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Big Joe the Pro

Baking Bread in China, A Glossary

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Hey, I just stumbled upon what looks like an excellent glossary of types of flour available in China in English, Chinese and pin yin. The link is here, hope it helps!

Also, a little off-topic but; I just got an email from Pantry Magic Corporate saying that they've been trying to get the new Beijing store (near Worker's Stadium) to close down since mid-February for 'serious non-compliance'. What's up with that?

P.S. I'm not connected to that bread web site or Pantry Magic in any way, for you jaded, snarky-types lurking out there!

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flour available in China

"Baking Bread in Beijing" would be a much better title. Beijing is a tiny part of China. Most of these flours are unknown in most of China.

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