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munchymom

eG Foodblog: munchymom (2012) - The Week I Ate Whatever I Wanted

105 posts in this topic

Lunch:

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Chicken and tomato with mayo and mustard on a wheat roll. Taco flavored Doritos on the side.

The "complimentary deluxe contintental breakfast" offered by the hotel was unexceptional from a culinary standpoint, but it did allow me to appropriate a few paper plates, napkins, and a plastic fork and knife so I don't have to eat off of wrappers anymore.


"There is nothing like a good tomato sandwich now and then."

-Harriet M. Welsch

Visit my food blog! http://goodformeblog.blogspot.com/

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Breakfast time:

DSCN0125.jpg

Brie on crackers, strawberries, and Champagne.

These strawberries have not been hulled properly.

:smile:

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Breakfast time:

DSCN0125.jpg

Brie on crackers, strawberries, and Champagne.

These strawberries have not been hulled properly.

:smile:

Ok, now THAT was funny :biggrin: :biggrin: :biggrin:

Good to see you loosen up a bit ;)

Munchy mom, I love your breakfast. I wish I could have the same thing every day.

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Tonight's dinner was pretty much the same as last night's dinner, so I'm not putting in another picture. I'm going to get an early start toward home tomorrow. I'll make a few stops for food along the way. So you should expect to see me sometime in the mid-afternoon. Off to enjoy my last evening on the beach.


"There is nothing like a good tomato sandwich now and then."

-Harriet M. Welsch

Visit my food blog! http://goodformeblog.blogspot.com/

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I'm back home, safe and sound. I ended up driving straight through again. So after ascertaining that my house was still standing, I headed over to one of my favorite neighborhood restaurants, Ilios Noche, for an afternoon snack:

DSCN0131.jpg

Fried eggplant and zucchini chips, with tzatziki dipping sauce, and a glass of Chardonnay.


"There is nothing like a good tomato sandwich now and then."

-Harriet M. Welsch

Visit my food blog! http://goodformeblog.blogspot.com/

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I'm back home, safe and sound. I ended up driving straight through again. So after ascertaining that my house was still standing, I headed over to one of my favorite neighborhood restaurants, Ilios Noche, for an afternoon snack:

DSCN0131.jpg

Fried eggplant and zucchini chips, with tzatziki dipping sauce, and a glass of Chardonnay.

You're killing me. That looks divine.

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Are the eggplant pieces also chips?


Darienne

learn, learn, learn...

Cheers & Chocolates

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Yes. I meant (fried(eggplant and zucchini chips)) not (fried eggplant) and (zucchini chips). It's all chips. Not as crunchy as potato chips, more sort of like very thinly sliced tempura.


"There is nothing like a good tomato sandwich now and then."

-Harriet M. Welsch

Visit my food blog! http://goodformeblog.blogspot.com/

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Christa – I am just loving this blog, just like I knew that I would. A couple of things:

I love your ‘theme’! I am a big ‘me time’ person and have threatened to run away from home in order to get it!

I’ve printed out your strawberry cocktail recipe – I want that as soon as the strawberries are good.

I love your plates. Are those really hieroglyphics?

In my recipe file cabinet, I have a print out, probably 15 years old, with a description of Yquem. I’ve never tasted it, but I've also never been able to toss the paper – I’m haunted by this wine. I jumped and smiled when I recognized the bottle!

Taco flavored Doritos are manna.

This is so good.

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Kim:

I always thought the pictures on the plates were supposed to represent Native American petroglyphs, but I really haven't a clue.

Re: Yquem: I've only had it once before, about twelve years ago (that time it was a 1990), and it was amazing, but you can get really stunning Sauternes for a fraction of the price. I've had very high-scoring ones from $30 - $50 for a (375 ml) bottle. It's worth a look if you like dessert wine.


"There is nothing like a good tomato sandwich now and then."

-Harriet M. Welsch

Visit my food blog! http://goodformeblog.blogspot.com/

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I remember my parents going to Buffalo and buying a couple of bottles of Chateau d'Yquem when I was a child. I seem the think the price was rather outrageous at around $25. I've forgotten what the occasions were for their opening - but I recall there was a wheel of old cheddar from a favourite cheese factory on the Bay of Quinte at one of those openings.

It was one of the best things I'd tasted - the old cheese was the perfect foil for the sweetness of the wine - and I know I wanted to be sure I was around for the opening of the second bottle!

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I LOVE Bubbies kraut... used to be able to get it at my Publix, but they don't carry it anymore. :sad:

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An aptly named late-night snack:

DSCN0141.jpg

See you in the morning.


"There is nothing like a good tomato sandwich now and then."

-Harriet M. Welsch

Visit my food blog! http://goodformeblog.blogspot.com/

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Kim:

I always thought the pictures on the plates were supposed to represent Native American petroglyphs, but I really haven't a clue.

Re: Yquem: I've only had it once before, about twelve years ago (that time it was a 1990), and it was amazing, but you can get really stunning Sauternes for a fraction of the price. I've had very high-scoring ones from $30 - $50 for a (375 ml) bottle. It's worth a look if you like dessert wine.

