Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create a free account.

Dinner! 2005


EdS
 Share

Recommended Posts

While reading 'The French Laundry' today decided to make parmesean crisps with goat cheese mousse since we had everything

gallery_16100_231_438852.jpg

mmmmmmmmmm :smile:

dinner was grilled leg of lamb with Bengal spice rub and cucumber yogurt sauce, orzo pasta salad with feta and pan roasted brocoli

gallery_16100_231_451093.jpg (sorry about this photo, I can't get it rotated!)

Served with a Columbia Valley merlot

Link to comment
Share on other sites

From earlier this week, a Baeckeoffe type stew recipe from Alsace.

Lamb shoulder, pork shoulder, beef ribs and ox-tail were marinated in riesling with onions, thyme, juniper berries and cloves for 24 hours.

This was then layered in a pot. First a layer of potatoes and onions, then the meat:

gallery_1643_1231_715629.jpg

then another layer of potatoes:

gallery_1643_1231_840033.jpg

then the whole lot covered in the strained marinated and is sealed in the pot and put into the oven. This was cooked overnight at 100.C.

The result:

gallery_1643_1231_63412.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

"Wok & Stir-fry, Fabulous Fast Food with Asian Flavors" -- Green Shrimp Curry, p. 70.

gallery_28832_1138_53405.jpg

This is an amazingly quick meal, and has a fantastic taste, but you'd better be lovin' hot food, to wrangle with this one...

This is a kinda "low production value" book. In the credit section, it states that the front cover shows "Crispy Chinese Spriing Rolls" (sic), but in spite of being the sort of book you'll find in the bargain basket, it has a lot of good recipes.

Four comments:

-- This one is VERY spicy, so I advice you leave the chilies on the side.

-- I used a little extra coconut milk since the dish is so hot, but this left the green color of the sauce quite pale, and less appetizing. Can't be helped, I don't think -- unless I'm to add food coloring.

-- The sauce was quite thin, and I might consider adding a cornstarch-water slurry to thicken it.

-- I prefer to use lemongrass paste, rather than the actual stalks, which the original recipe calls for.

2 tbsp green curry paste

1 lb jumbo shrimp

4 shredded kaffir live leaves

2 tbsp lemongrass paste

1 cup unsweetened coconut milk

2 tbsp fish sauce

1/2 English cucumber, cut into thin batons (original recipe just calls for a regular cucumber, seeded -- but the English cucumber is far better, I think, and doesn't really need to be seeded).

10-15 basil leaves

4 sliced green chilies (I used two jalapenos and two small Thai chilies -- next time, I'll go all Thai, because they had a citrus-like flavor in addition to the heat, which really complemented to dish).

A lime.

gallery_28832_1138_37914.jpg

1. Start off by frying the curry paste.

2. Add shrimp, kaffir lime leaves and lemongrass, fry for a couple of minutes, until the shrimp starts turning pink.

3. Add coconut milk, and bring to a boil -- let simmer for about 5 minutes.

4. Add fish sauce, cucumber and basil.

5. Serve over rice, with chilies on the side, and a lime slice.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

So with the filets you have better results of the fire in tin foil? I figured I should do that but thought I wouldn't have a problem.

Just to be sure -- I didn't place the filet inside a foil pouch. I placed some tinfoil on the grill, away from the coals and oiled it, then I put the fillet on that.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Wendy, the parmesan crisps look so nice. You made it look as though they are easy, but are they? I've never made them.

Adam that looks like total delicious comfort!

After a few days of time-consuming cooking, last night we decided to end the weekend with an easy dinner. We enjoyed the Grilled Bread with Catalan Butter so much the other night, we made another batch of that spread, and had it as a starter; and then Russ made a pasta with a sauce of slow roasted tomatoes, sausages, and some other goodies we had on hand.

If I can eat dinner tonight (I might be drinking dinner instead), I'll have mashed potatoes and ice cream. Today I'm having periodontal surgery and I'll have stitches. Anybody else been through this ordeal and have suggestions for the possibility of a couple days of soft meals? This is a terrible thing to happen to a foodie. :sad:

Life is short; eat the cheese course first.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Susan the crisps are really easy! You just need a Silpat on a good baking sheet. We finely grated parm and used a 2 1/2" biscuit round as our guide. Spread the parm evenly and bake for about 10 mins. at 350F.

Using a spatula remove the rounds from the Silpat, they are hot and soft. Guide them into an egg carton to form a tulip and let them cool. Fill and eat!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Looks fantastic.  I wonder if I can make it with zero spice.  I have such a low heat tolerance.

