Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create an account.

Kerry Beal

eG Foodblog: Kerry Beal and Anna N (2012) - Mixing it up in Manitoulin

Recommended Posts

Morning all - it's a lovely temperate morning here in Little Current on lovely Manitoulin Island. Anna's in the kitchen making something - I'm sitting enjoying my first very large mug of tea of the day.

DSCN5199.jpg

This is my brown betty in it's dutch tea cosy - the better to keep my tea nice and warm for a number of hours.

DSCN5202.jpg

My tea - in the largest mug I could find at the Value Village in Sudbury a couple of years ago. I love my tea, but I'm lazy and don't like to go back and forth to the kitchen several times to get enough - so this is a ceramic beer mug and holds the equivalent of several cups. I can get about 2 1/2 of them out of my 6 cup brown betty. And don't let the 'fabulous father's hall of fame' fool you - I'm female. (I find on eG it's sometimes hard to figure out who's male and who's female based on their names and mine's a boy's name anyway)

DSCN5206.jpg

My view off the balcony while I post.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

So I was in the kitchen making my breakfast. Lovely farm-fresh eggs (sorry one got broken when I tried to get it onto the plate!) and a sliced portobello mushroom. Drink of choice is coffee from my single serve Keurig.

breakfast may 13.jpg

Will have much more to say as I become fully awake and coherent.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I come up to Manitoulin to work a few times a year these days - and Anna decided to join me this trip. It's an opportunity to cook relatively uninterrupted unlike at home. Hubby and child are fending for themselves (well with two weeks of food prepared before I left).

Sorry the teasers were a little misleading - we figured if we posted chocolate or calamari that everyone would get it in one - but there is significance to the pictures.

First the egg cartons - for anyone who has noticed that we sometimes post about the food we are cooking when I'm up here - there are always wonderful farm fresh eggs involved. One of the public health nurses brings me eggs - usually as many and as often as I like. Apparently racoons got into the henhouse recently and she lost a lot of chickens and has a number now suffering from post traumatic stress disorder and failing to lay well - so eggs are a bit more scarce - but she was able to bring me 6 dozen the day after I arrived. We have been saving egg cartons at home for her - after a couple of dozen uses we find the egg cartons just don't hold up like they should!

DSCN5150.jpg

I think the chickens that lay my favourite green eggs must be slow runners.

I grabbed a copy of Momofuku for Anna a couple of months back - and to her surprise she was totally taken by it. I had been eyeing the Milk Bar Cookbook for a while and we decided that this trip she'd cook from her book and I'd cook from mine. It seems to be the way anyway - Anna doesn't really like to bake the way I do.

Of course a trip to Manitoulin is never complete without bringing along a few kitchen toys to try out that I haven't gotten around to firing up in the city. So this trip we have the new ultrasonic to play with Nathan's french fries. I also have a little cotton candy machine that I bought at a store that was relocating in Buffalo - so we can have a little fun with that too.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hello Kerry and Anna,

I'm looking forward to reading what the two of you cook up. And I'm curious about your new cotton candy machine. Used to love cotton candy when I was a kid. Should be a good week. :smile:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Of course we always bring up a bunch of cookbooks along with the various toys - this trip I brought the Gentleman's Companion Volumes 1 & 2. This is the first chance I've had to read them even though I bought them last year some time and I'm finding them terribly amusing. I'm getting some great ideas for cocktails and trying to figure out if there is anything in the 'Exotic Cookery Book' that I can make while here. So far a Honey Mousse looks doable - requires half a dozen fresh eggs and some quality dark honey to which I have access. (Got to try to avoid ending sentences with prepositions!)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Of course we always bring up a bunch of cookbooks along with the various toys - this trip I brought the Gentleman's Companion Volumes 1 & 2. This is the first chance I've had to read them even though I bought them last year some time and I'm finding them terribly amusing. I'm getting some great ideas for cocktails and trying to figure out if there is anything in the 'Exotic Cookery Book' that I can make while here. So far a Honey Mousse looks doable - requires half a dozen fresh eggs and some quality dark honey to which I have access. (Got to try to avoid ending sentences with prepositions!)

