Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create an account.

David Ross

Cook-Off 60: Banh Mi

Recommended Posts

rotuts   

smiley-money-mouth.gif.5e9eb18c6a0cc6dd9smiley-money-mouth.gif.5e9eb18c6a0cc6dd9Im now 3/4's stunned

 

good for all you

 

less of course for me

 

but well

 

they are pretty tasty in BOS chinatown

 

I do no were to go

 

no parking in the vacinity

 

and now, at 3 PM its 20 Big F degrees.

 

maybe Ill motor in on Sunday, in my SnowSuit

 

smiley-money-mouth.gif.5e9eb18c6a0cc6dd9

 

and get 2 or 3

 

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Anna N   

 But this topic is about making your own Bahn Mi not about buying them.  So is anybody making them? 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I wanted to give a background of my particular experiences with banh mi. I did post a pic of one I made, unfortunately couldn't find more of the pictures I was looking for. But I just found some more so here they are! This attempt was made with a Vietnamese "white" kimchi in place of the usual pickled vegetables. I also used a hollowed out French bread, and truffled pork and chicken pâté from fresh market. The meat is picked rotisserie pork ribs from the same.

image.jpeg.ab09f099f3ccbce800cb4d1fad8f4 

image.jpeg.3d5fb7e25345c9288d89354b9aff2image.jpeg.58041538eac1ad910484de601ea47

 

image.jpeg


Edited by tchefunkte Redundant photo (log)
  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Anna N   

Kudos!

 After a couple of attempts at the bread from Ngyuens book, I pretty much abandoned any further attempts. Suitable bread seems pretty scarce around here but I see on her site that she is suggesting some more easily found options so I might try again in the near future. If others are making the attempt I would love to hear.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Anna N   
26 minutes ago, tchefunkte said:

What book are you referencing?

Sorry.  Misspelled her name. Nguyen. The Bahn Mi Handbook. 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 hours ago, tchefunkte said:

I have loved banh mi since this, my first one, in NYC's Chinatown in 2006:

IMG_0772 (3).JPG

 

Here are some of the offerings of Duong Phong bakery and restaurant in the far east area of New Orleans. The banh mi sandwiches in the lower part of the picture are great, and cheap (sorry, no photos unwrapped). Not only do they have ,in my opinion, the second best banh mi in the NO area, but they also supply the bread to most of the other restaurants in town that have banh mi:

2013-06-08 12.59.54.jpg

 

My favorite banh mi in NO comes from Hong Kong Market on the westbank. They bake their own break as well and are also ridiculously cheap considering the quality of the sandwiches. As seen in the picture, their English isn't quite at the level of their sandwich making!

IMG_7974.JPG

 

Unfortunately, the only picture I have of an actual banh mi I made is one is one of my first attempts a few years back (a solid C-) :

2012-01-05 20.49.15.jpg


In recent years there have been a lot more restaurants offering banh mi, and presenting them with non-traditional fillings. A local food writer dubbed the vegetarian/Indian one at Pagoda Cafe one of the best dishes he had eaten all year:

 

"Indian Banh Mi with Phyllis’ green chutney, honey roasted beets, pickled and raw vegetables and arugula "

Thanks for the post.  I'll be in New Orleans next week and will try Hong Kong Market.  

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Banh Mi has been a favorite in our house ever since I first discovered Andrea Nguyen's Into the Vietnamese Kitchen. I make her carrot and daikon pickle, which is simple and so addictive! I have also made her char siu, as well as other recipes for that staple. I use a little Maggi in mayo for the spread, the usual sliced cukes, sprigs of cilantro and jalapeños to taste. If I don't have any fresh hot peppers I just squirt in some Sriracha.

 

For me, the whole idea of a sandwich is to make life a bit easier, so I don't make my own bread. My favorite bread is simply a good baguette. That's a bit crustier than the traditional roll, but there are such great baguettes here in the Bay Area to me it's a no-brainer. I can't imagine that a good baguette would stop anyone from eating a banh mi. Someone (maybe Andrea?) suggests using the Mexican bolillos, which are fresh and easily available if you have a big Hispanic market near by.

 

For the pate I rely on a very standard rather smooth chicken liver pate from my local fine foods market. Just not gonna make my own pate. I've used all kinds of meat besides char siu: grilled shrimp, bbq chicken, roast duck purchased in Chinatown. Once I made it with spicy Asian flavored pork butt, really pulled pork. All good! Most recently I used left over home made meatloaf and no pate and it was great. I have also used a coarse country-style pork pate and no other pate or meat, and that works too. The terrific thing about banh mi sandwiches is how versatile they are. If I could only take one kind of sandwich to a desert island, this would be it.


