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Dinner! 2005


EdS
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Bratwurst from a local butcher in Munich (Thanks Sabine), local Munich beer (thanks Sabine and for Boll for carrying it all that way.

Boiled spuds dressed with fried onions steamed broccoli and most important , a slather of English mustard.

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Edited by naguere (log)

Martial.2,500 Years ago:

If pale beans bubble for you in a red earthenware pot, you can often decline the dinners of sumptuous hosts.

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I really need a digital camera after looking at all these mouthwatering photos!

little ms foodie, your pictures in particular make me want to run to the kitchen!!

Last night-

Mixed greens with sliced pears and dried sliced figs, hazelnut oil and white wine vinegar dressing.

Penne pasta with portobello mushrooms, sirloin steak in a cream sauce with blue cheese.

Bonny Doon's Big House Red.

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Tamarind tom yum soup with Chinese long beans.

Then:

Mabo tofu with peppers and ground lamb.

Fried rice and barley with various mushrooms, onion, and Manphong roasted chiles.

Then:

Tandoori seasoned slow roasted (then seared) baby back pork ribs.

Warm flatbreads

Sweet and sour mango pickle with coriander.

"I've caught you Richardson, stuffing spit-backs in your vile maw. 'Let tomorrow's omelets go empty,' is that your fucking attitude?" -E. B. Farnum

"Behold, I teach you the ubermunch. The ubermunch is the meaning of the earth. Let your will say: the ubermunch shall be the meaning of the earth!" -Fritzy N.

"It's okay to like celery more than yogurt, but it's not okay to think that batter is yogurt."

Serving fine and fresh gratuitous comments since Oct 5 2001, 09:53 PM

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Bratwurst from a local butcher in Munich (Thanks Sabine), local Munich beer (thanks Sabine and for Boll for carrying it all that way.

Boiled spuds dressed with fried onions  steamed broccoli and most important , a slather of English mustard.

Wow Naguere are you in Munich? Ah yes now I know you are in England. I was thinking you had to be in Munich because of the blonde wood table. Anyway it looks scrumptious. Especially the beer. :smile:

Question about the sausage. How does it differ from the sausage you get at home? Seasonings, etc? :rolleyes:

Edited by bleudauvergne (log)
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To Heinz (legourmet): Where are you? That's a super enormous eclectic and interesting project of a meal. Tell me something about your monkfish, is it expensive where you live? Show me how you cut that shrimp to make it sit up like that. Second course, what is that in the middle between the fish/shrimp and the vegetables? Tell me how long you sat at the table, and how many guests you had. :smile:

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Bratwurst from a local butcher in Munich (Thanks Sabine), local Munich beer (thanks Sabine and for Boll for carrying it all that way.

Boiled spuds dressed with fried onions  steamed broccoli and most important , a slather of English mustard.

Wow Naguere are you in Munich? Looks scrumptious. Especially the beer. :smile: Ah yes now I know you are in England.

Question about the sausage. How does it differ from the sausage you get at home? Seasonings, etc? :rolleyes:

Well B I am located in Cheltenham England , hence my appreciation to Boll (my son) and the lovely Sabine who carried these delights from Munich.

The bratwurst differ in texture seasoning, taste and quality to the normal English sausage. The chilled traditional beer also added a certain something. :biggrin:

Martial.2,500 Years ago:

If pale beans bubble for you in a red earthenware pot, you can often decline the dinners of sumptuous hosts.

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penne with tomato sauce (onion and garlic much), including zucchini, chorizo, button mushrooms, jalapeno, a bit of cheddar. wow, tasty stuff, really really tasty. nothing like good home cooking.

"Bells will ring, ting-a-ling-a-ling, ting.... the bell... bing... 'moray" -John Daker

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Tonight I prepared a small beef brisket. Slow cooked (325 degrees) with dry onion/mushroom soup mix on both sides then wrapped in foil. Simple, but excellent. Also prepared a curry cauliflower dish, served some leftover peas from night before last, and a salad of bitter greens with a dressing of balsamic vinegar, olive oil, etc. Some refrigerator case biscuits rounded out the meal with peach/passion fruit preserves.

