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Fat Guy

Things lots of people buy and I don't understand

155 posts in this topic

I love those dishwasher tablets - especially the ones that come in dissolvable wrappings. No mess or stickiness or measuring needed. We tend to stock up when they are on sale because they are more expensive than powder or liquid, but they really do give a nice clean.

I don't understand cheap supermarket sausages that come in two flavours: thick or thin (although they can be acceptable eaten outdoors and served nearly burnt with lots of onions in a bit of folded white bread). Actually, a lot of my things are meat-related: premade rissoles and burgers, pork 'spareribs, that are sliced like thick rashers (how do you cook them?), gravy beef (ditto), and marinated meats. The last always tastes so chemical to me.

As for cake mixes, I understand them, I just don't bother with them as they seem to be nearly as much work as a quick cake from scratch, and more expensive.

Also, we don't have it here, but Cool Whip. Never understood that stuff.

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Snadra - the cool whip is used for holiday desserts when all the ammo is hidden and the in-laws won't leave.


"I drink to make other people interesting".

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I thought Cool Whip was kosher?

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If something is available to me in powder form Ill buy that when given a choice.

People complain about the lack of clean fresh water on this planet and water shortages, but did you know that in areas

where bottling plants are, the levels of the lakes and streams drop?

Next time you go to the Costco and the 7-11 take note of the sheer amount of liquids that are on the shelves.

In each Costco the amount of liquids that are in containers on shelves alone could fill 5-6 swimming pools.

That is water removed from our lakes, streams and ecosystems...

so Id say

Unnecessary Liquid Detergents

Smart Waters et al

Spray Candy and its ilk marketed to kids


Wawa Sizzli FTW!

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I like liquid detergents and bottled water. Our well is really mineral heavy and it doesn't taste good to me, so I buy distilled for me. Everyone else and the dogs get tap water since they don't mind it.

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Unless there's something to it that distinguishes it from rice you've cooked yourself (is there? I'm happy to be wrong!), I don't understand why people buy those sachets of par-cooked rice. Rice isn't that complicated or time-consuming!

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Tomato plants in March? Them suckers are just gonna croak. You southern locale folks are exempt.

yes,last frost here is may 15,so you go to the plant place and get some that already have set fruit..

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Snadra - the cool whip is used for holiday desserts when all the ammo is hidden and the in-laws won't leave.

And suddenly I see a huge market opportunity! :laugh:

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Unless there's something to it that distinguishes it from rice you've cooked yourself (is there? I'm happy to be wrong!), I don't understand why people buy those sachets of par-cooked rice. Rice isn't that complicated or time-consuming!

I've had it and it's not so great. Not terrible, but *meh* compared to freshly cooked rice. Even living as a lazy and temporarily single person I don't find it's worth it. But last year I overheard a group of people talking about it and how fabulous it was. So convenient, saves time, perfectly cooked, etc. I suspect a lot of people find rice painful to cook, particularly if they are from a potatoes & noodles eating background and rice isn't a big part of their diet.

I too don't understand purchasing bottles and bottles of water when you have perfectly nice and safe tap water. For most (but not all) of us living in places where the water is less than stellar a Brita filter or similar is more cost- and waste-efficient. Just buy a re-usable bottle, for heaven's sake! Having said that I currently have several 10-litre containers of water in the house because we're still on a voluntary boil water alert after the recent floods, and the water in my rainwater tank was doubling as a bird bath until we put another cover over the filter.

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Unless there's something to it that distinguishes it from rice you've cooked yourself (is there? I'm happy to be wrong!), I don't understand why people buy those sachets of par-cooked rice. Rice isn't that complicated or time-consuming!

I've had it and it's not so great. Not terrible, but *meh* compared to freshly cooked rice. Even living as a lazy and temporarily single person I don't find it's worth it. But last year I overheard a group of people talking about it and how fabulous it was. So convenient, saves time, perfectly cooked, etc. I suspect a lot of people find rice painful to cook, particularly if they are from a potatoes & noodles eating background and rice isn't a big part of their diet.

