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Mette

Chocolates with that backroom finish

67 posts in this topic

I received some new heart molds I ordered from JB Prince. After wiping them out I made a champagne gananche to fill dark chocolate shells. They came out pretty shiny. No cocoa butter, just straight chocolate.

champagne hearts.jpg


Steve Lebowitz

Doer of All Things

Steven Howard Confections

Slicing a warm slab of bacon is a lot like giving a ferret a shave. No matter how careful you are, somebody's going to get hurt - Alton Brown, "Good Eats"

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Another consideration: if there is a crack, air can get to the ganache. If it is a alow time, you can end up with mold under your shell. Disgusting. I use them for samples and make sure they are consumed within a few days. This is in addition to the 'failure feelings'.

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Kerry, I wanted to thank you again for the reminder that the rejects can be re-purposed. Management hadn't eaten too many of the cracked ones I had left in the office, so I took them back and melted them down with a little cream and another splash of bourbon. That plus a the extra filling I had saved ended up being the perfect amount to fill two molds of 32. All came out perfect, shiny, and sell-able! As with so many aspects of cooking, it's not about never making mistakes, it's about knowing how to fix them. Thanks! :wub:

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Mmmm, purrrple...

What's the flavor?

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6961702434_382e9b50af_z.jpg

Check out the chocolate on the right - it's my leftover that was supposedly in temper - I scraped out the stuff in the glass cup measure (that's on the bottom) then dumped the remainder of the stuff from the piping bag on top of it. Weirdly the chocolate from the piping bag that I used to decorate the pieces of licorice was fine.

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Sooo, y'know how sometimes you have a nice cocoa butter swirl in your molds that seems to be in temper, but when you unmold the finished pieces half of them have spots where the color has flaked off? Do we know exactly why that happens? Cocoa butter too hot, too cold, too much agitation? Agitating when semi-set because you just can't leave well enough alone?

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There always seems to be a piece or two that gets in the way of the mold when I'm banging the last few stuck ones out....also known as samples for the chef :laugh:

IMG_0636.jpg

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There always seems to be a piece or two that gets in the way of the mold when I'm banging the last few stuck ones out....also known as samples for the chef :laugh:

IMG_0636.jpg

Lol, I do that too! Usually with me, it's just nicks, but I always catch more than just one under the mold.

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There always seems to be a piece or two that gets in the way of the mold when I'm banging the last few stuck ones out....also known as samples for the chef :laugh:

IMG_0636.jpg

I think we've all had that happen. I'm always a bit saddened when a piece suicides by dropping out of the mold just as I'm starting my down stroke to bang it out.


Steve Lebowitz

Doer of All Things

Steven Howard Confections

Slicing a warm slab of bacon is a lot like giving a ferret a shave. No matter how careful you are, somebody's going to get hurt - Alton Brown, "Good Eats"

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I think we've all had that happen. I'm always a bit saddened when a piece suicides by dropping out of the mold just as I'm starting my down stroke to bang it out.

I've developed something of a neuroses about it, in fact: I've fallen into a stupidly complicated sequence of unmolding steps to ensure that it happens as seldom as possible.


Chris Hennes
Director of Operations
chennes@egullet.org

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I think we've all had that happen. I'm always a bit saddened when a piece suicides by dropping out of the mold just as I'm starting my down stroke to bang it out.

Bon bon suicides, so sad :sad:

I've developed something of a neuroses about it, in fact: I've fallen into a stupidly complicated sequence of unmolding steps to ensure that it happens as seldom as possible.

Do tell.... who doesn't love neurotic overly complicated confectionery? But I guess a sheet pan or something would save some losses...

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DSCN0089.jpg

The infamous Greweling Buckwheat Dog Turds! A classic.

Failure to table the ganache enough, failure to produce 25mm discs for the bottoms (these are more like 35 mm - so my ganache amounts are wrong) and failure to pipe evenly - which is pretty difficult when you are piping something this liquid.

Right at the bottom of the upslope on the learning curve!

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Kerry,

Peter would be soooo disappointed:-)


Ruth Kendrick

Chocolot
Artisan Chocolates and Toffees
www.chocolot.com

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Kerry, Wow! So, were you able to salvage them and turn them into something beautiful and tasty?

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bad.jpg

I'm sure everyone has seen these before... ;)

Out of temper milk chocolate *sigh*

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Yikes, what happened there? DId the top of the bonbon stick to the mold and the bottom break off? What a nightmare cleaning those molds!

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exactly... There was a smear of milk (test looked OK, buta fter 20 minutes the test had bloomed) on the top of the chocolate (base of mold) and it didn't contract away from the surface, stuck, had to bash the bejeezus out of it to get them to come out... luckily there were plenty of people on hand willing to taste test those ones LOL

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exactly... There was a smear of milk (test looked OK, buta fter 20 minutes the test had bloomed) on the top of the chocolate (base of mold) and it didn't contract away from the surface, stuck, had to bash the bejeezus out of it to get them to come out... luckily there were plenty of people on hand willing to taste test those ones LOL

Some time, and sometimes some more time, in the freezer will usually help the more stubborn ones come out. Then even if they aren't pretty, they are more intact.

A different kind of disappointment: happily made three molds of bonbons on Tuesday for a catering order I had next week. Checked the banquet menus today, and no more chocolates on that party. :angry: Oh well, guess we'll see how well they freeze, and if nothing else they can be part of the spread at my brother's wedding in 6 weeks. That's what I get for trying to stay ahead.

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Fail. That'll teach me to work all day and forget to check my chocolate...

rsz_1rsz_img_1834.jpg


Sian

"You can't buy happiness, but you can buy chocolate, and that's kinda the same thing really."

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