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Dinner! 2007


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Bruce - I'd love the recipe for the Lime-Cilantro dressing - it sounds perfect for jicima!

Kim Shook: Here you go - jicama salad for lime-cilantro dressing (click).

Mexican Everyday tonight: grilled flank steak with garlicky ancho chile rub, served with grilled plantains, red onions, roasted tomatillo-chipotle salsa, and Mexican red rice. Next time I will chop and saute the red onions – grilling them is a pain.

Elder son ate a ton of steak and regretted it during basketball practice.

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Tracy! That is some beautiful stove! :wub: What make is it? I need to go buy me some lottery tickets. :wink:

[Mexican Everyday tonight: grilled flank steak with garlicky ancho chile rub, served with grilled plantains, red onions, roasted tomatillo-chipotle salsa, and Mexican red rice. Next time I will chop and saute the red onions – grilling them is a pain.

Bruce: Mexican Everyday by___________?

You cook alot from that book, so now I must have it. I want to add it to my Xmas wish-list - along with Tracy's stove! :laugh:

Dejah

www.hillmanweb.com

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Doodad the dipping sauce in the pic was just a couple of Thai chillies in some Kikkoman.  Sometimes with fried dumplings I like the Worcestershire/Soy dipping sauce but mostly I like a little heat (ok a lot) with my dumplings.  What kind of dipping sauce are you having trouble with?

For our dumplings, and seems to be the general case here in the States, there is a vinegar and soy ratio that I can't seem to master. The other additions are generally sesame oil and green onions. It is the right amount of tang to soy savory I can't do right.

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Bruce: Mexican Everyday by___________?

You cook alot from that book, so now I must have it. I want to add it to my Xmas wish-list - along with Tracy's stove!  :laugh:

Mexican Everyday, by Rick Bayless (eGullet-friendly Amazon link). Mr. Bayless does an excellent job of using shortcuts without compromising taste. This makes a lot more Mexican food (one of my first loves) possible on weeknights.

Probably cheaper than Tracey's stove, too. :wink:

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Bruce: Mexican Everyday by___________?

You cook alot from that book, so now I must have it. I want to add it to my Xmas wish-list - along with Tracy's stove!  :laugh:

by Rick Bayless (eGullet-friendly Amazon link). Mr. Bayless does an excellent job of using shortcuts without compromising taste. This makes a lot more Mexican food (one of my first loves) possible on weeknights.

Probably cheaper than Tracey's stove, too. :wink:

Thanks, Bruce! :biggrin:

Dejah

www.hillmanweb.com

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Dr. J: nice ribs, very post modern!

kellytree and proud daughter: fantastic!

Ted Fairhead: a handsome and pubworthy meat pie.

rooftop Tracey: I have oven envy.

C. sapidus: buena comida.

nakji: I just learned what nakji is!

A chunk of Atlantic salmon (1912g @ $11/kg) became 12 boneless steaks and 2 tail fillets. We pan fried the tail pieces last night in terriyaki with ramen noodles, tomato and corn. The remaining cuts got cryovac-ed and round 10% of the fish (trimmings) went into the stock pot for later:

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Peter Gamble aka "Peter the eater"

I just made a cornish game hen with chestnut stuffing. . .

Would you believe a pigeon stuffed with spam? . . .

Would you believe a rat filled with cough drops?

Moe Sizlack

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Ooooooh - I understand now. What's tempura sauce like? I've never seen it.

You've probably seen it. In Canada the most common brand is Kikkoman. It looks like this, and can be found in most Japanese or Chinese grocery stores. At least in Winnipeg, it can.

I don't know if they sell the same product in Japan, though. It's basically just another dashi/mirin/soy sauce combo, maybe with some sugar, too.

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Here is Wednesday's dinner:

seared goat rib chop on curry couscous, microplaned dried papaya and homemade bacon bits on top (homemade as in I raised the pig)

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The goat was in my freezer for a few months but it was still sweet and moist, a lot like lamb in texture and appearance - without the lamb flavour. A few chunks of the thick cut bacon was the base of the curry (onion, turmeric, garlic, fenugreek, scotch bonnet hot pepper).

Peter Gamble aka "Peter the eater"

I just made a cornish game hen with chestnut stuffing. . .

Would you believe a pigeon stuffed with spam? . . .

Would you believe a rat filled with cough drops?

Moe Sizlack

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peter the salmon and the goat are awsome. That is the kind of stuff I love to eat. Keep posting. mmmmmm homemade bacon bits.