Edited by Katie Meadow (log)
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The pate! It's essential to me, but I was less impressed the fancier they were. I think we had a banh mi from HK Market and put half of it in a backpack for a long leisurely Lundi Gras trek around the city. It actually improved with age, and I'm pretty sure it was the earthy funk of the pate that helped segue us so effortlessly into the evening. And at those prices, they certainly ain't shmearing anything fancy on the sandwiches!

 

As a side note, a kitchen friend of a friend at La Provence in Lacombe gave us a tub of house made pate that tasted like pure meat butter, so delicious I couldn't put it down. Well actually I put quite a bit of it down, no banh mi substrate needed :D

 

The vietnamese pistolettes I'm familiar with are similar in consistency to NO style "french bread" like from Leidenheimers bakery. I would use that in a pinch over the denser ones I used in my experiments. Too heavy even with the guts pulled out. 

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I am currently cheffing at a vegan restaurant. I have made vegan bahn mi pizza, as well as full length sandwiches, and currently on the menu are bahn mi sliders. 

I love bahn mi. I think that the best place for bahn mi in Spokane, WA, where I currently reside is at Vien Dong on sprague. $2.75 gets you a choice of 1 out of 5 bahn mi. 

 

Back to my vegan bahn mi, and why I think that it rivals not only all other vegan bahn mi out there, but also many of the non vegan versions as well, and Ive tried just about every bahn mi place in the state, as they are my favorite sandwiches. 

 

Here is my procedure for any interested parties:

 

* Everything is made from scratch, which makes it a lot easier to control the variables in your favor *

 

Bread: I make my own bread which gets made to order per sandwich from refrigerated dough. The bread is roughly a 32 hour cold ferment sourdough which weighs 3.5-4oz. Baked at 500 degrees in a stone oven for roughly 4 minutes with a few sprays from the mister through out the first few minutes of baking for the perfect rise/ crust combination. 

 

"Pate" and Sauce: Light coat of spicy peanut sauce covered with light coat of garlic chili paste mayo. 

 

"Meat": chefs choice vegan roast (I prefer doing ham takes), sliced into medallions and well smoked over an apple wood/ cherry wood smoke. Afterwards marinated in a vietnamese flavored marinade with sesame seeds which will stick to medallions when retrieved from marinade before placement on sandwich. 

 

Veggie fillings: Julienned rainbow carrots, korean cole slaw, fresh cucumber, cilantro, random pickled vegetables. 

 

Its good. Its really good. The mouth feel of the bread is spot on. It has the crust and the crunch, and is very moist and chewy on the inside -although not so much the flake of a baguette-ish bread. Nearly impossible to explain the wild taste of the peanut sauce, but what I use it for is to replace that sticky, butteryness of a pate, aside from the fact that peanut anythings lends itself to many Asian inspired dishes, the sauce is also vinegary, spicy, and sweet. The mayo is a basic riff off of sriracha mayo, which still gives the user an option to add sriracha later on in the program. The meat component is superbly delicious, as just about anything which has been marinated, smoked, and then marinated further. Being a pickling freak, there always seems to be an overabundance of pickled things in every fridge around me. The cole slaw is a basic mayo based coleslaw with lime, soy sauce, and rice vinegar instead of the traditional good ol boy version. Fresh veggies bring it all together for that "AWWWW" comfy refreshing feeling inside.

 

Live well! Eat bahn mi. 

 

 

 

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Tri2Cook   

Is Banh Mi still Banh Mi without the pate? Because I've never eaten Banh Mi and would like to remedy that but anything involving liver isn't going to happen with me. For those tempted to tell me I can't really taste the liver among all those other flavors, I can almost guarantee you that I can. It's one of my very few food kryptonites and I've never found a form that could sneak by my taste buds.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Tri2Cook said:

Is Banh Mi still Banh Mi without the pate? Because I've never eaten Banh Mi and would like to remedy that but anything involving liver isn't going to happen with me. For those tempted to tell me I can't really taste the liver among all those other flavors, I can almost guarantee you that I can. It's one of my very few food kryptonites and I've never found a form that could sneak by my taste buds.

