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Dinner! 2012


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Beautiful dinner mm84321 i bet it tastes good as it looks!

Thanks. I forgot to explain, but one element in the dish was lasagna made from black trumpet and parsley. These were the ones I found in the woods earlier in the week. You lay them with parsley on one half of a sheet of pasta brushed with egg whites, then fold over the other half and run through the pasta roller again. It's a nice technique, and something you could use with pretty much anything that will lay flat.

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That process would make a lovely exterior for a large raviolo. Can't wait to try it.

Nick Reynolds, aka "nickrey"

"The Internet is full of false information." Plato
My eG Foodblog

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Wow great food in this thread, but I'm especially impressed by mm84321. Your food looks so inspiring and it's exactly the kind of stuff I hope to able to cook one day at my home.

Did you go to any culinary school for this or are you an autodidact?

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Franci – Quince looks great, would you mind describing? A friend is offering us a quince tree, so I would like to learn more.

Bruce, I love quinces, it's not just a great fruit for jams and jellies. But also very good with lamb or pork or with some cheese. Here it was paired with escalopes of foie gras and a ginger vanilla sauce ( from J. Mclagan Fat).

Tonight simple food.

Fried rice with sundried tomatoes and breaded pork tenderloin

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Franci – Thanks! Beautiful golden breading on your pork.

Continuing with the “use up stuff from the garden” theme. Surprisingly, younger son seemed to enjoy the mostly-meatless meal. He must have been hungry.

Fettucine and pesto with potatoes and green beans, with ricotta mixed into the pesto. I see much pesto in our future.

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Braised endive with prosciutto, with chicken stock and heavy cream

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rod rock – Thank you

Andrew – Pretty!

Peperonata – Continuing out quest to use up stuff from the garden . . . whatever largish, mildish chiles we grew this year, braised with red bell peppers, onion, anchovies, and red pepper flakes, and finished with balsamic vinegar, black pepper, and parsley.

Over pasta with cubed Andouille sausage.

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We've been discussing things that jiggle on your plate over in the Cook-Off, http://forums.egulle...ll-o-and-aspic/ here. One of my efforts was this appetizer of Foie Gras Mousse in Ice Wine Jelly with Huckleberry Compote-

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I'd have to say that it tasted pretty darn good.

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David, that's absolutely LOVELY. I had foie gras with huckleberries at a restaurant a couple years ago and was very taken with the combination. And I have a whole bush of huckleberries in the back yard right now...the wheels are turning!

If you ate pasta and antipasto, would you still be hungry? ~Author Unknown

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David, that's absolutely LOVELY. I had foie gras with huckleberries at a restaurant a couple years ago and was very taken with the combination. And I have a whole bush of huckleberries in the back yard right now...the wheels are turning!

Thanks, and go for it! I'll be excited to see what you come up with. We all cook a lot. We all eat a lot. But I'm sure we all have one thing in common--we know when we taste something that's very, very special. This dish is now in my small, exclusive collection of my own dishes that I'll put in "the best thing I ever ate" category.

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Peperonata – Continuing out quest to use up stuff from the garden . . . whatever largish, mildish chiles we grew this year, braised with red bell peppers, onion, anchovies, and red pepper flakes, and finished with balsamic vinegar, black pepper, and parsley.

Over pasta with cubed Andouille sausage.

Bruce - that looks delicious! I have a recipe for a similar dish that I haven't made in too long. Just need to get some red bell peppers. Thanks for the reminder!

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Grouse from Nebraska

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I hung it for a total of 4 days in the refrigerator.

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The breasts are removed, thighs reserved, and the legs, wings and carcass cut into small pieces. Half is marinated in whiskey for 6 hours. The other half is used to make a stock.

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After 6 hours, the legs, wings and carcass are drained from the whiskey and browned. Carrots and onions are added to this.

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The whiskey is then used to deglaze the pan, and all of the alcohol is burned off. The stock is then added, and this is allowed to simmer gently for 6 hours.

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Porcini (here I just used the stems) are cooked en papillote.

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They are then cut into a small dice and added to a mixture of the thighs, foie gras terrine, and lard. This is then bound together with a chicken farce, and a bit of the reduced jus made earlier. The breasts are marinated in whiskey for 30 minutes, then one is placed in a mold, with a layer of stuffing spread over, and topped with another breast. This is cooked at 54C for 1 hour 15. It is then removed and napped with the rest of the jus that has been thickened with pig's blood.

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It is served alongside mashed potatoes and potato chips.

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Edited by mm84321 (log)
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Heidih: I cheat a bit and use the sushi seasoning (vinegar already seasoned to my liking), sometimes an extra dash of vinegar, add loads of chopped fresh mint, "muddle" and ladle onto my lamb. I prefer the mint used in Mojitos. Don't care for spearmint or peppermint.

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Dejah

www.hillmanweb.com

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My first go at homemade montreal smoke meat . on light rye with homemade dills ..

there are a few adjustments to make but overall I am pleased for a first try

process

injected brine and soak for 3 days, fresh water soak for 12 hrs, spice rub in fridge for 3 days. 5hrs in smoker and 2 ½hr steaming.. brought to 190 *F

the smoke ended up a bit heavy I think a 3hrs would be good.I also need to rinse off the spice rub before smoking, and I think the cure needs a bit longer as there are places in the center that are more grey/brown than pink

"Why is the rum always gone?"

Captain Jack Sparrow

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When I first considered a dish of Sea Scallops and Pumpkin for a class I was teaching, I thought, "hmmn, I'm not so sure these flavor combinations will work." I was worried that the drive to put forth a pumpkin dish for the season was overpowering rational thought--does shellfish really go with pumpkin? Well, it worked. The sweetness of the scallops worked with the sweetness of the roasted pumpkin, (and a good measure of earthy roasted garlic). The sweet elements were contrasted with the tang of the vinaigrette composed of pureed pumpkin, toasted pepitas, apple cider and apple cider vinegar. And one element I never thought I'd use in this type of dish-stewed tomatoes. The old-fashioned flavor of canned, soft, stewed tomatoes worked perfectly. My fishmonger ordered the scallops for me--big brutes in the U-7 class. What a dream.

Seared Sea Scallops, Roasted Pumpkin, Toasted Pumpkin Seed Vinaigrette-

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