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Mette

Chocolates with that backroom finish

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These ones did not even make it to the backroom - firmly stuck blackcurrant paté de fruit

(hint - make sure you use silicone paper to pour the PdF)

PDF.jpg

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These ones did not even make it to the backroom - firmly stuck blackcurrant paté de fruit

(hint - make sure you use silicone paper to pour the PdF)

attachicon.gifPDF.jpg

Oops. Is that madpapir?

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These ones did not even make it to the backroom - firmly stuck blackcurrant paté de fruit

(hint - make sure you use silicone paper to pour the PdF)

attachicon.gifPDF.jpg

Oops. Is that madpapir?

Oops, indeed.....Madpapir (greaseproof sandwich wrapping paper) is NOT the same as silicone paper....

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I find PDF peels right off acetate with no problems.

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Here's my latest back room finish lovely delight. I was experimenting on whether I could have my transfer sheet on the sheet pan and just slide the chocolate onto the transfer sheet after dipping to save time from cutting each square and putting it on top of each chocolate. Well as you can see, that didn't work out so well. Didn't help that my chocolate was a little cooler and thicker than I really wanted it to be (as I was doing a small batch I didn't pull out the melter). The one plus to the whole ordeal was that I finally used a wire across the bowl for scraping, and everyone is right, that works SO much better!

IMG_1231-resized.jpg


Edited by YetiChocolates (log)

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Willow I think that your experiment would work if your chocolate was warmer and more fluid. I have dipped pieces and put them on a texture sheet... worked quite well.Give it another try!


Edited by curls (log)

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I haven't made any confections for probably over a year now, and figured I had better get warmed up for the 2014 Chocolate & Confections Workshop: I sort of hoped it would be like riding a bike, so of course I didn't bother reviewing any written instructions or anything intelligent like that. It took me three tries to get the temper right (tabling), but I did finally manage to nail that. However, I overheated the colored cocoa butter, I forgot to smack the molds when casting the shells, and I let the chocolate get too cool (so the shells are too thick). Doh!

DSC_1185.jpg

Moral of the story: read over your notes before trying something you haven't done in a long time!

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IMG_1129.jpg

 

IMG_1130.jpg

 

Here's what happens when your cello covered bunnies/eggs are exposed to the sun.  Laser beams of light develop.  Strange that they seem to have gone for the eyes!

 

Just like burning ants with a magnifying glass.

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ooh - i could fill this whole thread by myself.  have been experimenting with airbrushing and stencils.  it feels like it WILL work - eventually - bit it really isn't at the moment...

 

20150213_170333_zps8mwepj2a.jpg

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Oooh I'm so glad this thread was started as I know I'll have a LOT to post here! :) 

 

I sprayed some molds with CB a few days ago, and then cast, filled, and covered them today.

Attached are images of my results:

 

image.jpg

 

image.jpg

 

image.jpg

 

1.  Corners:  The chocolate didn't reach the corners.  I have one of those small vibrating tables and I gave it a good amount of time on it (~1min).  The chocolate was also thinner because I threw in a little cocoa butter (knowing that I had corners to fill!), but still no dice.

 

2.  Cocoa butter finish:  The rectangles came out somewhat glossy, while the trianglular ones are splotchy with little circles (see close-up).  I did hit the molds with a couple of seconds with the heat gun because it was a bit chilly in my kitchen, but perhaps I gave it too much heat on the triangular mold?  Arrgghh soo frustrating!!  

 

Do you guys paint chocolate in your molds with a brush (prior to pouring chocolate in and then out) to ensure the corners are filled in?  

 

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17 hours ago, pastryani said:

Oooh I'm so glad this thread was started as I know I'll have a LOT to post here! :) 

 

I sprayed some molds with CB a few days ago, and then cast, filled, and covered them today.

Attached are images of my results:

 

image.jpg

 

image.jpg

 

image.jpg

 

1.  Corners:  The chocolate didn't reach the corners.  I have one of those small vibrating tables and I gave it a good amount of time on it (~1min).  The chocolate was also thinner because I threw in a little cocoa butter (knowing that I had corners to fill!), but still no dice.

