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ElsieD

"Artisan Bread Making" by Peter Reinhart

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Peter Reinhart has a video course on the web site Craftsy.com if anyone is interested. He gives over 5 hours of teaching under the following headings:

Lean dough, straight dough method,

Lean dough, pâté fermented method,

Rustic bread, pain a l'Ancienne method,

Sandwich bread and soft dinner rolls,

Marble rye bread, and,

Chocolate babka

I have watched all of the segments and really enjoyed them. I have several of his books but it sure was nice to see the breads demonstrated. The course is $40 and you are able to ask Peter questions. I have had several questions and they have been answered within a few hours. Whether Peter himself answers them or not I don't know but the answers do come under his name.

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I've just signed up. Only just started but it looks well done and quite professional.

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