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Finally uploaded about several days worth of dinners:

Monday-

Roast chicken following the very first recipe in Bouchon. Made a reduced red wine sauce from the pan drippings

Steel cut oats with peas and plenty of butter

Dessert: Chocolate Souffle with Vanilla ice cream and berry sauce.

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Teusday-

Chicken fried rice. Used up the leftover chicken from yesterday's roast.

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Wednesday-

Picked up some Pho soup from a Vietnamese place on the way home from work.

Thursday-

Meatloaf

Mac and cheese

Dessert: Chocolate and banana crepes

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Elie

E. Nassar
Houston, TX

My Blog
contact: enassar(AT)gmail(DOT)com

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I am on a pasta kick this week.

goat cheese on crackers first, because I was starving. St Supery Sauvignon Blanc 2003.

sauteed some italian-style chicken sausage. Removed that from the pan, added oyster and shittake mushrooms, shallot, got those nice and soft, added canned tomatoes with juices, and some red wine (Bonny Doon's Big House Red, leftover from the night before), salt, pepper, thyme, and rosemary. Simmered for 20 minutes. Served over bucatini.

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Great value Spanish wine -- Mas Donis Barrica 2002.

Salumi and a ripe gorgonzola to start. Steak Au Poivre (roughly) from the Les Halles cookbook, with roasted cauliflower and cippoline onions agro-dolce.

Espresso and bought apricot tarts for dessert.

Grappa chaser, as always.

edited to add: Elie, that is one cute chubby chicken. But it is the mac n cheese/meatloaf meal that is really setting off a craving now. (I have simple tastes.)

Edited by Behemoth (log)
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finally gotten cold here and i am on a northern europe comfort food kick.

last night was maultaschen, rye bread and salad

tonight golumbki

tomorrow will probably be scotch broth - i have the lamb shoulder, 3 garlic cloves and an onion at a bare simmer. when done shred the meat, let the broth sit overnight and skim off. reheat the broth with barley and carrots, add the meat back and serve - childhood all over again. yum

Nothing is better than frying in lard.

Nothing.  Do not quote me on this.

 

Linda Ellerbee

Take Big Bites

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Another cold night in Vancouver. Been craving braised meat and red wine, so this was last night's efforts:

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Lamb Shanks braised with Chardonnay & Fennel.

The spice sachet for the braising liquid included fennel seed, orange zest & mustard seed. Reduced that after braisind and served with roasted carrots & pearl onions, and Israeli couscous (which I discovered is NOT prepared like regular couscous :blink: ). Wine was a 2002 Mission Hill 5 Vineyards Cab-Merlot - "big bottomed" with hints of cinnamon & chocolate ... which was good as we had chocolate hedgehogs for dessert.

The lamb recipe is from Vancouver Cooks, a terrific cookbook featuring some of this regions best chefs. This particular recipe came from Dana Reinhardt at Cru.

A.

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To Heinz (legourmet):  Where are you?  That's a super enormous eclectic and interesting project of a meal.  Tell me something about your monkfish, is it expensive where you live?  Show me how you cut that shrimp to make it sit up like that.  Second course, what is that in the middle between the fish/shrimp and the vegetables?  Tell me how long you sat at the table, and how many guests you had. :smile:

I live 10 miles from downtown Munich. What's an "eclectic project" when talking about food? In German language "eklektisch" means a collection of parts of different philosophic systems.

Monkfish is very expensive here. It's about 62 $ the kg or 30 $ a pound.

Shrimps: Cut through lengthwise 3/4 of the shrimp and the remaining 1/4 just to the middle along the testine. Don't remove the last part of the tail. Unfold, and place the inner part onto the hot pan, The shrimp sits up automatically like shown.

Second course: It's fried white asparagus.

It was a dinner for two. My wife and I sometimes like to have an extraordinary dinner at home with wines we like. We sat about 2 1/2 hours at the table. The preparation was about 6 hours, cooloing time not included. :rolleyes:

H.B. aka "Legourmet"

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Like Elie, I'm catching up and posting some of our dinners from the past week. BTW Elie, those meals looked sooooo good.

