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A bit of a double update.

First of all, the entire first series with English, French or Spanish narration is now officially viewable online here.

Secondly comes the good news that a second series is in post-production and will be aired in early 2014.

http://liuzhou.co.uk...china-series-2/

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I want to try that hariy tofu. looks great.

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Coming into this late...(but that just means I can get the english subtitles! :raz: )

Thanks for the links. This is fantastic!

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China Central TV have now released a seven DVD set with official subtitles in English, French, Spanish and Portuguese.

It comes with a copy of the book (Chinese only) and costs ¥146.

Can you suggest an online vendor where to buy it? Thanks!

Teo

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Can you suggest an online vendor where to buy it? Thanks!

Try Amazon here!

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it turns out my library system has several copies of both the DVD and Book !

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Thanks to China Odyssey Travel....that we went to China with....for the heads up on the English narrated version.

Haha! They got it from me!

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Just was watching the Staple Foods episode.....all those rice buns and noodles. I want to try making simple noodle wrappers....I think Asian Dumplings might have a recipe. We tried to make them in Vietnam....where they steam them on a piece of fine cloth (voile?) over a pot of water. Harder than it looks.

Thanks for letting us know about this series...it is SO good.

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Reminds me of why I love Chinese food so much. The mushroom hunting scene reminds me of something straight from Lord of the Rings

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China Central Television have announced that the second 7-part series of A Bite of China will be broadcast nationally during the upcoming Spring Festival (Chinese New Year) which begins on January 31st 2014.

Titles of the episodes are Seasons, Steps, Heart, Family Life, Secrets, Meetings, and Three meals.

No doubt, they will slide out of China thereafter, as did the first series, then be officially released..

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Well, on Friday night (18th April),  China Central Television finally got round to showing the first episode of Series II

 

(It didn't happen as promised in the post immediately above - don't know why.)

 

They also seem to have changed the running order. Episode one is "Steps".

 

But what is important is that, so far, the quality is just as Series 1. Stunning.

 

So far, it's only in Chinese but no doubt a English narrated version will turn up one day. It took about two years for Series 1.

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I have started a thread on the Bite of China recipe book here.

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I just watched Series 2 Episode 6 - Secret Places. First broadcast last night.

 

It is stunning. Brought tears to my eyes and I even saw a good friend. Sitting in a restaurant eating, as usual.

Only one more episode to go. 

 

Be patient. It will appear with English in time.


Edited by liuzhou (log)

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I am now the happy possessor of all 7 episodes of Series 2 (in Chinese only)

 

They are all stunningly excellent, especially the last two episodes. The best food documentary ever.

 

Look out for them!

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Hello from Paris,

 

I have found some pieces of the BOC2 documentary which might interest some people:

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ns1gQQpBxHg (a preview in English)

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0G_MSrzLREY  (episode #1 with English subtitles)

 

http://ninchanese.com/a-bite-of-china-season-2/ (episode #1 with no subtitles)

 

http://www.ovguide.com/tv_season/a-bite-of-china-season-2-259364 (supposed to be episodes #1-4, with #5-7 to come but I am unable to visualize them: maybe someone on this forum can navigate better than I...)

 

Have a good day, G

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This is the same pattern as that with the first series.

 

The episodes appear one by one on YouTube etc with amateur subtitling. It isn't the greatest translation, but enough to let you follow the program. 

 

Later, when the DVDs are issued, the official translations will appear, then later still, versions with English voice-over. Then it will be streamable from the CCTV website.

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The Chinese only version of Series Two is now available on DVD. It comes come on 8 discs - one each for all seven episodes plus a bonus edition of the making of the series (with some extra footage).

 

dvd.jpg

 

If they are following the example of the first series, which seems likely, the dubbed version should appear in time for Christmas. 


Edited by liuzhou (log)

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I'm starting to watch some subtitled versions on youtube, so excited!

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I just heard, to my surprise,  that series 3 has been completed and is about to be broadcast. I'll add any info I get as to dates, etc.

 

mmexport1519045141894.jpg.be4da0e2f2b897b9a336445c468e285e.jpg

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Unfortunately, YouTube has removed all the videos of series 3 for copyright reasons*. This is most unusual, but may mean that CCTV (China Central Television) may be planning to stream them in the future - as they did with  series 2.

 

* Please note, I didn't upload them. Nothing to do with me!

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CCTV (Chinese Central Television) has now officially posted  the trailer for  series 3 on YouTube.

 

With luck, they will later post the full episodes as they have done with previous series.

 

 

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