.

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