Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create an account.

JAZ

Commercial mayonnaise – likes, dislikes?

Recommended Posts

Grew up with Miracle Whip - though how a girl from the east end of Long Island did we will never know.  About 3 years ago my sil made some macaroni salad - cooked macaroni and Cain's mayonnaise - for a picnic(hey never said she could cook - she was never allowed to growing up).  Well the taste blew me away.  More vinegary and citrusy than Hellaman's that, when I had tasted it, just felt like fat coating my mouth.

 

Unfortunately Cain's is not available in my part of the area - I have to get up to at least the mid to upper Hudson Valley of New York to be able to buy it.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Jaymes,

I am not much of a mayo fan but your father's use of it as a vehicle for testing new flavors appears to me to be quite brilliant.

 

Well, I do need to warn you that, like all experiments, some were more successful than others. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well, I do need to warn you that, like all experiments, some were more successful than others.

Of course. Nevertheless I think he was ahead of his time. I was in a store this week where they had a shelf displaying mis-named (as far as I am concerned!) aiolis. Sriracha aioli, wasabi aioli, etc., etc. There were quite a number of them.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

as I know, Im a big fan of the ---aise family.

 

Ive taken various dried Penzey's mixtures, added a tiny bit of water to say a Tbs to hydrate the dried herbs and deal with the salt

 

then added that to mostly mayonnaise for various veg.  I would have added to hollandaise and béarnaise but they didn't come in convenient jars.

 

but Ive done that w the CSB egg yolks ( mentioned in the fantastic CSB thread ) and all sorts of ---aise result

 

Sauer's  Prime Rib and Roast Seasoning

 

http://shop.cfsauer.com/products.asp?id=24

 

and Penzey's  ( original ) Chicago Steak Seasoning

 

https://www.penzeys.com/online-catalog/chicago-steak-seasoning/c-24/p-658/pd-s

 

 beet out the original béarnaise by several miles

 

as im not a big fan of tarragon.  it works in béarnaise because, as we know, the Egg Yolk is the Great Masquerader.

 

Penzey's has a Bavarian Seasoning  ( Slat Free ! ) ,

 

https://www.penzeys.com/online-catalog/bavarian-style-seasoning/c-24/p-19/pd-s

 

when mixed and hydrated w a little Mayo is fantastic on fresh steamed green beans !

 

Come on, steamed green beans ?  you eat 'em 'cause you got'em.  more or less.

 

not so w BavarianMayo.  just saying.

 

etc  etc.

 

if you are a Student of the ---aise family  give this a try.


Edited by rotuts (log)
  • Like 5

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

In Louisiana and on the east coast I preferred Blue Plate mayonnaise. Ive heen in AZ for foour years and don't know if the receipe has changed like most other things.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hellman's was my gold standard for many years for storebought, but now I would give  PC ( Presidents Choice) brand a slight edge.  My wife on the other hand doesn't really find any difference between most brands and buys whatever is on sale or the costco Kirkland brand .

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hellman's was my gold standard for many years for storebought, but now I would give  PC ( Presidents Choice) brand a slight edge.  My wife on the other hand doesn't really find any difference between most brands and buys whatever is on sale or the costco Kirkland brand .

I'm curious - what is it about the PC brand that you prefer? I haven't tried it although I really like most of their products.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I can't really think of the exact right words to describe the difference but brighter or fresher  somewhat fit the bill. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I can't really think of the exact right words to describe the difference but brighter or fresher  somewhat fit the bill.

Thanks. I'll try it when I finish the current bottle.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have to put in a good word for Kewpie. In Europe I've only been able to find Hellman's of the brands you've mentioned so far. I grew up with it and absolutely love it. However, Kewpie blew my mind. Not sure if it was the msg, but its taste was fuller and rounder than anything I've tried before... I don't remember where I found it and am dreading for the bottle to end!

  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hellmann's changed the formula for their mayo back in the mid 2000's, I think it was – so the memory of it from childhood versus what it tastes like more recently may not match.  See here for one web post relating to this...

 

-----------------------------------------------------

 

Regarding Kewpie mayo:

• The stuff made in Japan (like the squeeze bottle I have of it) does not list sugar as an ingredient, and the company's website also does not list it.

• The  company website and the label on my bottle lists the vinegar as "醸造酢" which really just means brewed or fermented vinegar, plus a parenthesized note that as I understand it means "including apple". As others have pointed out here (and from other websites), it uses rice vinegar (and/or apple vinegar).

• Only egg yolks are used in Kewpie, rather than the whole eggs used in all the others.