Never tried anything out of the GC but it IS a really fun read. Interested to hear reports!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

After breakfast I vacuum packed meat that we bought yesterday. Some went into the freezer but the rib steaks found their way directly into our sous vide set up:

SV1.jpg

sv2.jpg

Here is the refrigerator when we arrived:

DSCN0969.JPG

And this morning:

fridge4.jpg

Shortly I will post the photos of the kitchen as we arrived and once we settled in!

Edited to fix typo.


Edited by Anna N (log)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

DSCN5215.jpg

A couple of weeks ago the Ladies Who Lunch found this little pressure cooker at Value Village. The price was $9.99 and we had a 30% off coupon for anything we bought that day!

Handle was loose and when I fired it up it was clear that it wasn't working as it should - so a couple of days ago we took the handle off and discovered that it was seriously gunked up with something akin to the greasy stuff that forms on the bottom of cast iron frying pans. We put the ultrasonic cleaner to work on some bits, but without any good solvent it only helped a bit. So we resorted to boiling some of the bits with dishwasher detergent and then elbow grease. It is a european pan made by Fagor so I'm hoping I can get a new handle for the top somehow. It's working but it steams more than it should and it loses pressure really quickly when it comes off the heat.

DSCN1000.jpg

The first thing I cooked in it were some lemons - Alex and Aki at Ideas in Food blogged about Pressure Cooked Citrus a while back and I decided this would be a good thing to try. I took a couple of nice lemons, added a bit of water and cooked until they were pooped and the liquid was starting to thicken up. I then made a puree with this in the Thermomix.

DSCN5208.jpg

So breakfast for me this am was some plain Liberté Méditerranée yogurt with a bit of the lemon puree and drizzle of some nice honey. I couldn't find any grape nuts or anything in the cupboard to add a little bit of crunch.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Here are some photos of the kitchen in pristine condition when we arrived:

clean 1.JPG

CLEAN 3.JPG

GIFT BASKET.JPG

There is always a gift basket waiting for us. This one contained a gift certificate to a coffee place, a loaf of fruit and nut bread, a hard-ripened goat cheese (not yet tasted) and a jar of baked cherry tomatoes from Spain. Not sure how we will use this yet!

cleaN 2.JPG

And today:

KITCHEN 13 2.JPG

KITCHEN 13 3.JPG

KITCHEN 13 4.JPG

Edited because I was too fast on the trigger and posted before it was complete. Might have something to do with my Sunday morning coffee with its cognac spike.


Edited by Anna N (log)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The other day I started on my first Milk Bar Cookbook recipe - the Blueberries and Cream Cookies.

Not a resounding success!

DSCN0993.jpg

The dough was very soft and did not look anything like the picture in the book - and of course RTFM is not in my vocabulary so I neglected to see where it suggested an overnight refrigeration.

DSCN0996.jpg

First baked tray.

DSCN0998.jpg

Tray from overnight in the fridge - still not what I would consider a success. They got eaten quickly at work - but I found them too cloyingly sweet and I was not happy with the texture.

Today I'm working on a batch of the Corn Cookies - brought up a big can of freeze dried corn that I picked up from a survivalist/camping store in Mississauga. Yummy stuff eaten right out of hand!

DSCN5211.jpg

Ground it in a coffee grinder.

DSCN5212.jpg

This is just my egg, butter and sugar mix - this is one of the fresh eggs - the yolk was like a Manitoulin sunrise! I must confess to having started to change the recipe already - I feel it is fair because I've made one of her cookie recipes before! So I cut back the sugar to 2/3 of the original and added 6 drops of lemon oil to the dough. The dough tastes great.

DSCN5214.jpg

I'm actually going to put these in the fridge for at least an hour before baking as per the instructions - though looking at the stiffness of this dough I suspect I could bake them right away. I've added some of the freeze dried corn kernels to a couple of the dough balls - I suspect they will prove quite interesting in there.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I spotted the ThermoMix. Im hoping to see how you use it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Those who have helped us out on our Help for a Couple of Cocktail Novices thread will recognize the first two pictures. These are the bottles we started out with up north last summer when we were cocktail naive.

DSCN3598.jpg

DSCN3600.jpg

We have branched out a little - this is what we have available to use now.