Thank you very much! I don't have a particularly low heat tolerance, but I thought exactly the same thing myself, because it has an excellent taste -- however, I'm not completely sure how it could be done... You'd have to create your own green chili paste (which is where the most of the heat comes from). I don't see any good way of eliminating the fish sauce (it doesn't have any heat on its own, but it has a really severe taste, but adds a lot to the meal, taste-wise).

On the other hand, it might be as simple as reducing the amount of green chili paste. I guess I'll either do this, or try creating my own green chili paste, the next time. If I do, I'll be sure to add the resulsts here.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

If I can eat dinner tonight (I might be drinking dinner instead), I'll have mashed potatoes and ice cream.  Today I'm having periodontal surgery and I'll have stitches.  Anybody else been through this ordeal and have suggestions for the possibility of a couple days of soft meals?  This is a terrible thing to happen to a foodie.  :sad:

I suggest vodka the first night (worked for me) although the aftereffects aren't so great.

Otherwise, soup, including cold soups if it's nice there now, careful though, hot sauces/vinegars etc. stung the first few days. Poached eggs. Foie gras should go down nicely too! :hmmm:

Barbara Laidlaw aka "Jake"

Good friends help you move, real friends help you move bodies.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Susan the crisps are really easy! You just need a Silpat on a good baking sheet. We finely grated parm and used a 2 1/2" biscuit round as our guide. Spread the parm evenly and bake for about 10 mins. at 350F.

Using a spatula remove the rounds from the Silpat, they are hot and soft. Guide them into an egg carton to form a tulip and let them cool. Fill and eat!

One suggestion - use a little more cheese than you think you should - if you don't they can end up a little too delicate.

Bill Russell

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Susan the crisps are really easy! You just need a Silpat on a good baking sheet. We finely grated parm and used a 2 1/2" biscuit round as our guide. Spread the parm evenly and bake for about 10 mins. at 350F.

Using a spatula remove the rounds from the Silpat, they are hot and soft. Guide them into an egg carton to form a tulip and let them cool. Fill and eat!

One suggestion - use a little more cheese than you think you should - if you don't they can end up a little too delicate.

We used about 1/2 c. of grated cheese for 4 crisps

Link to comment
Share on other sites

If I can eat dinner tonight (I might be drinking dinner instead), I'll have mashed potatoes and ice cream.  Today I'm having periodontal surgery and I'll have stitches.  Anybody else been through this ordeal and have suggestions for the possibility of a couple days of soft meals?  This is a terrible thing to happen to a foodie.  :sad:

I suggest vodka the first night (worked for me) although the aftereffects aren't so great.

Otherwise, soup, including cold soups if it's nice there now, careful though, hot sauces/vinegars etc. stung the first few days. Poached eggs. Foie gras should go down nicely too! :hmmm:

Ice cream ice cream ice cream! Melted, if necessary. That is the whole point of having dental surgery.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I suggest vodka the first night (worked for me) although the aftereffects aren't so great.

Otherwise, soup, including cold soups if it's nice there now, careful though, hot sauces/vinegars etc. stung the first few days.  Poached eggs.  Foie gras should go down nicely too! :hmmm:

I'm home now, and I am in pain. Hopefully it will be easing up soon. I am getting into my jammies and settling down to do drugs and alcohol this evening.

Thanks for those food ideas. Cold soup, yes. I hadn't thought of that. Your advice about the vinegar and acidic stuff is well taken... I can tell already. I like your suggestion of the foie gras the best. I'll send my husband out for that right away. :biggrin: Now if only my insurance plan would cover that.

I can't have anything fizzy... no bubbles at all. They specifically told me no beer for a week, until I get my stitches out. :sad:

Warm salad of flageolet beans, tiny meatballs, sauteed shallots and lots of basil.

Served with gruyere/mustard toasts.

Leftover strawberry rhubarb pie for dessert.

Klary, as always your dinners sound so good to me! And now, with these restrictions, it all sounds better than ever. I am going to accumulate quite a list of things I want to eat.

Susan the crisps are really easy! You just need a Silpat on a good baking sheet. We finely grated parm and used a 2 1/2" biscuit round as our guide. Spread the parm evenly and bake for about 10 mins. at 350F.

Using a spatula remove the rounds from the Silpat, they are hot and soft. Guide them into an egg carton to form a tulip and let them cool. Fill and eat!

