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Dinner! 2007


rarerollingobject
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Christmas Dinner, yum !

Prime rib (slow roasted)

Bobby Flay's baked and then mashed potatoes

Baked sweet potatoes w/ lime, maple syrup and seasoned salt

Brussel sprouts with cream and parmesan

Green beans with almonds

Frozen tangerine souffle for dessert

In the glass:

Chateau St Jean 2006 Chardonnay

Lone Madrone 2004 Barbera

The table:

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Out of the oven:

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Sliced:

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Dessert:

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This was SO good !

That looks wonderful!

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I got bored tonight and spent most of the evening in the kitchen cleaning out the fridge...

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"Steak au Poivre" (ack, the evil quoted dish!) -- Beef tenderloin pounded flat, peppered and briefly seared, sliced up and then rolled up inside prosciutto with a bit of creme fraiche and chives. Bourbon reduction sauce.

My 'sushi rolling' technique needs much work, unfortunately.

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Then my wife wanted me to cook the cauliflower. I sliced it paper thin and set it to roast for around 2 1/2 hours at somewhere under 200 degrees. Finished it with some cream, Parmesan and chive.

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Vegetable stew. Basically, it's all the elements of a thrown-together burgundy beef without the beef.

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Hi gang!  These aren't real exciting, but I'm posting them anyway  :raz:

Pickle roll-ups

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Dried beef cheese ball

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Mozzarella

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Veggie dip

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Roast chicken

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You must be joking. Honey that is some hardcore food porn, and I love the stuff on the toothpicks.

---------------------------------------

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Yum, lots of holiday food! Boiled ham, roast beef, steak au poivre - every time I look at this thread, I get new ideas.

It was a snowy day in Nova Scotia, and I was longing to be back in Southeast Asia. I put together a few dishes from my travels - not a true balanced dinner, but enough to give everyone a taste of what I'm missing.

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Chili lime salt - a classic Vietnamese table dip. Just the smell brings me back to Hanoi, even though the limes are different here.

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Kroeung- Cambodian curry paste, for -

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Amok - a steamed fish curry, meant to be steamed in banana leaves. Try to find those in Halifax in winter. I used parchment paper instead.

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Finished! Can you see my pen marks on the paper?

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Caramel pork, my favourite.

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Mango salad, to my Mum's recipe. Very light, without any oil.

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Chicken satays.

All with a nice German Gewurtztraminer, which went well with the spice, I thought. No Tiger beer to be had.

It's no substitute for the beach, though. *sigh

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I don't have a real recipe - I just watched a Vietnamese friend make it a couple of times. Take some fatty pork, like pork shoulder, and cube. Maybe 200g or so? Enough for two people, anyway. Marinate in a splash of fish sauce and chopped shallots for 30 min or so, with some ground fresh pepper. If you don't like fish sauce, you can use Knorr chicken powder. Take a hot pan and melt two tablespoons of sugar until it turns brown, and begins to bubble. Add a rice bowl of water (carefully). Add the pork, stir, cover, and cook until it reduces, maybe 30 minutes. That's not a great recipe, I'm sorry, but as long as you don't let the sugar burn, and you use a good fatty piece of pork, it turns out.

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What a coincidence. I was just watching Jamie Oliver's new show yesterday and he mentioned preparing rocket. I thought for sure I'd misheard him until I saw this thread. What the heck is rocket???

I think that rocket is another term for arugula, if I am not mistaken.

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Dried beef cheese ball

gallery_54689_4781_325898.jpg

OK. No one will be hurt if you divulge how you made this.

If you don't....well, no guarantees.

:wink:

And, *WHAT* are those marvelous-looking cracker-thingies that look like flat pretzels and where can I get them?

--Roberta--

"Let's slip out of these wet clothes, and into a dry Martini" - Robert Benchley

Pierogi's eG Foodblog

My *outside* blog, "A Pound Of Yeast"

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C. sapidus: Your mole looks amazing! Did you use cocoa powder or actual Mexican chocolate? I've always pondered on making this but seeing as we don't have many Mexican products here, I never got around to it...

dockhl: Your souffle looks soooooo gooooddd!!! Labour intensive? I suppose that's okay considering it was for Christmas dinner :raz:

Unlike me, I still resorted to the easy way out (super simple dessert) lol.

Was your souffle creamy? It looks creamy. Mmm...