You are probably right - I'm an Egyptophile (and I make up my own words!), so I just assumed hieroglyphics.

I will search out a reasonably priced Sauternes - I've had other people suggest that to me.

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Kim:

I always thought the pictures on the plates were supposed to represent Native American petroglyphs, but I really haven't a clue.

I was thinking Minoan because of the bull but the falcon looks Egyptian so I'm guessing Egyptian or that someone just thought they looked nice (and they do).

The veggie chips look great, too!


It's almost never bad to feed someone.

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I slept late and skipped breakfast.

For lunch, I was in the mood for Mexican food, so I went to... a shopping mall?

Was I perhaps in search of Taco Bell?

Nope.

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Plaza Fiesta is a mall just over the NC/SC border which caters to the large and growing Latino population in the area.

I had lunch here:

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Two tacos (the front one is carnitas, the back al pastor), rice and beans. The tacos were both delicious, well flavored meat and slightly toasted soft corn tortillas. Those beans were not the flavorless pile of goo that one often finds at Mexican restaurants, but had a rich smoky flavor. There's some pork fat in there for sure.


"There is nothing like a good tomato sandwich now and then."

-Harriet M. Welsch

Visit my food blog! http://goodformeblog.blogspot.com/

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On the way home from lunch I stopped at a farm stand for these:

DSCN0147.jpg

The strawberries, not the cat of course. The cat is my constant companion Purrl, who is inexplicably attracted to any vegetable matter I bring in the house. I put those berries in the fridge right away before she could get a bite.


"There is nothing like a good tomato sandwich now and then."

-Harriet M. Welsch

Visit my food blog! http://goodformeblog.blogspot.com/

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That toasted sandwich. Can you help for those of us unfamiliar with American brands. I can spot sauerkraut, and Swiss cheese (is that sort of generic Emmental style?). But what's in the front packet? And the bottle?

Ta

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corned beef or pastrami, and thousand island salad dressing.


"You dont know everything in the world! You just know how to read!" -an ah-hah! moment for 6-yr old Miss O.

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That toasted sandwich. Can you help for those of us unfamiliar with American brands. I can spot sauerkraut, and Swiss cheese (is that sort of generic Emmental style?). But what's in the front packet? And the bottle?

Ta

I'm not Munchy Mom, but the bottle is Thousand Island dressing, and the front packet is a good brand of corned beef, from the deli counter (I THINK it says Boar's Head...)The completed ensemble (sp?) is called a Ruben sandwich, which must be grilled, NOT served just on toasted rye, to my taste! (YMMV) :laugh:

And, by the way, my sainted grandmother had a marmalade cat who would kill for asparagus 'butts'. (That's the stringy part that should snap off IF you flex the stem; Nana never did, so Ike could have his treat...)


"Commit random acts of senseless kindness"

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Yes, thanks to those who stepped in to answer, that sandwich is a Reuben. Corned beef, Thousand Island dressing (a sweet sauce that is basically ketchup and mayonnaise with a little sweet pickle mixed in), Sauerkraut, and Swiss cheese (this is actually not imported, but a domestically produced mild cheese that is sort of reminiscent of Emmenthal), grilled on rye bread.

Re: the cat: yes, she is a tortoiseshell. I don't know if she'd eat fruit, but she's always very taken with it. I have a strict policy of never letting her have human food, because my parents had a cat and dog when I was growing up who were given snacks from the table, and both pets were disgustingly impossible to live with. I will not have a pet who begs for my food.


"There is nothing like a good tomato sandwich now and then."

-Harriet M. Welsch

Visit my food blog! http://goodformeblog.blogspot.com/

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As the old saying goes, life is uncertain, so today we'll start dessert first.

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To everything...

(churn, churn, churn)

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There is a season...

(churn, churn, churn)

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And a time for every ice cream that tastes like heaven.

DSCN0158.jpg


"There is nothing like a good tomato sandwich now and then."

-Harriet M. Welsch

Visit my food blog! http://goodformeblog.blogspot.com/

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Dinnertime:

DSCN0159.jpg

This right here's the real deal, y'all:

DSCN0161.jpg

Ribs, pulled pork, hush puppies, french fries, and there are baked beans hiding behind the ribs. The white tub is cole slaw, the red ones are spicy vinegar sauce.

The traditional drink with barbecue is sweet iced tea, however since I got my meal to go, I can break with tradition:

DSCN0164.jpg

Dry apple cider is a great companion to smoked pork.


"There is nothing like a good tomato sandwich now and then."

-Harriet M. Welsch

Visit my food blog! http://goodformeblog.blogspot.com/

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I should say that those ribs are not traditional NC or SC barbecue, as far as I know, but they are seriously one of the best things ever. They smoke the ribs until they're done, and then when you order them they put them on the grill and baste them with a sweet sauce, so they get all caramelized. The inside is tender and smoky, and the outside is sweet and a little burnt and chewy, like pork candy.


"There is nothing like a good tomato sandwich now and then."

-Harriet M. Welsch

Visit my food blog! http://goodformeblog.blogspot.com/

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