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Can someone identify this vegetable?


ermintrude
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Pulled all the bits out of the Puntarelle and sliced them up and refreshed in some iced water.

Boiled some Anya potatoes and sliced

Segmented an orange

Made a dressing:-

1 Tin Anchovies

3 Cloves Garlic

2 Heaped tsp capers

Juice and zest of a lemon

1 tsp of dijon mustard

Smashed it all to a pulp in a pestle and mortar added several glugs of EVO

Mixed everything together and added some parmigiano reggiano shavings.

IMG_0502 copy.jpg

Time flies like an arrow, fruit flies like a banana.

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Made a dressing:-

1 Tin Anchovies

3 Cloves Garlic

2 Heaped tsp capers

Juice and zest of a lemon

1 tsp of dijon mustard

Smashed it all to a pulp in a pestle and mortar added several glugs of EVO

Mixed everything together and added some parmigiano reggiano shavings.

Did this dressing turn out to be merely good...

Or as fabulous as it sounds?

I don't understand why rappers have to hunch over while they stomp around the stage hollering.  It hurts my back to watch them. On the other hand, I've been thinking that perhaps I should start a rap group here at the Old Folks' Home.  Most of us already walk like that.

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Puntarelle are a typical roman salad here. I make it often, I peel the single tips and in Rome they sell a special tool to slice them, which I don't have, so I julienne and dump into iced water to curle. Then the classic dressing is anchovies mashed, chopped garlic, little white wine vinegar and good evoo. Dress them at list one hour in advance.

But you can cook them too, braising starting again with garlic and anchovies. Or I often use them mixed with other bitter greens.

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  • 2 months later...

IMG_0205.jpg

Picked these up at an asian market - strong allium smell. Not quite sure what they are or what I should do with them. They are a multibulbed base with two or more shoots coming out of each long thin bulb. The bulbs have layers of onion skin holding them together.

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They look like baby shallots. The local Philippine market carries them. I have planted them (very shallow) and as they mature the bulbs break apart and spread out. When mature they are the reddish shallots.

"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett

 

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Excellent - wondered if that was the case. Seemed to be the only allium that had more than one sprout per bulb - but couldn't find any similar pictures. Now what to do with them?

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Excellent - wondered if that was the case. Seemed to be the only allium that had more than one sprout per bulb - but couldn't find any similar pictures. Now what to do with them?

Treat them just as you would scallions as in a stir fry dish. Just nip off the root end and trip the tops somewhat and cut them into thirds and split the root end. They become quite tender when cooked briefly. You can also steam them briefly, chill and include in salads.

They pair beautifully with ginger.

You can chop them fine and prepare a baked omelet - or pancakes similar to egg foo young.

"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett

 

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IMG_0205.jpg

Picked these up at an asian market - strong allium smell. Not quite sure what they are or what I should do with them. They are a multibulbed base with two or more shoots coming out of each long thin bulb. The bulbs have layers of onion skin holding them together.

I love that informative label: "Vegetable" :laugh:

Yesterday, I noted that labels on the packages of chicken feet read, "Chicken Paws" :laugh:

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The shallot looking things are rakkyo. They are great pickled in amazu as sweet and sour pickles. Traditional accompianment to japanese curry.

John,

Do you have a recipe?

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