Misplaced_Texan: Your anchovy salad looks delicious! And trust me, I don't normally say that about salads hahhaha.

Shelby: How did you make that beef cheese ball?!

nakji: Ooo Cambodian cuisine! I've never really seen much of Cambodian food so thanks for a peek of it :) Looks really fresh and tropical-like -yum!

How was it? Was it hard to make?

This is our Christmas dinner -it was just me and my parents -a very small dinner this year. Things were kept simple/to a minimum but it was delicious nevertheless :)

Lobster salad for lunch

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And inspired by junehl's Guo Ji Aap (fruit and seed duck), mum and I made a similar style duck but we baked our duck for that delicious flavour and also to release some fats, then we simmered it in a pot and sort of made a stew out of it, with its left-over stuffings.

Rubbed with soy sauce (not so nice to look at...)

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Prepared stuffing for duck

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We stir-fried and flavoured the stuffing then stuffed it into the duck

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Mum sewed the duck (not a very appetizing photo actually)

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Roasted duckie

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Preparing my simple dessert to go into the oven

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Roasted duck into the pot

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Our stuffed roasted duck stew-Chinese style

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Baked brown sugar custards for dessert (I wanted to make soft-centred choc pots but parents aren't that thrilled with chocolate, unlike me)

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Edited by Ce'nedra (log)

Musings and Morsels - a film and food blog

http://musingsandmorsels.weebly.com/

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Gorgeous, Ce'nedra! I love how the duck is looking up at us with accusing eyes from the pot. It seems like he's saying "Don't look at me like this! No!" I see jujubes and chestnuts in your stuffing, but what else went in? This dish reminds me a lot of one I had in Korea on several occasions, but the duck was baked in a clay pot, and served with a mustard-style dipping sauce.

I love Cambodian cuisine, and it's not really something that's easy pretty much anywhere I've ever lived. I learned to make amok at a cooking class in Phnom Penh (one I highly recommend, if you're in the neighbourhood!). It's similar to a Thai curry in the use of curry pastes and coconut milk, but the chilis used in the paste are dried. I have the photos from the original course that I could post in another thread, if anyone's interested. They look much better.

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Dried beef cheese ball

gallery_54689_4781_325898.jpg

OK. No one will be hurt if you divulge how you made this.

If you don't....well, no guarantees.

:wink:

And, *WHAT* are those marvelous-looking cracker-thingies that look like flat pretzels and where can I get them?

:biggrin::biggrin::biggrin:

The cheese ball is EASY.

2 dried beef packets (5 oz total)

1 softened cream cheese

2 chopped green onions

Dash of worcestershire sauce

Dash of onion juice

Dice the dried beef. Mix in all other ingredients and form into a ball. You can roll it in chopped parsley if you wish.

The pretzels are one of the best things I've tasted lately! I got them at a specialty kitchen store. They are horseradish and cheese flavored. They go great with the cheese ball!

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C. sapidus: Your mole looks amazing! Did you use cocoa powder or actual Mexican chocolate? I've always pondered on making this but seeing as we don't have many Mexican products here, I never got around to it...

Beautiful duck, Ce’nedra, and I appreciate the blow-by-blow description of its preparation. Thanks also for the kind words about the mole. We did use Ibarra Mexican chocolate, about a disk and a half. We are fortunate to have three Latino markets nearby. Clearly, Australia needs to do a better job of encouraging Mexican immigration. :wink:

By the way, if you are still looking for cookbooks Hot, Sour, Salty, Sweet is a wonderful one with recipes from all countries that border the Mekong river, including Cambodia and the Yunnan region of China.

Nakji, wow, great spread! I would chow down on that meal in a heartbeat.

Shelby, all of your meal looks good to me. Toothpicks, sate, it’s all food on a stick, and justly popular around the globe. :smile:

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Shelby, where did you get your dried beef? I've only ever seen chipped beef in packets, it's very lean, thinly sliced and extremely salty. That which you have appears to be a thicker slice, with a lovely marble. Fess up, please!

"Commit random acts of senseless kindness"

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Shelby, where did you get your dried beef? I've only ever seen chipped beef in packets, it's very lean, thinly sliced and extremely salty. That which you have appears to be a thicker slice, with a lovely marble. Fess up, please!

I swear, I swear! it's the same stuff you are talking about :smile::smile::smile:

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