Most of the Vietnamese restaurants down here have pate free versions.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, Tri2Cook said:

Is Banh Mi still Banh Mi without the pate? Because I've never eaten Banh Mi and would like to remedy that but anything involving liver isn't going to happen with me. For those tempted to tell me I can't really taste the liver among all those other flavors, I can almost guarantee you that I can. It's one of my very few food kryptonites and I've never found a form that could sneak by my taste buds.

Another way to look at that comment is that if you can't taste the liver, then what's the harm in leaving it out? Life is short. Make a banh mi with foods you love. Traditional foods originated by way of what was available. Liver isn't available to you. I was far too lazy to get any pate for my meatloaf banh mi and it was delicious and was not missed.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 Agreed that you don't really need the pate if you don't have the taste for it.  I think the main thing is the bread roll, the meat and the pickled vegetables. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
rotuts   

the comments on liver vs pate are interesting.

 

I can't stand liver, i.e. saute, w bacon and onions etc  [ed.: there is a reason bacon and onions are usually added]

 

and I can't stand CkLivers and Schmnaltz.  Yuk +

 

however, pate, liverwurst ( elemental pate ) I love

 

I even used to make some tasty terrines myself back when.

 

I ususally saki for extra pate, which in my area is spread on.

 

go figure

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

  • Similar Content

    • By pastrygirl
      I was cooking for a party last night at which a gluten free cake was served for dessert.  I had a few bites and aside from the cake being dry and the frosting very sweet, there was that tell-tale grittiness that GF baked goods seem to have. This particular bakery uses a blend of millet, sorghum, tapioca and potato flours.  I used some Bob's Red Mill GF flour to satisfy a customer request for GF shortbread and found the same grittiness - they use garbanzo bean flour, potato starch, whole grain white sorghum flour, tapioca flour and fava bean flour. 
       
      Obviously some sacrifices of flavor and texture are made when trying to replicate the magic of gluten, but why can't these flour blends be softer?  Can't they be milled more finely?  Or is it just the way the particular starches or proteins in those other flours are felt on the tongue? 
       
      It's like that chalky cold cooked rice texture, do you know what I mean?  Why can't it be better?  Almost every time I eat something made with substitute flours, it makes me sad and want to fix it.
    • By Kasia
      Today I would like to share with you a recipe for a slightly different sandwich. Instead of traditional vegetables, I recommend strawberry salsa, and rather than a slice of ham – a golden grilled slice of Halloumi cheese. Only one thing is missing – a fresh and fragrant bread roll.

      Halloumi is a Cypriot cheese made with sheep's milk or a mixture of sheep's, goat's and cow's milk. It is semihard and so flexible that it is excellent for frying and barbecuing, and it is great fresh too.

      Ingredients (for two people)
      2 fresh rolls of your choice
      2 big lettuce leaves
      4 slices of Halloumi cheese
      2 teaspoons of butter
      salsa:
      8 strawberries
      half a chili pepper
      2 tablespoons of minced peppermint leaves
      ¼ a red onion
      2 tablespoons of chopped almond without the skin
      1 teaspoon of honey
      2 tablespoons of lemon juice
      2 tablespoons of balsamic sauce

      Start by preparing the salsa. Wash the strawberries, remove the shanks and cube them. Dice the onion and chili pepper. Mix the strawberries with the onion, chili pepper, peppermint and almonds. Spice it up with honey and lemon juice. Leave in the fridge for half an hour. Grill the slices of Halloumi cheese until they are golden. Cut the fresh rolls in half and spread them with butter. Put a lettuce leaf on each half of roll, then a slice of the Halloumi cheese, one tablespoon of salsa, another slice of cheese and two tablespoons of salsa. Spice it up with balsamic sauce. Cover with the other half of the roll. Prepare the second sandwich in the same way. Serve at once while the cheese is still hot.

      Enjoy your meal!
       
       
       


    • By Shel_B
      Not sure if the subject line really reflects the situation and my question.
       
      Sweetie made a couple of loaves of soda bread the other day, and cut the top of the loaf in order to make a pattern something like THIS.  However, the pattern or cut mark didn't show on the finished loaf.  I don't know much more other than she said she made the cut "pretty deep."
       
      What might be the cause of the cut mark not showing on the finished loaf?  Thanks!
    • By nonkeyman
       How to Make Rye Sourdough Bread
      I don't know what it is about bread, but it is my favorite thing to make and eat. A freshly baked loaf of bread solves a world of problems. I was lucky enough to get to be one of the main bakers when I worked at the Herbfarm. We baked Epi, Baguettes, Rolls, Pretzels and so much more.
       

