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DanM

Ceviche and Guacamole - Tortilla chip substitutes

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Guacamole and ceviche is for dinner tonight. I would prefer to avoid serving them tortilla chips as they dont have much nutitional value. Thinly sliced jicama, cucumber, and baby bell peppers come to mind. Does anyone else have suggestions?

Dan


"Salt is born of the purest of parents: the sun and the sea." --Pythagoras.

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Ummm, the traditional one? Which is to say, chifles.... If you've got an asian or latin grocery in your area, go out and get some green plantains. Peel 'em, then use your potato/carrot peeler to chip them into hot oil. Fry 'til golden, then drain.

Super yum.


Elizabeth Campbell, baking 10,000 feet up at 1° South latitude.

My eG Food Blog (2011)My eG Foodblog (2012)

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If nutrition is the concern you could certainly bake corn tortillas for chips. The corn tortillas themselves are a whole grain ad generally not prepared with fat. When I saw the title my mind went to the traditional ceviche vehicle - saltines - but that does not fit what you are seeking. Thin slice of potato or sweet potato baked with just a touch of olive oil might be enjoyable. I have also gone the lettuce cup route spooning both into romaine or butter lettuce leaves and eating taco style with a bit of extra salsa.

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Some times eating should just be fun. Not everything you put in your mouth should be measured by its nutritional value.

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As above, cut rounds from corn totillas and bake in the oven until crisp. Super taste. Cheap. Crispy. Can't be beat.


The Philip Mahl Community teaching kitchen is now open. Check it out. "Philip Mahl Memorial Kitchen" on Facebook. Website coming soon.

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Fried plantains are a good idea for the future, but with two ankle biters to manage, not very practical for today. I did pick up a small bag of plantain chips at the market though.

Lettuce is a good idea. I just bought a couple small heads from a farm stand this afternoon. Its not the ideal variety, but it should do just fine.

Fresh tortilla chips do sound like fun, but for another day. I need to experiment first, If my wife demands it, I picked up a bag of baked unsalted chips. Frankly, they taste like corn flakes to me. I think some guac or ceviche will make up for the flavor.

Luckily they did have some jicama and fresh cukes at the market, so those will be offered as well.

Dan


"Salt is born of the purest of parents: the sun and the sea." --Pythagoras.

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As to baked corn tortillas - I just put the tortilla directly on the oven rack. As long as you don't play with it and leave it until one side is crisped it does not stick. That way you get the heat all around. Flip and do the other side. When done just break them up as you eat - a simple no mess result that does NOT taste like corn flakes. I like them with a very corny tortilla like Trader Joe's.

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I'm also doing guacamole tonight--and I'm substituting "chips" with incredibly fatty, un-nutritional chicharones-fried pork rinds. It's very hard for me to find fresh pork fat back locally to be able to make homemade chicharones, but there's a very good Mexican market when I can buy a commercial brand that's pretty good. I like to warn the pork rinds in a 300 oven for about 15 minutes before serving them with chilled guacamole.

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David - yes really crunchy poky chicharones are fantastic with avocado and ceviche. Pictures if you can.

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I don't think ceviche is ever served with any kind of chip, is it?

I believe in some regions, Avocado is served in the ceviche - maybe just ditch the guacamole, and use the avocado in your ceviche?


Edited by Will (log)

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I really like the crispness of chips, so raw veg (while nutritious) doesn't do it for me. I think the plantain idea is great. If you want variety, thinly sliced taro and beetroot to the mix. For the guac, some fried yucca would be lovely.

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I'm confused as to why fried plantain chips would be more acceptable than fried tortilla chips? Both are mostly starch and deep fried. Personally, I have no objection to either, but I'm just trying to understand the logic here.

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I'm confused as to why fried plantain chips would be more acceptable than fried tortilla chips? Both are mostly starch and deep fried. Personally, I have no objection to either, but I'm just trying to understand the logic here.

Yes, they are both fried. But you are comparing the vegetables/fruits with tortilla, which is more than just corn.

