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Collins & Fizzes


FrogPrincesse
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I searched through the various threads and did not find one devoted to the Collins or its close relative, the Fizz. My understanding is that they both variations on the Sour with the addition of soda water. The Fizz is served up, while the Collins is served tall, on ice. There are many variations and I thought that it would be good to have one place to record them.

Here are some of the recent ones that I have tried.

The Derby Fizz (via Bartender's choice): rye, lemon juice, curaçao, egg white, soda water.

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I had a hard time getting this one to foam properly. It was not the nice creamy foam that I usually get with other egg white drinks. I wonder if my eggs were to blame (too fresh?). Taste-wise, it was a little bland.

The Ross Collins (via Bartender's choice): rye, lemon juice, simple syrup, orange slices, angostura bitters, soda water.

To prepare this drink, the orange slices are shaken with the rest of the ingredients (except the soda water of course), a technique similar to what is used for another one of Sam Ross' creations, Too Soon?. That has the advantage of extracting some juice together with aromatics from the zest.

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On paper, it did not seem like this would be too interesting. However the first sip revealed that it was a delicious and balanced drink, with each component bringing something to the overall flavor.

This weekend my husband and I went to Comme Ça, a restaurant in LA that has a bar program overseen by Sam Ross, and my husband ordered this drink again. Here is their version (with the orange wedge). They have the good ice and use a single long ice cube.

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The other drink with the lime wedge may be considered a loose variation on the Collins. It was called an Old Sombrero and contained tequila, cynar, lime juice, honey, egg white, soda water, and a mezcal rinse. It was smoky and a little bitter.

Edited by FrogPrincesse (log)
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I searched through the various threads and did not find one devoted to the Collins or its close relative, the Fizz. My understanding is that they both variations on the Sour with the addition of soda water. The Fizz is served up, while the Collins is served tall, on ice.

Speaking from a purely historical perspective the Collins is much more closely and directly related to punch, while the fizz is a more distant derivation even though they bear a striking structural resemblance. If you really want to get technical, the Collins, classically speaking, IS a punch--though due to its popularity and legion of variations it is now generally considered a category unto itself. Functionally, I'd say the fizz is a before noon drink (I love those) and the Collins is something best enjoyed between lunch and happy hour, to "cool the blood". Almost worth getting the blood all heated up just to partake.

Andy Arrington

Journeyman Drinksmith

Twitter--@LoneStarBarman

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Rum collins: 1 lime muddled with raw sugar, Cuban dark rum, shaken, strained over new ice, soda. The pith bitterness seemed to come through more than with lemon, but maybe because the lime was at its use-by date. Still refreshing.

I'm trying to figure out the right alcohol level. My initial mix with a bit over 1 1/2 oz rum was refreshing but the rum taste didn't quite come through. But more rum killed the brightness. I'm thinking white rum would be better or maybe (gasp!) no rum at all.

Aside: I dispair of my dwarf lime trees ever bearing fruit. I think I need to plant a lemon tree.

It's almost never bad to feed someone.

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A Hays Collins tonight (found on Bartender's Choice). It's simply a Tom Collins with an absinthe rinse.

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The absinthe rinse (I used pastis) alters the taste slightly. The finish changes from citrus to herbal, although it is subtle.

I like it a lot.

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Last night I made an Imperial Fizz with rye, Jamaican rum, lemon juice, simple syrup, egg white, and club soda.

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Smooth and spicy at the same time.

The choice of rye and rum could probably be fine-tuned. The flavor of the Bulleit rye came though, but the Appleton 12 was a little muted in that drink. A Jamaican rum that is a little more robust may be a better fit.

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My drink last night was an Eastside Fizz.

2 oz Plymouth gin

1 oz lime juice

3/4 oz simple syrup

handful mint leaves

3 slices cucumber + 1 thin slice for the garnish

club soda

Muddle the cucumber and mint with the gin, lime, and simple syrup.

Shake with ice, double strain, add club soda, float a thin cucumber slice as a garnish.

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Absolutely gorgeous drink. Right away it reminded me of Toby Maloney's Juliet and Romeo. It is a simplified version of that cocktail (without rose water, Angostura bitters, or pinch of salt). Even without these adornments, this is still fantastic. It tastes slightly salty; the mint, cucumber and Plymouth gin blended really well together.

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  • 9 months later...

I had a couple of nice fizzes lately.

This picture perfect Ramos Gin Fizz at 320 Main made by Shaun [with a delicious Trader Vic Mai Tai on the right]. Well worth the wait. Creamy with a gorgeous taste - subtle orange flower water, with the gin coming through. It will be tough to top that one off. Dave Stolte from Home Bar Basics summarized the technique in a detailed post on his blog.

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A Masala Fizz from Craft & Commerce. I've had it a tad creamier but this is a great brunch drink with chai-infused gin, sweet vermouth, lemon juice, egg white, and sparkling water.

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Edited by FrogPrincesse (log)
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Functionally, I'd say the fizz is a before noon drink (I love those) and the Collins is something best enjoyed between lunch and happy hour, to "cool the blood". Almost worth getting the blood all heated up just to partake.

Fully agree. Fizzes, especially the ones with eggs, make great brunch/lunch drinks while Collinses are for lazy afternoons...

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Dave Stolte from Home Bar Basics summarized the technique in a detailed post on his blog.

Thanks for this! I'm stuck in sick tonight and I made a Ramos following this technique and it turned out lovely. My one complaint is that only using one 1" Tavolo cube results in a drink that's not as cold as I like.

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”In Demerara some of the rum producers have a unique custom of placing chunks of raw meat in the casks to assist in aging, to absorb certain impurities, and to add a certain distinctive character.” -Peter Valaer, "Foreign and Domestic Rum," 1937

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  • 2 months later...

After the Eastside upthread and the Southside in the Mint thread, here is David Embury's Northside Special with dark Jamaican rum, (blood) orange juice, lemon juice, simple syrup, club soda. Very refreshing and interesting too.

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  • 4 weeks later...

Plum and pomegranate (pom) Collins .....

beefeater summer edition gin

pomegranate liquor

half a lemon

couple of plums

teaspoon of superfine sugar (abrasive)

Made this one up last summer

muddle lemon plums and sugar

ice

add gin + pom

shake dump enjoy.....

Sweet but that's my clientele

my 2c

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