      Rye Sourdough Wood Oven Baked Bread
       
      My fondest memory when I worked there was our field trip to the Bread Lab(wait something this cool came out of WSU, of course!) here in Washington. They grow thousands of varieties of wheat and have some pretty cool equipment to test gluten levels, protein, genetics and so on. I nerded out so hard.
       
      What came out of that trip was this bread. Now I can't recall the exact flour we got from them, but using a basic bread and rye will do the trick. We used to get a special flour for our 100 mile menu. This was where we were limited to only serving food from 100 miles away. So finding a wheat farm that made actual hulled wheat in 100 miles was a miracle. The year before...the thing we made, was closer to hard tack.
       
      Now if you don't have a starter, I recommend starting one! It is a great investment!
       
      Rye Sourdough
      1000 g flour (60% Bread Flour, 40% Rye)
      25 g salt
       
      75 g of honey/molasses
      200 g of Rye starter 
      650 g of water, cold
      Equipment
      Baker Scale (or other gram scale)
      Bench Cutter
      Bread Razor (you could also use one of those straight razors)
       
      Start by taking the cold water, yeast and Honey and mix together and let sit for 10-15 minutes
       
      I know, some of you just freaked out, cold water? Won't that kill the yeast.
       
      Nope, the yeast just needs to re hydrate. I prefer using cold water to slow the yeast down. That way the lactobacillus in the starter has  a good amount of time to start making lactic acid, and really get to flavor town!
       
      While that is sitting, I mix the flour and the salt together(How many times I have forgotten to salt the bread).
       
      Now mix the two products with a kneading hook for 3-5 minutes, only until thoroughly mixed but not yet at the window pane stage of kneading.
       
       
      Instead, place into a bowl and set a timer for one hour. Then when that hour is up, push the dough down and fold all the corners in
       
      Repeat this step 2-3 more times, pending on the outside temperature.
       
      If you happen to have those cool bowls to shape round loafs! Awesome, use them. I would break the boules into 3 balls of about 333 grams
       
      If not then just put the dough in the fridge and do the steps below the next day.
       
       
       
       
       
       
       
      Once you have bouled the bread, can put it into the fridge and let it sit over night
       
      Again, this lets the bacteria, really get to work(misconception is the yeast adds the sour flavor, nope, think yogurt!)
       
      Now on the next day, heat up whatever form of oven you plan to use. We used a brick oven but if you just have a normal oven, that is fine. Crank it to 450 degrees Fahrenheit.
       
      If you have not bouled your bread yet, go back and watch the video and break the dough down into three balls of abut 333 grams. Then place the balls on a lightly greased sheet pan. Let sit for about 45 minutes to 1 hour.

      If you have used the fancy bowls then turn the the bread out on a lightly greased sheet pan, without the bowl and let temper for 15-30 minutes.
       
       
      If your oven is steam injected, build up a good blast of steam.
       
      If not, throw in a few ice cubes and close the door or put a bath of hot water inside.
       
      The steam is what creates the sexy crust!
       
      Let it build up for a few minutes!
       
      Right before you put the bread into the oven use a bread razor to slice the top of the bread.
       
      Place the dough balls into the oven and douse with another blast of steam or ice and close the oven.
       
      Let them bake for 13 minutes at 450 degrees. Then turn the loaves and bake for another 10 minutes.
       
      Remove when the crust is as dark as you want and the internal temperature exceeds 190 degrees Fahrenheit.
       
      Now pull out and make sure to let cool off of the sheet pan with room to breath underneath. You don't want your crust steaming!
       
      Now here is the hardest part, wait at least 20 minutes before getting into the bread. Also, cutting into bread to early really seems to come out poorly. I would rip the bread until 1-2 hours has passed.
       
      Now serve it with your favorite butter, goat butter or whipped duck fat!
       
    • By Catherine T
      Hi, I have just discovered and registered on this site. My main cooking and baking concern is that I have been diagnosed with Celiac Disease and haven't been able to eat gluten. BUT I have discovered an exception. When I have visited Continental Europe such as Spain and Russia, I have been able to eat their bread and have had no negative repercussions. Then when I try eating bread in Great Britain and North America I have become sick. My research on the Web has not provided any explanations although I believe the EU has banned GMO grains. I was recently gifted panetonne from a Toronto restaurant called Sud Forno that uses Italian flour and I was able to safely eat it. Another bakery called Forno Cultura advertises that it uses European flour. So I am going to approach them to see if I can buy their flour in bulk. I will let you know how it goes.
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×