• The other stuff in it includes MSG (necessary for it to taste like Kewpie mayo :-)) but may also include dashi, if one goes by the "recreation attempt" in the article linked to below.

• No water is said to be added to it – implying that the other mayos have some added water?

 

Some articles relating to Kewpie mayo:

http://www.seriouseats.com/recipes/2013/10/sauced-japanese-style-kewpie-mayonnaise-recipe.html  (this one makes "Japanese style (Kewpie)" mayo; a mixture of rice + malt vinegars are used, plus MSG plus hon-dashi as well as using "Japanese mustard")

http://www.grubstreet.com/2012/02/kewpie-japanese-mayonnaise-cooking-dynamite-mussels-recipe.html

http://pogogi.com/story-behind-kewpie-and-its-ingredients-mayonnaise

http://pogogi.com/what-is-japanese-mayonnaise-and-how-is-it-different-from-american-mayo

http://justbento.com/forum/kewpie-mayonnaise#comment-5756

 

BTW Kewpie mayo is what is needed for okonomiyaki, not a Western/American style mayo.  :-) 

 

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This topic inspired me to try Duke's Mayonnaise last fall when I found it in a Texas grocery store.  I liked it.  I used it up. I think I did a side-by-side taste test of Duke's vs. Hellman's, my usual, but I can't swear to it. Nonetheless when we got home I began to check the Duluth grocery stores for Duke's.  I never found Dukes, but sometime this summer, this product began to appear in our grocery stores: 

 

20171011_162720.jpg

 

Piknik Real Mayonnaise.  Southern style, it says. Duke's is a southern style mayonnaise, and I liked it. I overrode my contempt for cutesy misspellings and bought a jar.  I like it.  It may replace Hellman's in our household, although I haven't yet done a side-by-side comparison.

 

My question is, what makes Piknik mayonnaise a Southern style mayonnaise?  The label implies that its lack of sugar is the qualifier.  Is that true? The label says it's made in Alabama, so technically it's a Southern mayonnaise regardless of its style.

 

Piknik lists its ingredients as: "vegetable oil (soy and/or canola), water, eggs, distilled vinegar and cider vinegar, salt, paprika, natural flavor, calcium disodium EDTA added to protect flavor."

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

@Smithy

 

very interesting

 

look at the portion of the label that gives amounts in grams

 

and then look at that same bit on Hellmans

 

love to see the differences

 

BTW

 

TJ's used to have a TJ's Mayo

 

maybe they still do

 

Ill pic one up if I remember.

 

it was outstanding in the sense that it had a Lot of Egg flavor.

 

and thus very rich.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I said it way up thread but will repeat. If you are not making your own I love Trader Joe's Organiic. Not because it is organic, but for taste and strong eggy note- not just a filller item. 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, rotuts said:

@Smithy

 

very interesting

 

look at the portion of the label that gives amounts in grams

 

and then look at that same bit on Hellmans

 

love to see the differences

 

 

Hellmans:

20171011_205231.jpg

 

Piknik:

20171011_205154.jpg

 

The Piknik has proportionately less egg than the Hellman's and has no sugar.  The fat, oil and vinegars are different.  Eventually I'll get around to a side-by-side taste test.

 

My real question is: what makes Piknik a Southern-style mayonnaise?

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
7 hours ago, Smithy said:

My real question is: what makes Piknik a Southern-style mayonnaise?

 

No sugar is my vote. And the ingredients on your Piknik brand are pretty close to the jar of Duke's I just pulled out of my fridge to compare.

 

Duke's ingredients:

Soybean oil, eggs, water, distilled and cider vinegar, salt, oleoresin paprika, natural flavors? :unsure:, calcium disodium EDTA added to protect flavor.

 

My jar lists The C.F. Saurer Co., Richmond VA, but this wiki article says it originates in Mrs. Eugenia Duke's sandwich shop in Greenville, SC in 1917.

 

I love it, and it is as good as homemade. My only gripe with it is that it's hard to find it around here in less than a quart jar so I can't use it before it goes off. I did manage to buy a 16 oz. jar last time, so I have a better chance of getting use out of it. It was only 25 cents cheaper than the jar twice the size. *Sigh*

 

@Kim Shook may have some thoughts as well on what constitutes a Southern mayo, and I'm pretty sure she is a Duke's fan.

 

Remember ya'll Julia Child never told any of us to put sugar into mayonnaise! xD  She was a very wise woman, in my worldview. 

 

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Excuse the rumpled dress but my Hellman's seems to be the tiniest weeniest bit different to yours, with the mustard and paprika bit - perhaps they are identical but your label gets to use the more secretive 'natural flavors' ?

