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Food Network's 100 Greatest Cooking Tips: Not Too Shabby!


Chris Amirault
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I read the list imagining what @angryBobbyFlay's twitter feed would do with/to these tips. :laugh:

If you've never seen it, this post will make no sense at all.

Lol, I think they would all involve telling his significant other A) where they can put that tip, or B) how death is preferred over it.

Jerry

Kansas City, Mo.

Unsaved Loved Ones

My eG Food Blog- 2011

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The ones I have read, about 20, made not much sense.

27. Take the time to actually read recipes through before you begin.

There are some many lousy recipes out there, read the reviews first not the recipes.

This is, to my mind, the best single piece of advice in the bunch. While it's true that there are many poorly written recipes out there, that's exactly why it's important to read through the recipe before you start. That way you'll know if there are any potential problems or screwy instructions. It's not about deciding if the recipe is good; it's about figuring out everything you need to do before you start.

That being said, there are several tips that are either incorrect or incomplete, which could prove problematic for beginning cooks. For instance:

19. For best results when you're baking, leave butter and eggs at room temperature overnight. (Ina Garten) -- True for some baked goods, but certainly not for pastry dough. In that case, you want the butter as cold as possible.

64. When you grill, pull your steaks out of the refrigerator one hour ahead of time so they can come to room temperature. (Geoffrey Zakarian) -- If you have a really thin steak, an hour might be enough, but for a thick steak, it'll take several hours.

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The ones I have read, about 20, made not much sense.

27. Take the time to actually read recipes through before you begin.

There are some many lousy recipes out there, read the reviews first not the recipes.

This is, to my mind, the best single piece of advice in the bunch. While it's true that there are many poorly written recipes out there, that's exactly why it's important to read through the recipe before you start. That way you'll know if there are any potential problems or screwy instructions. It's not about deciding if the recipe is good; it's about figuring out everything you need to do before you start.

Would that I could. I try, but the old brain has apparently slipped a few cogs in the last few years.

I do perform the second best. When I fail to add the vanilla, or cream the sugar when it is supposed to be mixed with the flour or can't recall what pan size I used the last time or that the baking time doesn't work for my oven or me...I note my errant ways clearly and in large caps, often starred*, so that next time around, my eye will be drawn to my earlier mistakes.

Second time around, I do get it right. :smile:

Darienne

 

learn, learn, learn...

 

Life in the Meadows and Rivers

Cheers & Chocolates

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