Nakji - Prasantrin is correct, that tempura sauce she links works well and I have used it in the past. However I currently use tempura sauce from a restaurant whos owner I know, and there are different variations on making the sauce. One of which involves adding sake.

Since I mostly cook for myself I try to stay away from making those sauces myself. (Tempura, Eel, Tozasu, etc.). I just get them from the local restaurant and focus on new stuff.

Very nice stove rooftop, i think everybody here is very envious.

Kelly you should be proud of your daughter. I also have the same problem she does, i get involved in cooking and end up eating super late.

That jicama lime dressing sounds like it would be a great way to put a twist in ceviche. Going to try that next time i get some decent white fish.

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That jicama lime dressing sounds like it would be a great way to put a twist in ceviche.

Dr. J: Ceviche with jicama does sound like a nice twist.

Peter the eater: Muchas gracias, and lovely goat.

Shrimp stir-fried with garlic-cilantro-white pepper paste and briefly simmered with fish sauce, sugar, and water. Bacon-fried rice with lime and fried shallots.

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My 10 year old made dinner the other night. ... she did a great job but I am hiding all the cookbooks from now on so she will stick to things that are a little easier (and allow us to eat before 10pm!!) - a few of the ingredients we didn't have so she made some modifications.

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This is my favorite photo of the year on eGullet. A child, a smile and the joy of cooking. How wonderful. I am sure you are a very proud parent. Thanks for posting.

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Roast chicken, ala Bouchon

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With mashed, and green beans, steamed then tossed in butter, lemon and garlic.

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And gravy of course

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Dessert was my four layer devils food cake

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Marlene

cookskorner

Practice. Do it over. Get it right.

Mostly, I want people to be as happy eating my food as I am cooking it.

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Just thought I'd drop in (and momentarily out of my crazy life) to pass on some comments and post a few recent meals.

Here's some of our recent dinners:

The fantastic cannelloni that David Ross posted awhile back. It was fantastic and delicious - my pictures are not as pretty as David's. I was so happy with the dish that I ordered the cookbook off abebooks.com:

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Kim, what a nice compliment. It is always great to have people try a dish or a recipe I've done and enjoy it as much as I do. Your cannelloni look wonderful. I'm thinking that it should now become a standard of my family's holiday celebrations. I think it would be a wonderful dish to come home to after a day out shopping or at some holiday activity. I am glad you liked it. Enjoy that cookbook. Yes, the book was published 45 years ago, but you will enjoy it immensely and you'll get some delicious recipes out of it. Thanks.

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Roast chicken, ala Bouchon

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With mashed, and green beans, steamed then tossed in butter, lemon and garlic.

gallery_6080_205_27989.jpg

And gravy of course

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Dessert was my four layer devils food cake

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Marlene-I just turned 50. I should have hired you to fly out West to prepare this EXACT meal for my birthday dinner. Wonderful.

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Coming from you, that's a huge compliment, thanks! (and I would have flown out too. Have butcher twine, will travel.) :biggrin: Happy birthday!

Edited by Marlene (log)

Marlene

cookskorner

Practice. Do it over. Get it right.

Mostly, I want people to be as happy eating my food as I am cooking it.

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Tonight was a Northwest menu with French accents. To start, a classic French bistro dish: Frisee Salad. I added some daikon sprouts to the salad and dressed it with an apple cider vinaigrette. I added applewood smoked bacon and these cute little quail eggs I found in the Asian market. I poached the quail eggs just for a few minutes so the yolks would still be soft and ooze into the salad. I normally make this type of salad with bleu cheese, but the cheesemonger at Whole Foods recommended I try some ricotta salata. She was spot on-the ricotta was salty and tangy, yet milder than a bleu cheese so it didn't overpower the other flavors in the salad. I sliced some Bosc pear for a sweet and crisp note to the salad.

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The main dish was a roasted rack of pork with a rub made from juniper berries, black pepper, sage, thyme and garlic. I'm partial to juniper, not only because I like gin but because our family ranch in Central Oregon had a number of juniper trees. The scent of juniper is something you never forget, and I think a perfect accent to pork. I served the pork with roasted fingerling potatoes, broccoli rabe and these huge, fresh chanterelles from Oregon. The sauce was a bit over the top-mustard cream-but the mustard was a nice tangy counter balance to the other rich flavors. Had a nice 2005 Oregon Pinot Noir from Maysara Vineyards of McMinnville, Oregon. Enjoy.

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I must've made some kind of noise when I looked at this picture, because my husband looked up and said "what are you looking at?"

I simply replied "I'm looking at porn again."