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Plantains are a highly starchy food and I think it's a bit silly to say "Oh but it's a fruit so it must be healthier!" I happen to think that both corn and plantains can be a perfectly fine as part of a nutritious diet and I do not believe in low or no carb diets, so please don't feel I am saying plantains are unhealthy because they are starchy. It's just that it seems foolish to me to think that there is a major major difference between deep fried plantain and deep fried tortilla in terms of nutrition.

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I don't think there is a big difference and I'm not sure if others have implied that there is. But I do think it is more acceptable (which is what you stated in your first post) as you're comparing fresh vegetable to something processed.

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Fried plantain, Jenni, is much higher in various minerals, most notably iron and potassium, than fried tortilla; it's also got more soluble fibre (vs. tortilla's insoluble) and a significant amount of protein.


Elizabeth Campbell, baking 10,000 feet up at 1° South latitude.

My eG Food Blog (2011)My eG Foodblog (2012)

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I suppose you're talking about shop bought fried tortillas then? If we're comparing a factory made product with something freshly made at home with raw ingredients, then I would rather have the home made stuff, it's true. That wasn't explicitly stated in the OP's post so I didn't think of it. If we are just talking tortilla chips vs. plaintain chips then you're not comparing a fresh vegetable with processed food - you are comparing fried vegetable (well, fruit) with fried grain-that-came-from-a-plant-and-is-not-inherently-bad.

According to wikipedia, plantain has less protein and fibre than maize. It does have more potassium, vitamin a and vitamin c, but I don't know how well those things survive deep frying. Also, I think that's completely besides the point. We are talking about two starchy deep fried things, both tasty. Pick one and be happy to eat it, but don't kid yourself that you're making a hugely significant health decision.


Edited by Jenni (log)

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My initial point was also less about nutrition, and more about tradition and flavour.... (Although the plantain retains its potassium and vit a through the frying process - and I'd want to know which type of plantain was tested against the corn. The FHIA-types available down here are much higher in protein and soluble fibre than French Horn types, not to mention the Maqueño, which is the king of plantains and which also contains beta-carotene.)

My two cents? I'm always going to prefer fresh chifles (and I won't buy commercial ones - they're too easy to make and taste worlds better fresh than bagged) with ceviche, since as far as I'm concerned they're as much a part of the dish as fresh popcorn. I could no more do without them than without lime in the broth.


Elizabeth Campbell, baking 10,000 feet up at 1° South latitude.

My eG Food Blog (2011)My eG Foodblog (2012)

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For this guacamole I combined avocado, yellow onion, garlic, tomato, cilantro, lime juice, olive oil, salt, pepper, chili powder and chipotle powder. The chicharron's were heated in the oven at 350 for about 10 minutes.

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Maize, beans and squash - the plants grown in a mila provides a balanced diet. So bake your tortillas have some beans and squash and you will be following an old and very wise tradition.


The Philip Mahl Community teaching kitchen is now open. Check it out. "Philip Mahl Memorial Kitchen" on Facebook. Website coming soon.

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David - yes really crunchy poky chicharones are fantastic with avocado and ceviche. Pictures if you can.

This picture was taken at La Mesa de Blanca, in Ziracuaretiro, Michoacán, México. The chicharrones are made in-house and the avocados are from nearby groves.

I just couldn't resist. :biggrin:

IMG_6910.JPG


Buen provecho, Panosmex

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David - yes really crunchy poky chicharones are fantastic with avocado and ceviche. Pictures if you can.

This picture was taken at La Mesa de Blanca, in Ziracuaretiro, Michoacán, México. The chicharrones are made in-house and the avocados are from nearby groves.

I just couldn't resist. :biggrin:

IMG_6910.JPG

Now that is delicious.

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Inspired by a recipe in Nobu West I have been making a salad composed of paper thin tomatillos alternating with paper thin radishes (lightly dressed with 3/4 olive oil, 1/4 key lime juice, allspice & mex oregano) to form a wheel then you arrange ceviche blanco, smoked salmon & guacamole. Good summery main dish.

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