DSCN5216.jpg

Don't be disturbed by the specimen bottles - they all started out clean and sterile! They contain small amounts of such things as Vya, Carpano Antico, curacao and falernum.

Note the bottle of Lakka - Finnish cloudberry liqueur. We picked this up at the LCBO in Pointe au Baril on the way up. I'd never seen it before - and my internal magpie kicked in. It's quite yummy - not sure if I can describe the flavour - it's unlike any other liqueur I've had before - but having eaten salmonberries before when I lived in the Queen Charlotte Islands there is a familiarity for me. We are working on a couple of cocktails with it - coming up with names then working backwards to the cocktail.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

DSCN5219.jpg

I think it's fair to say that these cookies didn't really need time in the fridge. And they probably needed to be flattened as well (oops - just RTFM and apparently I was supposed to flatten them). The second tray I did flatten and let warm up a bit before baking and they were a bit better - but still not as pictured in the book.

The book is quite specific about how long the butter, sugar etc should be beaten - I wonder if perhaps that might make a difference.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

DSCN5223.jpg

Anna sous vided (sous ved) the rib eyes we picked up at Costco in Sudbury yesterday. I gave them a quick brown in the nice hot mini Big Green Egg. Anna also roasted some green beans in the oven for a nice crunchy side. Of course since this is lunch - part of the steak will be saved for tomorrow's lunch munchies - but the all important photograph must be taken first.

DSCN5224.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Funny how that happens with the booze cabinet. I swear they breed in there, surely I didn't buy as many bottles as I seem to have now.

I haven't been too happy with the Milk Bar recipes I've tried. They sound good on paper but never seem to deliver what I think they should.

Anyway, look forward to seeing what you two get up to this week.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Terrific photos. I'm really looking forward to this week. Those eggs are lovely.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

So excited to see this blog! How the heck do you get through six dozen eggs before they go bad?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

So excited to see this blog! How the heck do you get through six dozen eggs before they go bad?

Eggs go bad?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

So excited to see this blog! How the heck do you get through six dozen eggs before they go bad?

Eggs go bad?

I'm wondering about that also. I have some jumbo eggs in my fridge from late February, still good, used some this morning.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well, that small Green Egg is interesting.

What's the diameter of it? Green to Green?

many thanks!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Eggs definitely go bad! I speak from unfortunate experience!

That steak looks soooo good! I'd use the leftovers to make yum neua. I've had a craving for it forever, but have yet to make it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well, that small Green Egg is interesting.

What's the diameter of it? Green to Green?

many thanks!

The mini has a 9 inch grill - think green to green is probably 13 inches or so.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Eggs definitely go bad! I speak from unfortunate experience!

That steak looks soooo good! I'd use the leftovers to make yum neua. I've had a craving for it forever, but have yet to make it.

Yum neua?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest
This topic is now closed to further replies.

  • Similar Content

    • By KennethT
      OK, I'm back, by popular demand! hehe....  After being back for 2 days, I'm still struggling with crazy jetlag and exhaustion - so please bear with me!
       
      This year, for our Asian adventure, we went to Bali, which for those who don't know, is one of the islands in Indonesia.  Bali is a very unique place - from its topology, to the people, language, customs, religion and food.  Whereas the majority of people in Indonesia are Muslim, most people in Bali are Balinese Hindu, which from what I understand is a little like Indian Hinduism, but has more ancestor worship.  Religion is very important to many people in Bali - there are temples everywhere, and at least in one area, there are religious processions through the street practically every day - but we'll get to that later.
       
      Bali has some food unique to it among its Indonesian neighbors, but like everywhere, has seen quite a bit of immigration from other Indonesian islands (many from Java, just to the west) who have brought their classic dishes with them.
       