Our two weeks of clear days in the 80's seem to be over, and we've had a few days of rain. Even though it hasn't been cold, we've taken advantage of the opportunity to cook as though it has been. One night this week we had boneless pork chops; pan roasted apples, shallots, and prunes; and polenta with roasted garlic and mascarpone.

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Since Russ has been working on losing weight, we have cut back on portions and he's not taking seconds, or once in a while, we try some lower calorie recipes if it's one of those nights he wants quantity. Another night we had this "Creamy Asparagus Soup," which truly suprised us. We're used to putting cream in creamy soups. This had nonfat milk and nonfat sour cream. It tasted good! After the soup, I had a roast beef sandwich, and he had a little bit of roast beef with lettuce, tomato, onion, and horseradish with no bread.

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Last night I made up a braised rabbit dish, and a pancetta-shiitake mushroom sauce with a bouquet garni and just a touch of Dijon added to the pot, served with fettucine and peas and Rioja. Success!

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Tonight is Thai. The sticky rice has been soaking since last night. :wub:

Life is short; eat the cheese course first.

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Since Russ has been working on losing weight, we have cut back on portions and he's not taking seconds, or once in a while, we try some lower calorie recipes if it's one of those nights he wants quantity.  Another night we had this "Creamy Asparagus Soup," which truly suprised us.  We're used to putting cream in creamy soups.  This had nonfat milk and nonfat sour cream.  It tasted good!

My experience with soups is that, if you purée them fine enough, they will be creamy even without adding dairy. I make a carrot soup and throw in a potato or two (yellow Yukons or small white potatoes: never Russets). It adds body without adding fats.
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finally gotten cold here and i am on a northern europe comfort food kick.

last night was maultaschen, rye bread and salad

tonight golumbki

tomorrow will probably be scotch broth - i have the lamb shoulder, 3 garlic cloves and an onion at a bare simmer.  when done shred the meat, let the broth sit overnight and skim off.  reheat the broth with barley and carrots, add the meat back and serve - childhood all over again.  yum

I haven't had maultaschen in years!!! Can you send me a recipe?

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My experience with soups is that, if you purée them fine enough, they will be creamy even without adding dairy. I make a carrot soup and throw in a potato or two (yellow Yukons or small white potatoes: never Russets).  It adds body without adding fats.

I also do the potato thing or, sometimes, I will break pasta (usually spaghettini) into the pot. The starch from the pasta will add body too.

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tonight was choucroute/sauerkraut (is there an english word for this?) with mash, onion gravy and one of the last smoked pork sausages from the butcher shop where my father worked before his retirement. These sausages are SO great. I always had a steady supply of sausages coming to my house (when my mother came over, she would bring a sausage instead of flowers) but now, sadly, the butcher has ended his business.

I have only one sausage left in the freezer..

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made this meatloaf from the newest eating well :http://www.eatingwell.com/articles_recipes/recipes/recipes_febmar05.htm/meatloaf_blue_plate.html

really, really good - probably the best i've ever eaten  :wub:  :wub:

yellow and green squash

spinach cous cous

john had some 365 truffles from whole foods for dessert

Very similar to one that I thought I had improvised. I use 1 1/2 to 2 pounds of turkey and only 1/2 pound of what my butcher calls meatball mix (veal, pork, beef). After browning the onions, I add fresh mushrooms and saute until done. I haven't tried the beer, but will. Add egg, salt, pepper, parsley, mustard, bread crumbs, and sometimes a little red pepper (or crushed red pepper flakes) to liven up the turkey. After mixing and molding, I drizzle ketchup in a fancy (haha) design on top, and bake.

Everyone loves this.

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Made tamarind-glazed spicy pork chops in a green mole cream sauce. My first attempt at cooking anything with tamarind paste, and it's delicious. Roasted sweet potatoes on the side. All from Emeril's NNO cookbook.

...wine can of their wits the wise beguile, make the sage frolic, and the serious smile. --Alexander Pope

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