Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create a free account.

High end chef's coat?


ScottyBoy
 Share

Recommended Posts

So I'm a bit of a diva, yes. The coats I've ordered from 2 different websites (Happychefuniforms and Chefuniforms) just aren't quite up to par. Since I work in people's homes I would like to look the best I can. Anyone have experience with ordering top quality coats?

Thanks in advance.

Sleep, bike, cook, feed, repeat...

Chef Facebook HQ Menlo Park, CA

My eGullet Foodblog

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I have mine custom-made by a bespoke chef's tailor down here (although for reasons other than yours - I'm simply much longer of arm in proportion to the chest measurement than most Ecuadorians, and finding something off-the-rack that fit me was impossible). You might want to investigate having a jacket custom made, if you're not adverse to spending a tidge more on your presentation jackets.

Elizabeth Campbell, baking 10,000 feet up at 1° South latitude.

My eG Food Blog (2011)My eG Foodblog (2012)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Ah, yes. I'm sure there has to be a tailor around the Bay Area for chefs.

Edit: After poking around I found the Culinary Classics website. Seem like very nice coats but $$$! Will invest and write it up for others looking for a fancy coat.

Edited by ScottyBoy (log)

Sleep, bike, cook, feed, repeat...

Chef Facebook HQ Menlo Park, CA

My eGullet Foodblog

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I second Bragard, I had one for a while until it got lost in the laundry. Felt like a cool afternoon breeze was gently kissing my skin every time I wore that baby... How I miss her...

The perfect vichyssoise is served hot and made with equal parts of butter to potato.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Peter, are you arguing that in ScottyBoy's position you don't think he should be worried about how his coat looks?

I believe that the gear is part of the job. If looking good is important, then it may be better to invest in something more superficial, at a lower cost. If your concern is over protection then you pay more for it, but you have to live with the idea that it's going to take some damage over time.

Generally, given the above conditions, if appearance is important, than you're better off to buy cheap and disposable, and give yourself that "just pressed look". If you want the battle-hardened look, then you invest in something to keep ( but it may not be cost effective).

I've found that, over time. it's better not to get attached to equipment. It's cheaper that way.

Cheap is good.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Just my opinion, but I expect that here in southern California people would expect ScottyBoy to show up at their house looking like an expensive diva. And the more expensive he looks the more he can charge them.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Good Chef's coats are double breasted for a reason: For good presentation, you quickly unbutton, and then button up on the "good side". For working away, a bib apron is effective, again, for presentation, it's just a quick removal of the apron, tuck the bib down, and tie it back on for a "regular" apron.

Cheap coats are cheap, best used for "messy days" when you know you'll be getting dirty.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 5 weeks later...
 Share

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    • No registered users viewing this page.
×
×
  • Create New...