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First meal from the new Weber bullet: baby back ribs rubbed with soy sauce, brown sugar, and five-spice powder. We also made stir-fried green beans with black beans and garlic, garlic English muffins, and a barbecue sauce made from hoisin sauce, rice vinegar, soy sauce, Dijon mustard, ground anise seed, and minced ginger and garlic. No one ate much barbecue sauce - apparently we are a family of dry-rib eaters.

More on Ribs – Baby Back and Spare

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Gorgeous, Ce'nedra! I love how the duck is looking up at us with accusing eyes from the pot. It seems like he's saying "Don't look at me like this! No!" I see jujubes and chestnuts in your stuffing, but what else went in? This dish reminds me a lot of one I had in Korea on several occasions, but the duck was baked in a clay pot, and served with a mustard-style dipping sauce.

I love Cambodian cuisine, and it's not really something that's easy pretty much anywhere I've ever lived. I learned to make amok at a cooking class in Phnom Penh (one I highly recommend, if you're in the neighbourhood!). It's similar to a Thai curry in the use of curry pastes and coconut milk, but the chilis used in the paste are dried. I have the photos from the original course that I could post in another thread, if anyone's interested. They look much better.

Ahahha those duck eyes gave me the shivers...as for what we used for the stuffing, I don't know the English (or Chinese for that matter) names for some of them, but I do recall there being ginkgo nuts (mainly because I had to suffer the removal of the shells), carrots, ginger, dried mushrooms, onion and barley.

I think there was more but my memory isn't the best :(

And why I would love to see a posting on Cambodian cuisine thank you very much :biggrin:

I know nothing of it and would like to learn more. Also, despite there being quite a large-ish number of Cambodian migrants over here, I've only come across one Cambodian (and it was Thai-Chinese-Cambodian) restaurant! I wonder why...it might be even more rare than finding Filipino restaurants!

C. sapidus: Your mole looks amazing! Did you use cocoa powder or actual Mexican chocolate? I've always pondered on making this but seeing as we don't have many Mexican products here, I never got around to it...

Beautiful duck, Ce’nedra, and I appreciate the blow-by-blow description of its preparation. Thanks also for the kind words about the mole. We did use Ibarra Mexican chocolate, about a disk and a half. We are fortunate to have three Latino markets nearby. Clearly, Australia needs to do a better job of encouraging Mexican immigration. :wink:

By the way, if you are still looking for cookbooks Hot, Sour, Salty, Sweet is a wonderful one with recipes from all countries that border the Mekong river, including Cambodia and the Yunnan region of China.

Thanks but I will have to give some of the credit to my mum who did most of the 'dirty' work with the duck hhahaha.

I have seen (on tv) those Mexican chocolate disks before, and I'm sure they have them here in Sydney, but it's surely rare and I've no idea where exactly.

AND I really HATE ordering things online so I'm hoping I don't need to resort to that. And you're right, Oz really should start encouraging a Mexican wave to our country SOOOON! Mexican food is really big here atm, mainly because we lack any good ones arghh!

Hot, Sour, Salty, Sweet sounds good! Could I have the author's name please? Thanks! Yunnan...that's defiantely a region I have particular interest in.

Musings and Morsels - a film and food blog

http://musingsandmorsels.weebly.com/

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I made Molly Stevens "Braised Savoy Cabbage with Saint-Marcellin" which was incredible. Her recipes continue to amaze me with their utter simplicity and deep flavors. Also had marinated pan seared pork chops and potato pancakes.

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Edited by monavano (log)
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Ok, the duck made me laugh out loud because it reminded me of A Christmas Story at the end...

Those little flat pretzel things, I can find in my local grocery stores (Weis, Bloom & Giant), but not in cheddar horseradish flavor...I bet those tasted good !

Today is going to be one of those days.....

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Ok, the duck made me laugh out loud because it reminded me of A Christmas Story at the end...

Those little flat pretzel things, I can find in my local grocery stores (Weis, Bloom & Giant), but not in cheddar horseradish flavor...I bet those tasted good !

They are addictive. In fact, my bag of them suspiciously disappeared that day :hmmm:

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My NYE Dinner:

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Roast beef turned around cream cheees/chives/horseradish, italian salame, pepperoncini, olives, herbed boccocini, NY State sharp cheddar. No cooking, but all taste!

Jamie Lee

Beauty fades, Dumb lasts forever. - Judge Judy

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