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tsg20

Guanciale in London

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Does anyone know of anywhere in (preferably central) London selling decent guanciale?

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Thanks! Minimum of 40 quid order plus delivery on top, though...

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Haven't bought it myself but a (very) knowledgeable friend tells me that you can find it in all Italian delies that sell the products of C. Carnevale, as well as The Ginger Pig (various outlets in LOndon (Shepherds Bush, Hackney, Marylebone, Borough Market e Waterloo).

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I'd never seen it in the Ginger Pig, and just phoned to be told they didn't even know what it was (slightly surprisingly, but...).

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I can't get onto Natoora website at the moment but I believe their Guanciale is from Antica Macelleria Falorni, if so it is really excellent. The lardo from that butchers is also excellent. If you ever find yourself in Greve it is a must visit butchers.

http://www.falorni.it/IT/it_home.php

Have you ever tried making it yourself? It's about the easiest piece of charcuterie to prepare that you'll come across, I've got one curing at the moment :smile:

Guanciale.JPG


"Why would we want Children? What do they know about food?"

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I'd never seen it in the Ginger Pig, and just phoned to be told they didn't even know what it was (slightly surprisingly, but...).

Ask for 'Smoked Chicks' (or something that sounds like that...) that is the guanciale they produce (also non-smoked)

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I've only ever seen fresh or smoked cheeks in the GP, never a straight cure?


"Why would we want Children? What do they know about food?"

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I've only ever seen fresh or smoked cheeks in the GP, never a straight cure?

At this stage I'm getting curious, next time I'm London I'll go check myself and see what exactly they have (my friend is in the restaurant business, has a private club, so normally I'd trust him, on the other if you two guys say you've never seen guanciale in GP I wonder...maybe it's just some branch?)

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Have you ever tried making it yourself? It's about the easiest piece of charcuterie to prepare that you'll come across, I've got one curing at the moment :smile:

That sounds like a great idea, except I'm not sure our tiny flat has anywhere at the right temperature for the part where you have to hang it up for a month or two (I'm imagining a cellar is what you want here?).

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Mine is hanging indoors, fairly cool but not especially so. I can't really do much during the height of summer but this time of year is OK, have you got a small utility room or anything? Worth a go, especially when cheeks are so cheap (£2 each at GP).


"Why would we want Children? What do they know about food?"

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I do have a small closet, but I also have a vegetarian wife. We'll see! I'll probably just give it a go by grabbing some cheeks next time I'm in GP.

In any case I bit the bullet and ordered from Natoora, and I have to say I'm pretty impressed - found 10 quid off at quidco and free delivery, and tonight I got 1.5kg of guanciale and some other stuff. Made a great carbonara just now (I'd forgotten how much of a difference it makes versus bacon), and the lardo is fantastic, too.

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Was going to make a separate thread about this, but hijacked this one! Ocado now appear to be stocking some of the Natoora line. Great for me as I like the Ocado service, the website is the best of the online groceries IMHO and the delivery times and rates are good. could never really justify a full Natoora order for a few speciality items, plus wasn't sure if I'd be in for the delivery.

Got a few items delivered this morning, by the world's friendliest delivery man! Got some pancetta, artichokes and some pink fir apples. Was looking at the Guanciale, but it implied it was quite thinly sliced (but not clear). I'll try some next time. Was upset that they had ran out of N'duja though - fancied trying it.Not on commission from Ocado, or Natoora by the way - just a fan of the service!

Can see my already high Ocado bills going through the roof though....


I love animals.

They are delicious.

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You will have to excuse the blatant plug but my business partners have just picked up 3stars at this year’s Great Taste Awards for a Guanciale that I designed the cure for. Hopefully it may be available to a larger pork loving audience shortly..

http://www.meattradenewsdaily.co.uk/news/080812/uk___uk_gold_record_set_by_hannan_in_great_taste_awards.aspx

http://meat.win01.servers.tc/know-your-meat/butchers-block/


Its only food...!

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