Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create a free account.

Scallions


Recommended Posts

I bought a massive bunch of large, thick scallions at the farmer's market today. Any suggestions on scallion happy dishes, especially if they are vegetarian?

Thanks!

Dan

"Salt is born of the purest of parents: the sun and the sea." --Pythagoras.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes, great grilled. Yesterday I did a saute of equal amounts scallion and pencil asparagus- all cut about 3" in length. Roasted garlic and its oil as was the fat. Ate the whole pan myself with just salt and pepper. Would have been great with a poached egg.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Molly Stevens's Braised Scallions. Sometimes it takes a blog post to prompt me to make a recipe I've had access to for years. I made the braise and then turned the scallions into a dressing for pasta--I thought the shape would mimic the shape of linguine or fettucine well, and it did. I don't remember exactly what I did, but I think I added some other alliums (garlic, leek maybe). It was very good.

Just don't be fooled by the person in the comment section who says that the scallion roots are good! The bunches I bought when I made this had beautiful juicy looking roots, so having read that I was pretty excited to try them. I carefully saved and washed them, and prepared them separately (roasted). They were terrible! I am pretty sure I spit out the one I tasted.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Scallion pancakes is something that hits me in the heart every time!

Do you have a good recipe for them? I'm still on the hunt for anything as good as I used to eat at Ying Chow in Adelaide

8 C unbleached white flour

4 C cold cold cold water

1 bunch scallions

1 small red onion

pinch of salt

pinch of 5-spice powder

oil for frying.

Chop the scallions and onion very finely, sautee in a bit of oil with a pinch of salt and 5-spice powder until the onions are just browned and tender. Set aside to cool.

Prepare the dough by adding the water to the flour gradually (you may need more or less water depending on your flour). What you want is a smooth, strong dough.

Roll the dough out into a large rectangle, about 24 x 30 inches and 3/8" thick. Sprinkle with the scallions and oil, then dust with a bit more 5-spice powder.

Roll the dough into a log from the wide end. Cut 2" sections (these are your pancakes).

Twist each section into a ball (forming layers of dough and scallion), then roll out into flatter rounds, 8-10" across.

Fry in hot oil about 5 minutes to a side or until they start to brown up, flipping only once (but keep 'em moving in the oil so that they don't stick.)

Serve with ginger soy and chili dipping sauce.

Elizabeth Campbell, baking 10,000 feet up at 1° South latitude.

My eG Food Blog (2011)My eG Foodblog (2012)

Link to post
Share on other sites

Pan Can... I found this recipe and guide for scallion pancakes, which will be served orange tofu and sauteed bok choy (also from the farmer's market).

http://www.seriouseats.com/2011/04/the-food-lab-how-to-make-scallion-pancakes-chinese-appetizers.html

Does that look about right to you?

"Salt is born of the purest of parents: the sun and the sea." --Pythagoras.

Link to post
Share on other sites

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pajeon

"It is a pancake-like Korean dish made from a batter of eggs, wheat flour, rice flour, green onions, and often other additional ingredients depending on the variety. Beef, pork, kimchi, shellfish, and other seafood are mostly used. If one of these ingredients, such as squid, dominates the jeon, the name will reflect that; oh jing uh jeon is 'squid jeon.'"

It's crispy, hearty, batter-y, and soaks up the soju like a champ :biggrin:

Link to post
Share on other sites

Pan Can... I found this recipe and guide for scallion pancakes, which will be served orange tofu and sauteed bok choy (also from the farmer's market).

http://www.seriousea...appetizers.html

Does that look about right to you?

That's the right techique alright! I've never tried with a hot water dough; with my experience with cold-water doughs I've always been able to get a very fine product - it's part of what the slice'n'roll technique does.

Elizabeth Campbell, baking 10,000 feet up at 1° South latitude.

My eG Food Blog (2011)My eG Foodblog (2012)

Link to post
Share on other sites

Scallion pancakes is something that hits me in the heart every time!

Do you have a good recipe for them? I'm still on the hunt for anything as good as I used to eat at Ying Chow in Adelaide

In next few days i will wrote down recipe from a friend and i will post here for you and others that are interested in them.

"The way you cut your meat reflects the way you live."

Franchise Takeaway

Link to post
Share on other sites

Pan Can... I found this recipe and guide for scallion pancakes, which will be served orange tofu and sauteed bok choy (also from the farmer's market).

http://www.seriouseats.com/2011/04/the-food-lab-how-to-make-scallion-pancakes-chinese-appetizers.html

Does that look about right to you?

That's pretty much how I make them. Except I've always done them by hand, and poured the boiling water over the flour, letting it rest before mixing, and only rolled and coiled once. Medium heat is absolutely the way to go. I have frozen them before cooking to cook later. If you only partially defrost before cooking they come out not too badly.

Double rolling and using the processor is a great idea.

I tend to use either peanut oil or lard for the fat component, and I sprinkle with salt before rolling up with the scallions. I also like a lot of scallions in mine, but you need to be careful to not let them break through.

Also, champ is a delicious thing to eat!

Edited by Snadra (log)
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 9 months later...

Sorry if this is a bit of a stupid question by I often find that scallions are required for certain dishes in Chinese cooking. This is what I found on the web:

Scallions are most commonly referred to as green onions in the United States. They are a variety of young onions with a long, thin white base that has not yet developed into a bulb and long straight green stalks that look like giant chives.

http://homecooking.about.com/od/cookingfaqs/f/faqscallions.htm

That description would fit what I would call 'Spring Onions' or even 'Leeks' here in the UK. Does anybody know what they're called in the UK or what I substitute them with? Thanks.

Link to post
Share on other sites

They are indeed spring onions. Not leeks.

Thanks for your reply Simon but I sometimes see them mention Scallions and Spring Onions in the same recipe so they must be differentiating somehow.......

Link to post
Share on other sites

The terms are generally used interchangeably here (they would nearly always be called scallions in a supermarket, for example) and I've always considered them one and the same, but some googling suggests you might be correct about the difference:

http://archives.record-eagle.com/2007/may/21onions.htm

http://www.harvesttotable.com/2008/05/spring_onions_green_onions_and/

I'm out of my depth, apparently, so I'll leave it to those more knowledgeable to respond.

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...