Surely potatoes prepared in basically any form, aside from plain boiled or baked potatoes, are more labour intensive than rice--particularly if you throw down some pocket change in the direction of a small rice cooker.


Chris Taylor

Host, eG Forums - ctaylor@egstaff.org

 

I've never met an animal I didn't enjoy with salt and pepper.

Melbourne
Harare, Victoria Falls and some places in between

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Shirley Corriher says that self-rising flour is better because manufacturers have access to more and better leavening agents, and are more thoroughly mixed than we can achieve. Also, she points out that many recipes call for an incorrect amount of baking powder or soda. I can see that southerners who make biscuits or cornbread almost daily would find it a great convenience. I may give it a try for baked goods, but can't see using it as my go-to flour for everyday use. Who wants self-rising gravy?

I use those little packets of dishwashing detergent, mainly because the powders and liquids are very heavy for my arthritic hands, but also because those powders get up my nose. When I first started using the packets, they were much more reasonably priced than they are now.

My candidates for "don't understand" are mixes for things that only call for a few ingredients. Popover mix for example. Perhaps people buy these things because they have no idea how they are made.


Ruth Dondanville aka "ruthcooks"

“Are you making a statement, or are you making dinner?” Mario Batali

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Shirley Corriher says that self-rising flour is better because manufacturers have access to more and better leavening agents, and are more thoroughly mixed than we can achieve. Also, she points out that many recipes call for an incorrect amount of baking powder or soda. I can see that southerners who make biscuits or cornbread almost daily would find it a great convenience. I may give it a try for baked goods, but can't see using it as my go-to flour for everyday use. Who wants self-rising gravy?

So much of North America is far above sea level. Does self-rising flour fit in anywhere?


Darienne

learn, learn, learn...

Cheers & Chocolates

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It's sold here, too (at 3,000 meters above sea level) and I can only assume it's been adjusted for the altitude, although the same exact brand is also sold at sea level.


Elizabeth Campbell, baking 10,000 feet up at 1° South latitude.

My eG Food Blog (2011)My eG Foodblog (2012)

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Surely potatoes prepared in basically any form, aside from plain boiled or baked potatoes, are more labour intensive than rice--particularly if you throw down some pocket change in the direction of a small rice cooker.

I would agree, but I think it has more to do with the familiarity of potatoes and the perception of rice as a thing you eat with restaurant foods, rather than with dishes you make at home. Pasta is simple because you boil a lot of water, throw in the pasta and set the time. Potatoes are simple because you have always had them and know how to deal with them and as a rule they are all about boiling in water in a pot. Rice seems harder because you need to measure it and the cooking water accurately and cook it at the correct temperature so as not to burn it (excluding a rice cooker). Add that to a cooking style that doesn't really complement rice-based dishes and you can see how rice gives an impression of being troublesome.

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Cheez Whiz and Velveeta are another pair of things that people buy and I don't understand. Especially when there's real cheese available.

I see what you're saying, but I can't make mac and cheese without using Velveeta. It makes it SO creamy and good.

And, I do love some Cheez Whiz on a philly steak sandwich.....

I'm from Kansas. Don't mock me.

:raz:

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My candidates for "don't understand" are mixes for things that only call for a few ingredients. Popover mix for example. Perhaps people buy these things because they have no idea how they are made.

I made homemade butter the other day and people were shocked. "Howd you make butter?" They literally had no clue.


Wawa Sizzli FTW!

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My candidates for "don't understand" are mixes for things that only call for a few ingredients. Popover mix for example. Perhaps people buy these things because they have no idea how they are made.

I made homemade butter the other day and people were shocked. "Howd you make butter?" They literally had no clue.

Seriously???

What is the world coming to. We need to send them a set of Little House on the Prairie books.

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Water: I filter my own at home.

Bisquick: I can make better tasting food from better ingredients more cheaply.

Salad Dressings: Again, I can make better and cheaper dressings from scratch.