 

2.  Cocoa butter finish:  The rectangles came out somewhat glossy, while the trianglular ones are splotchy with little circles (see close-up).  I did hit the molds with a couple of seconds with the heat gun because it was a bit chilly in my kitchen, but perhaps I gave it too much heat on the triangular mold?  Arrgghh soo frustrating!!  

 

Do you guys paint chocolate in your molds with a brush (prior to pouring chocolate in and then out) to ensure the corners are filled in?  

 

Did the cocoa butter not get into the corners, or did it get left there because of the bubbles?

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I get the same thing, there will be cocoa butter in the corners of the mould still :D

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Edit:  Pastrygirl - the CB did get into the corners, but didn't stick to anything because of the bubbles.


Edited by pastryani (log)

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Toothpick down into the corners - I've given up on some molds like these because I'm too lazy to work that hard to prevent bubbles.

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Here's a chocolate fail for you - how on earth do molds end up like this? 

I went to a cooking school liquidation sale this morning, was expecting used equipment but not quite so abused!

IMG_7022.thumb.JPG.d93c65351052bf41162e807a8c7ffd8d.JPG

 

I did pick through and found several that looked in good shape.  They can toss this one in the recycle bin!

  • Sad 2

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5 minutes ago, pastrygirl said:

Here's a chocolate fail for you - how on earth do molds end up like this? 

I went to a cooking school liquidation sale this morning, was expecting used equipment but not quite so abused!

IMG_7022.thumb.JPG.d93c65351052bf41162e807a8c7ffd8d.JPG

 

I did pick through and found several that looked in good shape.  They can toss this one in the recycle bin!

Liquid nitrogen perhaps?

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My guess is repeated hot dishwasher cycles. I have a small polycarbonate grinder that goes on my stick mixer that has done exactly the same thing from the dishwasher.

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56 minutes ago, keychris said:

My guess is repeated hot dishwasher cycles. I have a small polycarbonate grinder that goes on my stick mixer that has done exactly the same thing from the dishwasher.

 

Ahhhh, so that's why you don't put chocolate molds in the dishwasher!

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On 7/2/2012 at 11:58 AM, Kerry Beal said:

DSCN0089.jpg

The infamous Greweling Buckwheat Dog Turds! A classic.

Failure to table the ganache enough, failure to produce 25mm discs for the bottoms (these are more like 35 mm - so my ganache amounts are wrong) and failure to pipe evenly - which is pretty difficult when you are piping something this liquid.

Right at the bottom of the upslope on the learning curve!

 

This has actually given me an idea for a Christmas 'gift' in honor of our new dog. :D Sometimes failures are inspiration in disguise?

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Oh how I hate to have something to post here! Chocolate has such a way of humbling you! Just when I think I know what I'm doing, this happens. I lost about 30 out of 220 pieces. When they stuck, the whole tray stuck. I can't figure out why. It is always at the tip. I cut them and the chocolate at the tip is no thinner than the rest. It happened on lightly sprayed as well as heavily sprayed. CB was at 90F when I sprayed. The key lime ones were sprayed at the same time, shelled at the same time with the same milk chocolate. Piped at the same time and sat overnight together. Color and shape of the mold are the only differences I can see. Green are lovely and didn't lose a single one. Someone tell me why oh why.

IMG_0080.thumb.jpg.a5e9e255e64822bf586c3e0aa77e7fdc.jpgIMG_0083.thumb.jpg.b74d754aea087db96854cb0305996902.jpg

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11 minutes ago, Chocolot said:

Someone tell me why oh why.

 

As I learned explaining this sort of thing to two different types of patients. For the first "who knows the ways of the Lord", for the others "shit happens"!

 

Does it happen to that particular mold a lot?

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It happens rarely, but usually that mold. Other times, we use that mold for months without a problem.

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