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Chocolates with that backroom finish


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5 hours ago, MoonChild said:

...

That's kinda interesting.  I can raise the temp in my chocolate room, but trying to get the humidity low might be difficult here in Hawaii.  I'm curious though........I've always been under the assumption that a colder room is better for working with chocolate.  Could you please elaborate on how a cold room can negatively affect my results?  Thank you! 


I prefer colder, about 65F/18C

 

if you can’t control humidity, stay on the cooler side, 22C/72F with 65% humidity is approaching nightmare territory 

 

 

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@MoonChild....colder is not automatically better...there is a point of diminishing returns which happens for me at about below 20 °C

Your mold is colder and your chocolate cools down much quicker and gets harder to work with ...cold mold, cold cocoa butter layer and cooler chocolate means you have less time in the perfect temperature zone...your first couple of molds may come out fine but then as everything cools down you start to have problems.

And any humidity above 50 % really screws with my results (not sure the scientific reason though).

I have a dehumidifier in my chocolate room running 24/7 and pull 2-3 liters of water out of it every day...then again I live in the tropics.

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14 hours ago, pastrygirl said:


I prefer colder, about 65F/18C

 

if you can’t control humidity, stay on the cooler side, 22C/72F with 65% humidity is approaching nightmare territory 

 

 

 

53 minutes ago, Avachocolate said:

@MoonChild....colder is not automatically better...there is a point of diminishing returns which happens for me at about below 20 °C

Your mold is colder and your chocolate cools down much quicker and gets harder to work with ...cold mold, cold cocoa butter layer and cooler chocolate means you have less time in the perfect temperature zone...your first couple of molds may come out fine but then as everything cools down you start to have problems.

And any humidity above 50 % really screws with my results (not sure the scientific reason though).

I have a dehumidifier in my chocolate room running 24/7 and pull 2-3 liters of water out of it every day...then again I live in the tropics.

 

Thank you both for your insight.  I kind of get the feeling that everyone's situation solutions are different.......even more after exploring other chocolate threads on these forums.  Supposedly, my work has two dehumidifiers for my chocolate room installed in my ceiling.  No matter what my work does, they can't get the humidity below 65%.  I think I can control my room temperature though......I'll have to look into it.  I'll probably test making bon bons in my room at both temps.  I feel like it's still a hit or miss for me and I can't get things to come out consistently way or the other.  One moment, I feel like I got it and things are looking good and then the next, my cocoa butter sticks.  I'm left asking myself...."Wait.....I did everything the same. Why did it work the last time, but not this time?"  Everyone here seems to have a lot of experience here.  Do you still have batches that are a complete fail or are you at a point now where everything cracks out clean every time?

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4 hours ago, MoonChild said:

I kind of get the feeling that everyone's situation solutions are different...


That's the number one thing I've learned about chocolate work. There are zero rules written in stone. Each and every thing that one person says you must do will be countered by someone who will say "yeah, not so much". The upside of that is, chocolate doesn't seem to be nearly as finicky and unforgiving as I once believed. It's really just about tweaking the basic guidelines until they work for you. One thing that makes sorting advice easier is to automatically write off any advice that begins with "you must always do it exactly like this". :D

  • Like 6

It's kinda like wrestling a gorilla... you don't stop when you're tired, you stop when the gorilla is tired.

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  • 3 weeks later...

UPDATE:  Thanks to everyones' helpful advice and tips, I've been able to increase my success rate for most of my molded bon bons.  I still have a long way to go, but I'm grateful that I've been pointed in the right direction.  For the most part, I was shelling most of my bon bons at too low a temperature as assumed.....I just didn't realize I could go warmer for my chocolate out of fear that I would take it out of temper.  I really wish we could get an eztemper for my shop.  I'd really like to give it a try and see what a difference it'll make, but it'll take a bit of convincing before I can get my chef to purchase one. 

I hope my questions don't come off as annoying or irritating.....so far this forum has been a saving grace for me because not many places do chocolate work where I live so my resources for knowledge and experience are very limited. Unfortunately, , I am still running into some issues with a couple of bon bons and I've run out of ideas as to how I can fix my problem.  Once again, I hope I can get everyone's help with troubleshooting this. These are my knowns:

 

-Room Temp: 18 degrees Celsius (I found out that I cannot change this)

-Humidity: 57-60% at the lowest

-Thermometer was properly calibrated prior

-Cocoa butter is sprayed onto the molds at 27-30 degrees Celsius

-The first picture (gold and brown bon bon) was shelled with tempered Valrhona dark chocolate at 33.5-34 degrees Celsius

-The second picture (green and yellow bon bon) was shelled with tempered Valrhona Ivoire white chocolate at 31-31.5 degrees Celsius

-I filled the molds a couple of hours after the shells set.

-Ganache fillings were 30 degrees Celsius or lower before filling and left to crystalize overnight.   

 

My issue, as you can see in the picture, is that I still have a little cocoa butter sticking to the mold in spots and don't get a 100% clean release.  I feel like I've gone as warm as I can go with the respective chocolates before I lose temper, so I'm not sure what else I can do.  Has anyone else run into this issue or know what else I could try to fix this?  Any help is appreciated.  Thank you so much!

thumbnail_IMG_7237.thumb.jpg.2183dec526b8a7ab1c84592093ad63c9.jpgthumbnail_Resized_20191223_172025.thumb.jpg.89f5b09b64db9a18263671984874a9ea.jpg

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You are working with temperatures that are a bit too high. Since you are working manually you can't be sure that ALL the chocolate is at the temperature you are measuring. Most probably some parts in the bowl will be a bit hotter and some parts a bit colder. The hotter parts are melting the thin layer of cocoa butter on the molds, sending it out of temper.

Try lowering of 1 degree Celsius your working temperatures for chocolate.

 

 

 

Teo

 

Teo

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  • 11 months later...

I need help! This is a problem that has happened to me too many times. At first I thought the cracks happened because the chocolate I use to cap was not warm enough or I didn’t warm the surface enough before capping but now I think it may be because my shells are too thin. Do you think that‘s the problem??  I can not have that happen to me again! 😥

 

I let the ganache crystallize overnight and I cap with acetate sheets.

A3F72D4A-7F7B-40B9-915A-C6ED1184CD5C.jpeg

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10 minutes ago, Muscadelle said:

I need help! This is a problem that has happened to me too many times. At first I thought the cracks happened because the chocolate I use to cap was not warm enough or I didn’t warm the surface enough before capping but now I think it may be because my shells are too thin. Do you think that‘s the problem??  I can not have that happen to me again! 😥

 

I let the ganache crystallize overnight and I cap with acetate sheets.

A3F72D4A-7F7B-40B9-915A-C6ED1184CD5C.jpeg

What's the wedge we are seeing?

 

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The crack appears to be happening where the interface between the two chocolates is happening. Two questions - are you heating your shells before you back them off. Does the same thing occur when you back off in milk chocolate?

 

 

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28 minutes ago, Kerry Beal said:

The crack appears to be happening where the interface between the two chocolates is happening. Two questions - are you heating your shells before you back them off. Does the same thing occur when you back off in milk chocolate?

 

 

Thank you for responding Kerry!

 

Yes I do heat them before capping. I almost never use the same type of chocolate for shelling and capping so I'm not sure...but most of them turns out just fine. 

 

I feel like the shell is not that thin either... could it be a filling that is too soft even when fully crystallized?

 

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