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Dinner! 2007


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A few days ago, I wanted to sous vide a ribeye and then grill it on a Japanese Grill (Krono) with Binchotan charcoal for extra flavor. Unfortunately, the weather dd not co-orperate, so I had to sear it on the stove.

Prime, Dry-Aged Ribeye

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Packaged for Sous Vide with Thyme and Rosemary

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Made some Garlic & Herb oven roasted potatoes

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Plated along with Portobello Mushrooms, Leeks, Shallots and Red Wine Demi glace.

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A few days later, made a

Turkey Osso Bucco with Mashed Potatoes

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For my wife and i today i cooked Razor clams in Black Bean sauce, Squid and Gai Lan in Oyster sauce, Pork Spring Rolls with dip. Very Cantonese, very full - i need to lie down....

..

Sorry about the blurry-ass pic, was in a hurry. It's that Chinese thing - have to eat it while it's hot!!  :biggrin:

That looks delicious Prawncracker.

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Berkshire roast pork with mashed and green beans in mustard butter. And just for Bruce, I put my veggies on my plate. :biggrin:

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Dessert was either a cinnamon bun or chocolate pudding

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This time I tried the cinnamon bun recipe from King Arthur's Bakers Companion which we all really liked. The pudding recipe comes from Nick Malgieri's Perfect Light Desserts.

Marlene

cookskorner

Practice. Do it over. Get it right.

Mostly, I want people to be as happy eating my food as I am cooking it.

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we started with Jasmine's tonight with Aperol instead of Campari which I brought back on my last CA trip (can't find it in WA). served with pan fried checi with garlic and herbs de provence. 2nd cocktail was the same but made with tequilla- both very yummy and very easy to drink!

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then spaghetti with HUGE meatballs, mozzerella and roasted garlic toasts. served with a 98 beringer reserve cab franc

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Sunday Dinner was hubby's forte: Pork barbeque slabs & ribs + homemade Kentucky Fried Chicken (Hubby's a Ky Wildcat!).

Fall off the bones Kentucky Pork Barbeque

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Fingerlickin's Fried Chicken...

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Sides.... Tater salad

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Braised Sprouts with Bacon in Red Wine Vinegar sauce

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Buttered corn and carrots...

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Foot-long sausages for the kiddies...

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Also included were tossed salad, garlic fried rice, assorted cookies and dessert was fruit berry cobbler (not pictured but was oh-so-good!)...

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Doddie aka Domestic Goddess

"Nobody loves pork more than a Filipino"

eGFoodblog: Adobo and Fried Chicken in Korea

The dark side... my own blog: A Box of Jalapenos

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And just for Bruce, I put my veggies on my plate. :biggrin:
Thanks, Marlene - I feel much better now. :laugh:

Oh good, I'm glad. :biggrin: Veggies in a separate bowl was something my father insisted on, usually when the veg was accompanied by a sauce or lots of butter. His rationale was that if the veg and sauce were in a separate bowl, it made it easier to sop up the sauce or butter with the veg. :cool:

Marlene

cookskorner

Practice. Do it over. Get it right.

Mostly, I want people to be as happy eating my food as I am cooking it.

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Today, i did slow roasted rolled belly of pork. It was like a porchetta - stuffed with anchovy, lemon, rosemary and garlic. But unlike porchetta, i leave the skin on for some crispy crackling. I love the weekend! :biggrin:

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Domestic Goddess, how do you have the time to take individual photos of that lovely spread? I bet your family didn't thank you for making them wait .... :laugh:

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Today, i did slow roasted rolled belly of pork.  It was like a porchetta - stuffed with anchovy, lemon, rosemary and garlic.  But unlike porchetta, i leave the skin on for some crispy crackling.  I love the weekend!   :biggrin:

Domestic Goddess, how do you have the time to take individual photos of that lovely spread? I bet your family didn't thank you for making them wait ....  :laugh:

Sounds in the background, while I hunker down to shoot the pics...

"Are you done yet?

"Can we eat now?"

"Mom, it's gonna get cold!" :biggrin:

That pork belly is making me drool now.... (wipes chin)

Edited by Domestic Goddess (log)

Doddie aka Domestic Goddess

"Nobody loves pork more than a Filipino"

eGFoodblog: Adobo and Fried Chicken in Korea

The dark side... my own blog: A Box of Jalapenos

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Nice to see photos from others who are cooking one of the best parts of the pig-the belly. I buy mine at a local Asian grocery store. It's always available fresh.

I've been working on testing a lot of different techniques to get the skin crispy but keep the meat moist. Gone through one suckling pig and literally the bellies of two hogs in the past three weeks. I think I've finally gotten the recipe where I want it.