Powdered Sauce Packets: Really? You need a reason? None of these sauces is that hard to make for real.

Many Canned Vegetables: Fresh or frozen vegetables generally taste better. (I do like canned tomatoes.)

Canned Soup: Once again, scratch tastes better and is cheaper.

Dinner Assembly Kits: I can pull all of the dry parts out of my pantry more cheaply, and a fresh sauce is better.

Supermarket Baked Goods: They're frightfully bad.

Baking Mixes: Saving a tiny amount of time isn't worth sacrificing flavor.

Spice Blends: I can mix my own, thank you.

Frozen Toast

Frozen PB&J

Frozen Garlic Bread

Frozen Waffles & Pancakes

Cocktail Mixers

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Cheez Whiz and Velveeta are another pair of things that people buy and I don't understand. Especially when there's real cheese available.

I see what you're saying, but I can't make mac and cheese without using Velveeta. It makes it SO creamy and good.

And, I do love some Cheez Whiz on a philly steak sandwich.....

I'm from Kansas. Don't mock me.

:raz:

Ditto. Except I'm from Virginia :laugh: . Actually I have NO business being appalled at what other people buy. I remember being stunned that my nieces had never seen anyone make pancakes from scratch, but I'm 'guilty' of many, many of the things mentioned above. I use those microwave rice packets a lot. I like them and they take 90 seconds. I sometimes have self-rising flour on hand. Most southern cooks I know do too. I cook cakes from scratch most of the time, but I always have mixes on hand just in case, plus I like the texture - wish my homemade cakes could have that texture, in fact. And on and on and on. I know that there are a LOT of folks, especially here at eG that don't ever take a shortcut or eat food that isn't completely from scratch. But that's not me. Never will be. It's not something that bothers me too much. I get a lot of pleasure seeing those folks cook and seeing the amazing things that they create. But is that going to lead me in the same direction? Probably not.

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Well said Kim.

We make queso dip with Velveeta and salsa or Rotel tomatoes during football season. I buy frozen vegetables quite a bit since the selection here is not that great and there are no farmer's markets. Of course, I don't do this when my own garden is producing, but last year all my plants just cooked in the sun despite watering and feeding.

Your nieces sound like my SIL who had never had real mashed potatoes until she moved away from home. Her mother is a fan of instant foods, and it frosts my brother's butt to have to eat at her house when they visit.

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I remember - not fondly - tinned (canned) peas. Unfortunate off-green colour, squishy texture, taste like .. well, I could say but it would be an insult to makers of good Pinot Noir. I could never understand why anybody would buy them rather than frozen or even dried.

'Gravy' ingredients like Bisto result in something which looks a bit like gravy but doesn't taste remotely like juice-from-meat. Much better to use ... well, juice from meat.

And yes, water. The stuff from the tap is just fine for me.


Leslie Craven, aka "lesliec"
Host, eG Forumslcraven@egstaff.org

After a good dinner one can forgive anybody, even one's own relatives ~ Oscar Wilde

My eG Foodblog

eGullet Ethics Code signatory

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Velveeta/Whiz is modernist cuisine. Cheese processed to make it behave.

Critical for cheesesteaks (Whiz) and vital for queso (velveeta) for teenager's parties.

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"Those little plastic packets you put in the dishwasher instead of liquid or powder detergent."

hey! I love those things!

they actually where highly rated by consumer reports (at least the ones i buy).

the convenience factor is massive.

when i use liquid goo, inevitably, the little detergent door gets gunked up and stuck, and i have to spend time cleaning it up.

but hey, i used liquid for years before i switched.

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I remember - not fondly - tinned (canned) peas. Unfortunate off-green colour, squishy texture, taste like .. well, I could say but it would be an insult to makers of good Pinot Noir. I could never understand why anybody would buy them rather than frozen or even dried.

A tin of "Processed peas" is one of my secret shames. I love them, even though I know I shouldn't.

I can't understand why people buy pre-sliced or pre-grated cheese. To me it always tastes like plastic.

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