*sigh* That looks SO utterly delicious. I think I will have to find chocolate cake soon.

Marcia.

Don't forget what happened to the man who suddenly got everything he wanted...he lived happily ever after. -- Willy Wonka

eGullet foodblog

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My 10 year old made dinner the other night. ... she did a great job but I am hiding all the cookbooks from now on so she will stick to things that are a little easier (and allow us to eat before 10pm!!) - a few of the ingredients we didn't have so she made some modifications.

How wonderful! I love the second picture best, because her hair is a bit disheveled and she looks a wee bit tired, but her eyes and her smile show just how ecstatic she was about preparing the meal.

Did you help her at all, or did she do everything herself? That was quite a meal for a 10-year old. I certainly am not 10, and I don't even think I would make all that!

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There's some great look dinners (and desserts) here!

The other night I made panfried potato gnocchi with bacon, radicchio, and sage.

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And minestrone soup (which was dinner tonight, and will be lunch for a while to come).

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Dr. Zoidberg: Goose liver? Fish eggs? Where's the goose? Where's the fish?

Elzar: Hey, that's what rich people eat. The garbage parts of the food.

My blog: The second pancake

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Tonight was a Northwest menu with French accents.  To start, a classic French bistro dish: Frisee Salad.  I added some daikon sprouts to the salad and dressed it with an apple cider vinaigrette.  I added applewood smoked bacon and these cute little quail eggs I found in the Asian market.  I poached the quail eggs just for a few minutes so the yolks would still be soft and ooze into the salad.  I normally make this type of salad with bleu cheese, but the cheesemonger at Whole Foods recommended I try some ricotta salata.  She was spot on-the ricotta was salty and tangy, yet milder than a bleu cheese so it didn't overpower the other flavors in the salad.  I sliced some Bosc pear for a sweet and crisp note to the salad.

gallery_41580_4407_23091.jpg

gallery_41580_4407_60454.jpg

The main dish was a roasted rack of pork with a rub made from juniper berries, black pepper, sage, thyme and garlic.  I'm partial to juniper, not only because I like gin but because our family ranch in Central Oregon had a number of juniper trees.  The scent of juniper is something you never forget, and I think a perfect accent to pork.  I served the pork with roasted fingerling potatoes, broccoli rabe and these huge, fresh chanterelles from Oregon.  The sauce was a bit over the top-mustard cream-but the mustard was a nice tangy counter balance to the other rich flavors.  Had a nice 2005 Oregon Pinot Noir from Maysara Vineyards of McMinnville, Oregon.  Enjoy.

gallery_41580_4407_56086.jpg

gallery_41580_4407_64424.jpg

David, your rack of pork is absolutely beautiful! My mouth is watering.

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Tonight was a Northwest menu with French accents.  To start, a classic French bistro dish: Frisee Salad.  I added some daikon sprouts to the salad and dressed it with an apple cider vinaigrette.  I added applewood smoked bacon and these cute little quail eggs I found in the Asian market.  I poached the quail eggs just for a few minutes so the yolks would still be soft and ooze into the salad.  I normally make this type of salad with bleu cheese, but the cheesemonger at Whole Foods recommended I try some ricotta salata.  She was spot on-the ricotta was salty and tangy, yet milder than a bleu cheese so it didn't overpower the other flavors in the salad.  I sliced some Bosc pear for a sweet and crisp note to the salad.

gallery_41580_4407_23091.jpg

That is a beautiful salad!

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Tonight was a Northwest menu with French accents.  To start, a classic French bistro dish: Frisee Salad.  I added some daikon sprouts to the salad and dressed it with an apple cider vinaigrette.  I added applewood smoked bacon and these cute little quail eggs I found in the Asian market.  I poached the quail eggs just for a few minutes so the yolks would still be soft and ooze into the salad.  I normally make this type of salad with bleu cheese, but the cheesemonger at Whole Foods recommended I try some ricotta salata.  She was spot on-the ricotta was salty and tangy, yet milder than a bleu cheese so it didn't overpower the other flavors in the salad.  I sliced some Bosc pear for a sweet and crisp note to the salad.

gallery_41580_4407_23091.jpg

That is a beautiful salad!

Thanks, it is really easy to make. I left the skin on the pear, took out the core and then sliced it on a mandoline. You don't need to poach quail eggs-regular chicken eggs are fine. I just saw the quail eggs and thought they'd be fun to use for presentation. I poached them about 2 minutes. I think the thing that took the longest was simply frying the bacon and then cutting it up. Easy salad but great taste. Thanks.

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