      Basically all Indonesians speak Indonesian, or what they call Bahasa Indonesia, or just Bahasa, which, anyone who has read my prior foodblogs wouldn't be surprised to hear that I learned a little bit just before the trip.  Unfortunately, I didn't get to use any of it, except a couple times which were totally unnecessary.  When speaking with each other, most people in Bali speak Balinese (totally different from bahasa) - many times when I tried using my bahasa, they smiled and replied, and then tried to teach me the same phrase in Balinese!  As time went on, and I used some of the Balinese, I got lots of surprised smiles and laughs - who is this white guy speaking Balinese?!?  Seriously though, tourism has been in Bali for a very long time, so just about everyone we encountered spoke English to some degree.  Some people spoke German as well, as they supposedly get lots of tourists from Germany.  As one of our drivers was telling us, Bali is heavily dependent on tourism as they have no real industry other than agriculture, which doesn't pay nearly as well as tourism does.
       
      While there are beaches all around the island, most of the popular beach areas are in the south of the island, and those areas are the most highly touristed.  We spent very little time in the south as we are not really beach people (we get really bored) and during planning, decided to stay in less touristed areas so we'd have more opportunities for local food... this didn't work out, as you'll see later.
       
      So, it wouldn't be a KennethT foodblog without photos in the Taipei airport and I-Mei Dim Sum, which we called home for about 4 hours before our connection to Bali...
       
      Beef noodle soup:

       
      The interior:

       
      This was the same as always - huge pieces of beef were meltingly tender.  Good bite to the thick chewy noodles.
       
      Xie long bao (soup dumplings) and char siu bao (fluffy barbeque pork buns):

    • By KennethT
      Recently, there was a thread about stir frying over charcoal, which immediately brought to mind memories of eating in Bangkok in July 2013.  At that time, I hadn't gotten into the habit of writing food blogs, and considering that I had some spare time this weekend (a rarity) I figured I would put some of those memories down on paper, so to speak.  Back then, neither my wife nor I were in the habit of taking tons of photos like we do nowadays, but I think I can cobble something together that would be interesting to folks reading it.
       
      In the spirit of memories, I'll first go back to 2006 when my wife and I took our honeymoon to Thailand (Krabi, Bangkok and Chiang Mai), Singapore and Hanoi.  That was our first time to Asia, and to be honest, I was a little nervous about it.  I was worried the language barrier would be too difficult to transcend, or that we'd have no idea where we were going.  So, to help mitigate my slight anxiety, I decided to book some guides for a few of the locations.  Our guides were great, but we realized that they really aren't necessary, and nowadays with internet access so much more prevalent, even less necessary.
       
      Prior to the trip, when emailing with our guide in Bangkok to finalize plans, I mentioned that we wanted to be continuously eating (local food, I thought was implied!)  When we got there, I realized the misunderstanding when she opened her trunk to show us many bags of chips and other snack foods.. whoops...  Anyway, once the misconception was cleared up, she took us to a noodle soup vendor:


      On the right is our guide, Tong, who is now a very famous and highly sought after guide in BKK.... at the time, we were among here first customers.  I had a chicken broth based noodle soup with fish ball, fish cake and pork meatball, and my wife had yen ta fo, which is odd because it is bright pink with seafood.  I have a lime juice, and my wife had a longan juice.
       
      This is what a lot of local food places look like:

       
       
    • By Smokeydoke
      Greetings eGulleteers, I'm Smokeydoke and I'll be your tourguide for the next seven days on a culinary journey through Las Vegas.
       
      First a little about me, I'm a foodie first and foremost, but my real name is Kathy and to pay the bills, I work as an Engineer. My husband works at UNLV. In the past I've worked as a manager for a pizzeria and worked at a bakery. We live in the Southwest community of Las Vegas, more commonly referred to as Mountains Edge.
       
      Here is the obligatory shot of our kitchen. Sorry for the bad photos, I made a video but just realized I can't upload videos in eGullet, so I quickly converted them to jpegs.
       
            
       
      Here's my pantry#1, with my (in)famous shelf of twelve different types of flours. Below that are my oils, vinegars and sauces. And of course, pounds of TJ Belgium chocolates.
       
        
       
       
    • By sartoric
      We’ve just returned from a fun filled 16 days on the beautiful island of Sri Lanka. The food was fantastic, the people friendly, the markets chaotic, the temples serene, the mountains breathtaking, the wildlife plentiful and the weather ? Well, you can’t have everything, it was mostly hot, and at times very wet. 
       
