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Shel_B

Matzoh Brei:

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It's matzoh season, and time for a few breakfasts of matzoh brie. I've been making it for years, and have a few recipes in my files, but this year I'd like to try something different. So, how do you make yours? Any preference for a brand or type of matzoh? Or for other ingredients? Thanks!


 ... Shel


 

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I used to take these home to my father in CA from N.E.:

http://www.vtcheese.com/members/blythedale/blythedale.htm

The Brie and Camembert are exceptional, especially if you pick the oldest 'by date' in the dairy case and leave them to ripen on the counter 'to suit your needs."

Maybe they now ship to CA?

other than that i get the Trader's camembert that 'bulges' the most with the highest fat content and do the same.

Of course, that would depend on how 'ripe' you might like either of these cheeses.

Unfortunately Ive not had the pleasure to try both the VT cheeses 'equally ripe' at the same time.

Id love to see a pic of your results!


Edited by heidih Fix link (log)

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Matzoh Brie is fried matzoh.


Edited by Shel_B (log)

 ... Shel


 

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sorry. I thought there might be a dairy issue. shows how much i know.

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More common spelling (and the one that helps you pronounce it) is Matzoh Brei. As in "bry."

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I make my matzoh brei savory, and how my dad makes it:

Ratio of 3 matzoh per egg, enough total volume to fill the pan I'm using.

  1. Heat a decent amount of water with some salt added.
  2. Brown sliced onions and mushrooms with some salt; set aside.
  3. Break up matzoh in to somewhat large pieces (around 1.5-2 inches, I'd guess) and put in large heat-resistant bowl.
  4. Pour hot water over matzoh, cover with a plate for 20-30 seconds. Drain.
  5. Carefully mix in mushrooms and onions mixture plus beaten eggs seasoned with salt and pepper so as not to break up the wet matzoh. Add additional salt and pepper, to taste.
  6. Pour whole mixture into a heated, oiled pan.
  7. Flip as if a frittata (with a plate's assistance.
  8. Cut into wedges and serve.

I figured I'd specify because people make theirs differently. My husband grew up with the slightly-dampened-and-scrambled-with-eggs variety. (And it was served with balsamic vinegar!)

Actually, when we were a little older my dad also made a sweetened version with apples which he baked in a cake pan.

My absolute favorite store brand matzoh is Rakusen's, a British brand. Having gotten used to this one I have always hated eating all the other ones plain. I loved enough that I posted a few years ago asking if anyone knew where to find it locally. I gave up the chase in Manhattan, though, and just ask my parents to buy me some on Long Island come Passover.


"I know it's the bugs, that's what cheese is. Gone off milk with bugs and mould - that's why it tastes so good. Cows and bugs together have a good deal going down."

- Gareth Blackstock (Lenny Henry), Chef!

eG Ethics Signatory

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I use the thin whole wheat matza. 2 sheets. I pour boiling water over it, let it sit for a minute or two. Pour out. I whisk 1 egg, and 1 white, splash of milk. Pour over. Fry in a bit of butter. I scramble it around while frying. I eat with a bit of real maple syrup cut with sugar free syrup or like my mom served us, with sugar and jelly( or jam).

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I make my matzoh brei savory, and how my dad makes it:

Ratio of 3 matzoh per egg, enough total volume to fill the pan I'm using.

  1. Heat a decent amount of water with some salt added.
  2. Brown sliced onions and mushrooms with some salt; set aside.
  3. Break up matzoh in to somewhat large pieces (around 1.5-2 inches, I'd guess) and put in large heat-resistant bowl.
  4. Pour hot water over matzoh, cover with a plate for 20-30 seconds. Drain.
  5. Carefully mix in mushrooms and onions mixture plus beaten eggs seasoned with salt and pepper so as not to break up the wet matzoh. Add additional salt and pepper, to taste.
  6. Pour whole mixture into a heated, oiled pan.
  7. Flip as if a frittata (with a plate's assistance.
  8. Cut into wedges and serve.

Im making them like this similar, just i put mushrooms without salt because i prefer non-salty ones :)


"The way you cut your meat reflects the way you live."

Franchise Takeaway

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