 

mayo.thumb.jpg.2d00af4b54e806b4b6ab748825d5f671.jpg


Edited by CantCookStillTry (log)
  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, CantCookStillTry said:

Excuse the rumpled dress but my Hellman's seems to be the tiniest weeniest bit different to yours, with the mustard and paprika bit - perhaps they are identical but your label gets to use the more secretive 'natural flavors' 

 

mayo.thumb.jpg.2d00af4b54e806b4b6ab748825d5f671.jpg

 

Full disclosure is always really good in my book, but Antioxidant (385)? WTH is that supposed to be? Possibly calcium disodium EDTA? Gotta love our various government's avoidance of truth, or NOT. Sheesh!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
57 minutes ago, Thanks for the Crepes said:

Full disclosure is always really good in my book, but Antioxidant (385)? WTH is that supposed to be? Possibly calcium disodium EDTA? Gotta love our various government's avoidance of truth, or NOT. Sheesh!

 

I don't think it's avoidance of truth but more a love for abbreviations and acronyms :D, and not just by our government in the US - this is a European-based naming convention.

 

International Numbering System for Food Additives 

Quote

The International Numbering System for Food Additives (INS) is a European-based naming system for food additives, aimed at providing a short designation of what may be a lengthy actual name. It is defined by Codex Alimentarius, the international food standards organisation of the World Health Organisation (WHO) and Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) of the United Nations (UN). The information is published in the document Class Names and the International Numbering System for Food Additives, first published in 1989, with revisions in 2008 and 2011. The INS is an open list, "subject to the inclusion of additional additives or removal of existing ones on an ongoing basis"

 

And yes, 385 is indeed calcium disodium EDTA, itself an abbreviation for ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I came across Piknik a few years back in a little store on the south side in a neighborhood where there were several businesses run by refugees from Katrina who stayed on here in Houston.  I seem to remember something claiming it was a favorite in New Orleans, but that may have been for one of the other products I'd never seen here before.  I remember being surprised it was made in Alabama.  They had Cheewees and Louisiana style hot sausage and some other products, a lunch counter with po'boys and fried chicken (neither very impressive). I'm perilously low on  Duke's and I think I'm up to try a new product.  I'll try to get back over there.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hellmann's has changed in recent years. Lots of old fans bitch about it.

I wish I could find a good prepared mayo without, sugar, soybean or canola oil.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 10/12/2017 at 5:33 AM, Thanks for the Crepes said:

 

No sugar is my vote. And the ingredients on your Piknik brand are pretty close to the jar of Duke's I just pulled out of my fridge to compare.

 

Duke's ingredients:

Soybean oil, eggs, water, distilled and cider vinegar, salt, oleoresin paprika, natural flavors? :unsure:, calcium disodium EDTA added to protect flavor.

 

My jar lists The C.F. Saurer Co., Richmond VA, but this wiki article says it originates in Mrs. Eugenia Duke's sandwich shop in Greenville, SC in 1917.

 

I love it, and it is as good as homemade. My only gripe with it is that it's hard to find it around here in less than a quart jar so I can't use it before it goes off. I did manage to buy a 16 oz. jar last time, so I have a better chance of getting use out of it. It was only 25 cents cheaper than the jar twice the size. *Sigh*

 

@Kim Shook may have some thoughts as well on what constitutes a Southern mayo, and I'm pretty sure she is a Duke's fan.

 

Remember ya'll Julia Child never told any of us to put sugar into mayonnaise! xD  She was a very wise woman, in my worldview. 

 

Yep, I'm a Duke's girl.  May be habit as much as anything - it was what my grandmother always used.  I actually grew up on Miracle Whip and there are still some recipes that I use it in.  But I don't care for the sweetness of it with most stuff.  I love homemade mayo, but use so little of it and hate to throw it away.  I'll make my own when I know I'll be using a lot.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My whole life I've been using Hellman's or, on the west coast, Best Foods. I tried Duke's recently and admit it's very good. The overall taste is a bit sharper and saltier and it is a little less stiff, but I like it. Surprisingly when I checked the sodium levels Duke's has a bit less. So with Hellmans/Best Foods, you are getting added sugar and more salt to up the flavor. 

 

I'm not too keen on soybean oil or canola oil, but it seems you can't get commercial mayo without it. Using better quality oil would mean raising the prices, and Americans guzzle up so much mayo that would be a deal breaker. Am I too lazy to make my own? Yep. 

