• Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create an account.

  • product-image-quickten.png.a40203b506711f7664fc62024e54a584.pngDid you know that these all-volunteer forums are operated by the 501(c)3 not-for-profit Society for Culinary Arts & Letters? This holiday season, consider a tax-deductible Quick Ten Bucks to support the eG Forums and help us remain completely advertising-free. Thanks to all those who have donated so far!

Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0
jaybee

How did "cocktail" get its name?

2 posts in this topic

It is a strange name to call a combination of spirits and flavorings. I've worked as consultant to many spirits companies, and the term is used in the industry. but I think it is an anachronism. I never hear younger drinkers say "I'd like a cocktail" or "I'm invited to a cocktail party."

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Jaybee,

Your absolutely right the 25 to 30 set go to Martini parties! The word cocktail, which emerged at the end of the 18th century at first had a very narrow definition, a mixed alcoholic drink with Bitters, but by the end of the 19th century the word cocktail was applied to any mixed alcoholic drink. The same thing has happened to the word Martini, Martini has come to mean any cocktail served in that distinctive V shaped glass.

There are numerous stories about the origin of the word cocktail and most are just lore but one of the least repeated and the most likely sounding is the story of Antoine Peychaud. He is famous today as the maker of the Peychauds Bitters the brand that is used in the Sazerac cocktail. He came up with the recipe in his apothecary shop in New Orleans in 1793, and served it to friends dashed into small cups of cognac. The small cups he used were the two sided egg cups we use for soft eggs and in French they are apparently called coquetier and some people think they were copied by the fist makers of the two sided jigger for measuring cocktails. The word is similar to cocktail in pronunciation and was corrupted to cocktail….Sounds good to me!

Dale

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.