I don't particularly like keeping the rind (er-skin) on the pork belly. I found that the rind got really tough, crisp and hard, hard as leather. I joked it was like peanut brittle, only harder, without the peanuts and I called it 'pig brittle.' So I cut the rind off, running the knife just under the rind like you would if you were cutting the skin off a side of salmon. I left all the fat layer between the rind and layer of meat. I scored the fat in a criss cross pattern. It was about a 3lb. piece of pork belly. I put it in a large roasting pan, skin side up. Roasted it at 475 for about 30 minutes to get it going, then reduced the heat to 300 and slow roasted it for 4 hours. I put water in the roasting pan up to the 'fat line' so the meat would braise while the fat layer was exposed to the dry heat. I turned on the broiler the last 10 minutes of cooking to crisp the skin. The skin gets crispy but stays soft when you bite into it. You feel guilty because you are basically eating pure pork fat but it is sooo good. It reminded me of the flavor of pork roasts from 30 years ago, very tasty-and fatty.

Here's a photo of the pork belly just out of the oven resting before carving.

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Here's the pork belly ready to serve-a nice chunk sitting on top of mashed potatoes. You can only see a hint of the sauce in the photo. The sauce was made of reduced beef stock with some veal demi-glace added, along with some sage out of my garden and some green peppercorns.

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The side dish was baby green beans. I saute them with oil and butter, then put in some chopped garlic and a few spoons of chickent stock-a recipe from Bouchon. Then I sprinkled the beans with sea salt and lemon zest before serving.

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David, everything looks great, but now I have to get out Bouchon and try the green bean recipe. They look fabulous.

Marlene

cookskorner

Practice. Do it over. Get it right.

Mostly, I want people to be as happy eating my food as I am cooking it.

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We only had dinner for 3, but here are some pics from last Saturday evening:

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Courgette & Goat Cheese Soup

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Wagyu Tri-Tip, Chive Butter, Butter-Crushed Potatoes, Bacon-Roasted Carrot, Pinot Noir Reduction

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Wines Paired to the Steak

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1975 Francis Darroze Armagnac (aged 24 years in oak)

Edited by SiseFromm (log)

R. Jason Coulston

jason@popcling.com

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Wow, kudos for the beautiful meals upthread.

Both boys had sports tonight, so Mrs. C whipped up dinner. She marinated and broiled ribeye steaks, and heated up leftover pasta with bacon and microwave mashed potatoes. Cucumbers and green salad on the side (and, following Marlene’s example, out of the picture). :biggrin:

Elder son insisted that I take a picture of his plate (I would explode if I ate that much).

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The meals and the photos just keep getting better and better.

Marlene You are the master of pork roasts as well as Prime Ribs.

And those two pork belly photos Wow!. Is there anything better than pork cracklins? I'm definitely adding pork belly to my "have to cook soon list".

SiseFromm Wonderful dinner.

Bruce Your son certainly is eating well.

Saturday night we had pizza. Used some sourdough for the crust. Topped with Italian sausage, mushrooms and black olives.

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Sunday's dinner was beef tenderloin with Parisienne Potatoes, and steamed broccoli.

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Baked Sourdough Bagels this morning. Late lunch so dinner ended up being some of the leftover cream of asparagus soup I made yesterday along with a bagel.

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Ann

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Everything is so beautiful! I would love to cook the way you all do, but I just can't afford it. We do the best we can with what we have though! My husband decided to get creative and do a big stir-fry. He did the veggies (carrots, celery, cabbage, onions, green peppers, and ginger) seasoned the way you would expect stir fry to be seasoned, but he cooked the chicken in a lemon and ginger sauce. It was AMAZING!

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Found fresh clams in the weekly street market in my town today. I decided to fix half of it as a soup (with ginger, onions and leeks) and the other half as a banchan (korean side dish) that I saw in a local restaurant. The clams are simmered in spicy sauce with chopped onions, carrots, zucchini and potatoes.

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I served it with rice, crispy fried pork belly and steamed rice...

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Doddie aka Domestic Goddess

"Nobody loves pork more than a Filipino"

eGFoodblog: Adobo and Fried Chicken in Korea

The dark side... my own blog: A Box of Jalapenos

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I guess I jumped around the globe for this dish-but even with so many different ingredients-the flavors all came together really well.

I prefer buying fresh Alaskan Halibut from my local fish store rather than what I find in the supermarket. I buy a large filet and then cut it into serving portions myself. I like to cut it at home so I can control the thickness of the filet-and I like them thick. I wrapped the halibut in prosciutto then seared it in olive oil to crisp the prosciutto. I sear it about 3 minutes on each side, then pop it into a 400 oven for 9 minutes.

The side dish is tabouleh salad-with lots of additions. I used whole wheat bulgur and then made it into a sort of tabouleh/Greek salad. I added parsley, mint and cilantro as the herbs, tomatoes, cucumber and green onion as the vegetables, and then feta cheese. I wish I hadn't forgotten to add some kalamata olives-would have been another good element. I tossed it with lots of Greek olive oil and lemon juice. Very tasty and fresh.

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Great run of meals & pix.

Last evening, asparagus soup finished with cream and a garni of the tender tips blanched, panko'd, fried, floated atop. With the Bulgarian bread tutmanik, which has layers of butter and filling of eggs and feta, in this case actual Bulgarian feta. A meal designed for catching up on Tivo'd Bad Luck Bride, the current Japanese Sunday drama.

Priscilla

Writer, cook, & c. ● #TacoFriday observant ●  Twitter    Instagram

 

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