One suggestion - use a little more cheese than you think you should - if you don't they can end up a little too delicate.

Thank you both!

Life is short; eat the cheese course first.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

If I can eat dinner tonight (I might be drinking dinner instead), I'll have mashed potatoes and ice cream. Today I'm having periodontal surgery and I'll have stitches. Anybody else been through this ordeal and have suggestions for the possibility of a couple days of soft meals? This is a terrible thing to happen to a foodie. :sad:

susan - i almost lost john one year from an infection before he could have surgery.

your blender is your friend.

if you are up to it - stewed fruits with cream - blended. stewed fruits with ice cream - blended.

cooked spinach with garlic and potatoes with cream and broth - blended.

sweet potatoes with maple syrup and cream - blended.

ice cream stout floats topped with toast dope? :raz:

the best pot roast i have EVER done went into the blender. anything so john could handle it.

good luck and fast healing

Nothing is better than frying in lard.

Nothing.  Do not quote me on this.

 

Linda Ellerbee

Take Big Bites

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Susan- feel better soon, don't forget no straws at first (the sucking action isn't good for the stitches and can be painful) and in the meantime lots of soup and ice cream.

Last night of cooking before 10 days in Paris (with an aside to Barcelona)!

Can you believe that with all the good eating ahead I am actually going to miss not being in the kitchen? Hopefully, if my companions are willing, we can do some simple farmer's market cooking. It will be fun.

Anyway, I made chickpea dumplings in yogurt sauce (a very bastardized version of pakodi kadhi), and it was just wonderful. I boiled the dumplings and then simmered them in the spiced yogurt sauce.

Off to pack and clean out the fridge, out for ice cream later.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Tonight it was Kimchi chigae, oyster fritters, crispy fried tofu with hot and sweet sauce, and dry cooked string beans. Dessert, fresh appricots and peach. I also snuck in some pudding.

I got to get a digital camera.

Soup

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Lemon herb duck breast - a very nice idea from one of the recent NYT food sections that i've tried on blue marlin before and now on duck: you make a generous coat of lemon zest, parsley, garlic (used scallions tonight for a subtler flavor), rosemary and thyme and saute briefly until coating browns.

On the side roasted beets in Montegottero Vinaigre de Framboises - mind-blowing experience promised by Dan Barber realized although i couldn't help myself guilding the lily by adding some raspberries and sliced avocado.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thanks All for the dinner suggestions. I have some decent ideas now, and I do believe the blender will be my friend, especially today. I want to try pureeing roasted cauliflower!

All the posts sound so good. Jason, I had never seen tricolored couscous. That dish looked nice... the piece of broccoli on top set it off.

M., I know what you mean about missing the kitchen, even when you're taking a trip like that. I bet you will come home with a great many ideas of what to make upon your return. Have a good and safe trip!

I had a Wendy's Frosty and three servings of mashed potatoes for dinner (in that order :smile:), with Hydrocodone and Sauvignon Blanc. Not the best food & wine pairing ever, but it did the needed trick for me.

Life is short; eat the cheese course first.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Susan, another dinnersuggestion: hummus, made as liquid as you need it to be eaten succesfully :biggrin: with some stock. Cold ar warm whatever. Great comfortfood and a nice change from mashed potatoes.

edited to add: I recently made a salad of roast cualiflower and chickpeas, and was suprised how well these flavors went together. So maybe you could blend hummus with roast cauliflower? Ha, that would make a great soup, even for people who did not have dental surgery :hmmm:

Edited by Chufi (log)
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Anyway, I made chickpea dumplings in yogurt sauce (a very bastardized version of pakodi kadhi), and it was just wonderful. I boiled the dumplings and then simmered them in the spiced yogurt sauce.

Off to pack and clean out the fridge, out for ice cream later.

These sound tasty, would you mind sharing what's in the dumplings?

And have fun on your trip, it sounds fantastic! :biggrin:

Cutting the lemon/the knife/leaves a little cathedral:/alcoves unguessed by the eye/that open acidulous glass/to the light; topazes/riding the droplets,/altars,/aromatic facades. - Ode to a Lemon, Pablo Neruda

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Chicken breasts in a vodka-tomato-lemon-cream-chicken broth sauce

Rice/orzo with tons of parmesan (working girl's risotto)

Salad with KRAFT SEVEN SEAS GREEN GODDESS DRESSING!!!!

I love cooking with wine. Sometimes I even put it in the food.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest
This topic is now closed to further replies.
 Share

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...