  • Like 2
  • Haha 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

  • Similar Content

    • By sartoric
      I make this a lot. Traditionally served with dosa, but great with all kinds of Indian food, even just scooped up with bread or pappads for a snack. Although it's slightly different every time, depending on the tomatoes and chillies used, plus the strength of the tamarind, it's easy, quick to make and always delicious.
       
      In a blender - half a medium red onion chopped, 7 dried red chillies broken up a bit, 2 ripe tomatoes chopped, 1 tsp of sea salt, 3 tsp tamarind paste.

       
      Whizz until purée like about 2 minutes.

       
      In a sauté pan over medium heat add 60 ml sesame oil (gingelly), when it's hot but not smoking add 1 tsp black mustard seeds.   

       
      Quickly cover the pan to prevent escape and sizzle for a minute.

       
      Add 1 tsp of urad dal (black lentils, skinned and split they are light grey).

       
      Fry until golden, another minute or so.

       
      Throw in about 20 curry leaves. These splatter so cover the pan again. 

       
      Lower the heat and add the  blender contents.

       
      Simmer, stirring frequently for about 10 minutes, until you get a runny jam consistency.
       
      Ta da !

    • By HoneyMustard
      Pennstation's Honey Mustard taste so good, but they don't sell it in stores like Big Boy Frisch's sells their tartar sauce.

      I am assuming they buy it in bulk from a certain name brand. Does anyone know what that brand is or at least a similar Honey Mustard recipe?
    • By Darienne
      Pannukakku has become a new favorite in the McAuley household. (LCBO Food & Wine, winter season 2016).  We've been using Maple Syrup...made with DH's help in a local sugar shack...but the recipe actually calls for birch syrup.

      Does anyone know where to buy it in Ontario?  Any grocery stores carry it?  Specialty stores?  Toronto? What about in the Cambridge/Kitchener/Waterloo area?
       
      Thanks.
    • By cyalexa
      Salsa Para Enchiladas  
      3 ancho chiles
      2 New Mexico chiles
      2 chipotle chiles
      1 clove garlic, sliced
      2 TB flour
      2 TB vegetable oil
      1 tsp vinegar
      ¾ tsp salt
      ¼ tsp dried oregano
      2 cups broth, stock, or (filtered) chili soaking liquid
      Rinse, stem and seed chiles. Place in saucepan and cover with water. Bring to boil. Cover and remove from heat and let soften and cool. While the chiles are cooling, gently sauté garlic slices in oil until they are soft and golden brown. Remove the garlic from the oil, with a slotted spoon and reserve. Make a light roux by adding the flour to the oil and sautéing briefly. Drain the chilies and puree them with the garlic slices and half of the liquid. Strain the puree back into the saucepan. Pour the remainder of the liquid through the sieve to loosen any remaining chili pulp. Add the roux to the saucepan and whisk to blend. Add the rest of the ingredients to the pan, bring to a boil then and simmer 15-20 minutes. Taste and add additional salt and vinegar if necessary.
    • By Jambalyle
      Hi!
      Before we launched our project, I followed Melissa's remodel thread (congrats Melissa) and links to other kitchen remodel threads and I am continually awed by the inspiration and recommendations offered by the eGullet community during those projects. I want to get a piece of that action during our remodel.
      Demolition began on June 20, with an estimated 6-month project duration. The impetus for our remodel was the addition of a master bedroom and bath to transform our tiny 2 BR 1 BA into a modest 3BR 2BA. In addition, we are transforming and expanding the back of the house to create a "great" room that will combine a new kitchen, dining and family room.
      I will post plans and initial pictures in a subsequent post to give everyone a sense of the scope of our project. But first...
      Yesterday, we met (again) with our kitchen designers and appliance people to hammer out our appliance wants, needs, and desires. Here is where we netted out:
      Range – Wolf 48” R486C (6 burner, grill), w/ Island trim (is trim necessary?)
      Hood – Independent 27” x 54” Incline INHL54SS (w/ heat lamps)
      Blower – Independent CFMR1400 (external)
      Dishwasher – Miele Platinum edition G2150SCSS
      Microwave – GE Monogram 1.0 CF Stainless ZEM200SF
      Refrigerator – GE Monogram 42” built-in Stainless w/dispenser – ZISS420DRSS
      Beverage Center – GE Monogram 24” Stainless ZDBC240NBS (we're not willing to pay $600 more for privacy glass feature!)
      Sink – Franke 30”x18”x9” Stainless under mount
      Anyway... we would love to get some reaction to our selections before they hit the SOLD key on the cash register! Thanks! -Lyle
      PS: I know the Wolf is wimpy at 16,000 BTU per burner, but are there other reasons I should reconsider?
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×