      Why Sri Lanka ? We loved time spent earlier this year in southern India, especially the food. Sri Lanka lies just off the southern tip of India and has been influenced over time by various invading Indian dynasties.  Often referred to as the spice Island, it’s been an important trading post for centuries. Other countries have also played their part in shaping Sri Lankan cuisine. The Portuguese arrived in the early part of the 16th century, the Dutch gained control in the 17th century, the British had control by 1815, and independence was proclaimed in 1948. Throughout these years, Chinese traders also contributed to the evolution of Sri Lanka. 
       
      So, what’s the food like ? Delicious !
       
      Our first night was spent at a homestay in the coastal city of Negombo. All day the rain bucketed down. It was difficult to go anywhere else, so we asked our hosts to provide dinner. Good move ! 
       
      The rain let up long enough for a quick quick visit to the fish market, the first of several we’d see.

       
       
      Our hostess made 10 different dishes including a mango curry where I watched her pluck the fruit from the tree in the front yard. There was sour fish curry,  chicken curry, dal, several veggie curries, chutney, two rice and roti bread. The meal cost 900 rupees pp, or about $6. Gosh it was good. Lousy photo, some better ones to come.

       
    • By Duvel
      “… and so it begins!”
       
      Welcome to “Tales from the Fragrant Harbour”!
      In the next couple of days I am hoping to take you to a little excursion to Hong Kong to explore the local food and food culture as well as maybe a little bit more about my personal culinary background. I hope I can give you a good impression of what life is like on this side of the globe and am looking very forward to answering questions, engaging in spirited discussions and just can share a bit of my everyday life with you. Before starting with the regular revealing shots of my fridge’s content and some more information on myself, I’d like to start this blog and a slightly different place.
      For today's night, I ‘d like to report back from Chiba city, close to Tokyo, Japan. It’s my last day of a three day business trip and it’s a special day here in Japan: “Doyou no ushi no hi”. The “midsummer day of the ox”, which is actually one of the earlier (successful) attempts of a clever marketing stunt.  As sales of the traditional winter dish “Unagi” (grilled eel with sweet soy sauce) plummeted in summer, a clever merchant took advantage of the folk tale that food items starting with the letter “U” (like ume = sour plum and uri = gourd) dispel the summer heat, so he introduced “Unagi” as a new dish best enjoyed on this day. It was successful, and even in the supermarkets the sell Unagi-Don and related foods. Of course, I could not resist to take advantage and requested tonight dinner featuring eel. Thnaks to our kind production plant colleagues, I had what I was craving …
      (of course the rest of the food was not half as bad)

      Todays suggestion: Unagi (grilled eel) and the fitting Sake !
       

      For starters: Seeweed (upper left), raw baby mackerel with ginger (upper right) and sea snails. I did not care for the algae, but the little fishes were very tasty.
       

      Sahimi: Sea bream, Tuna and clam ...
       

      Tempura: Shrimp, Okra, Cod and Mioga (young pickled ginger sprouts).
       

      Shioyaki Ayu: salt-grilled river fish. I like this one a lot. I particularly enjoy the fixed shape mimicking the swimming motion. The best was the tail fin
       

      Wagyu: "nuff said ...
       

      Gourd. With a kind of jellied Oden stock. Nice !
       

      Unagi with Sansho (mountain pepper)
       

      So, so good. Rich and fat and sweet and smoky. I could eat a looooot of that ...
       

      Chawan Mushi:steamed egg custard. A bit overcooked. My Japanese hosts very surprised when I told them that I find it to be cooked at to high temperatures (causing the custard to loose it's silkiness), but they agreed.
       

      Part of the experience was of course the Sake. I enjoyed it a lot but whether this is the one to augment the taste of the Unagi I could not tell ...
       

      More Unagi (hey it's only twice per year) ...
       

      Miso soup with clams ...
       

      Tiramisu.
       

      Outside view of the restaurant. Very casual!
      On the way home I enjoyed a local IPA. Craft beer is a big thing in Japan at the moment (as probably anywhere else in the world), so at 29 oC in front of the train station I had this. Very fruity …

       
      When I came back to the hotel, the turn down service had made my bed and placed a little Origami crane on my pillow. You just have to love this attention to detail.

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×