Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create a free account.

Quick Tempering Chocolate using vegetable oil


Recommended Posts

Perfect for Dipping by Melissa Clark is an article I found yesterday online in the NYT.

What's this? Quick tempering of chocolate using a neutral vegetable oil? Why have I never noticed this before? Is this a terrible thing to do? I see that it 'lasts' only two days or so. What would I use it for?

Of course I'm going to try it...the courverture, Guittard's Bittersweet, is out on the counter...but I'm really curious to know what, if anything, anyone else has to report about this technique.

Edited by Darienne (log)

Darienne

 

learn, learn, learn...

 

Life in the Meadows and Rivers

Cheers & Chocolates

Link to post
Share on other sites

About one hour later.

The chocolate drips on the Pyrex bowl, which is sitting beside the sink, are still in a liquid state.

The decanted thin flat discs and the tiny egg shapes are molded and done. Out of a short stay in the freezer and into an acrylic container. Very little snap. The eggs are still sort of softish in their middles. The discs are hard. No smearing on my fingers when tested. But smears from the decanted molds.

Didn't try dipping anything into the chocolate.

Still no idea of what use this technique would be for me. We don't dip fruit or anything else into chocolate to eat right away. Maybe it would work also with candied citrus or ginger peel. Don't have any right now. But then it lasts in a hardened state for only a couple of days. Then what happens???

Forgot to add that the chocolate bits are fairly shiny. Look nice enough. Some discs have a bit of snap to them. Others have none.

...but then I might have done it all wrong to begin with... :hmmm:

Edited by Darienne (log)

Darienne

 

learn, learn, learn...

 

Life in the Meadows and Rivers

Cheers & Chocolates

Link to post
Share on other sites

Two hours. All snap in the discs is gone. The little half eggs are soggy. Still good tasting, but no snap at all.

But then Melissa Clark used only a 'couple of drops' of oil...although those were pretty big 'drops' in the video...and I used 1 tablespoon canola per 3 oz of chocolate which the recipe stipulated.

Still... it was fun to do an 'experiment'.

Darienne

 

learn, learn, learn...

 

Life in the Meadows and Rivers

Cheers & Chocolates

Link to post
Share on other sites

(1)Vegetable oil is liquid at room temperature.

(2)Cocoa butter is solid at room temperature.

(3)The more oil you put in perfectly good chocolate, the softer the chocolate will become, and the "greasier" the mouthfeel will become.

These facts will ever change irregardless of which TV prsonality or author is flogging "a new way" of tempring chocolate.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Following on from Edward J's points above, I think I've read about this before and basically, you are not tempering the chocolate by adding oil. You're altering the chocolate into a non-chocolate substance that doesn't need tempering (sort of like compound chocolate).

I'm a little hazy on the science here, but I'm sure someone will jump in and correct me if I'm wrong (which I may well be)

Edited by gap (log)
Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes, you are definitely messing with the chemistry of the fat (cocoa butter) by adding vegetable oil. I can't say exactly how, but you're not going to get a good temper or shine. There is no quick fix for properly tempered, pure chocolate.

Jeffrey Stern

www.jeffreygstern.com

http://bit.ly/cKwUL4

http://destination-ecuador.net

cocoapodman at gmail dot com

Link to post
Share on other sites

gap. That's exactly what I thought, but I wanted to try it anyway to see what would happen.

Sebastian. I wouldn't call the video homemade, nor did Clark suggest that anything she did was new to anyone.

Still it was interesting to try. The results have now been melted, with whipping cream and seedless raspberry jam added and are a ganache for DH to nibble on as is his wont.

Darienne

 

learn, learn, learn...

 

Life in the Meadows and Rivers

Cheers & Chocolates

Link to post
Share on other sites

gap. That's exactly what I thought, but I wanted to try it anyway to see what would happen.

That's the spirit! Trying something new (or new to you) is almost always worthwhile. Even if you're not happy with the result, you are now definitively not happy with it. You know exactly what you weren't happy about. Even if someone had said that it absolutely would not do what it was supposed to do before you tried it, that still wouldn't tell you what it does do. Maybe something will come along down the road that the result would be perfect for. When it does, you'll already know what you need for the job.

It's kinda like wrestling a gorilla... you don't stop when you're tired, you stop when the gorilla is tired.

Link to post
Share on other sites

gap. That's exactly what I thought, but I wanted to try it anyway to see what would happen.

That's the spirit! Trying something new (or new to you) is almost always worthwhile. Even if you're not happy with the result, you are now definitively not happy with it. You know exactly what you weren't happy about. Even if someone had said that it absolutely would not do what it was supposed to do before you tried it, that still wouldn't tell you what it does do. Maybe something will come along down the road that the result would be perfect for. When it does, you'll already know what you need for the job.

Thanks for those encouraging words, T2C. It was a good experience and as pretty much always we can eat the mistakes. :wub:

Darienne

 

learn, learn, learn...

 

Life in the Meadows and Rivers

Cheers & Chocolates

Link to post
Share on other sites

Wow, I expect more from the NYT. The candy/deep fry thermometer she had would be useless for tempering chocolate because candy thermometers are for much higher temperatures and don't even register below 100F. Then she leaves dipped items on a wire rack to drain and harden? And they are not going to harden around the wires and get stuck? I'm skeptical... :hmmm:

Link to post
Share on other sites

The results have now been melted, with whipping cream and seedless raspberry jam added and are a ganache for DH to nibble on as is his wont.

Sounds like someone came out a winner from this

Link to post
Share on other sites

gap. That's exactly what I thought, but I wanted to try it anyway to see what would happen.

Sebastian. I wouldn't call the video homemade, nor did Clark suggest that anything she did was new to anyone.

Still it was interesting to try. The results have now been melted, with whipping cream and seedless raspberry jam added and are a ganache for DH to nibble on as is his wont.

You may not, i would. It's defiantly not production quality. She's inferring that she's got a 'new' way of 'tempering' that doesn't require one to actually temper. Which would be new science, and against physical laws that we know to be true. Quite amateurish at best, terrible research and misleading at worst. I applaud you for looking at new ways to do things, don't get me wrong, it's the piece i'm criticizing. We do, however, already know the answer to this one.

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Similar Content

    • By Douglas K
      I made my fifth ever batch of chocolate over the weekend, a 45% milk chocolate. I did the usual warming of everything, and the batch started off without a hitch. After running 24 hours I got ready to cool the chocolate to temper, and the stone seemed awfully hot. Sure enough the chocolate was 147 degrees F. Normally it comes out at around 120. The chocolate seemed kind of thick, but this is my first batch as low as 45%, so not sure if that’s normal. The chocolate tempered just fine, and tastes fine for have gotten so hot. I’m wondering if I got a minuscule amount of water in the batch? I’m not sure how that would have happened, though thinking of everything ad nauseum I can think of possibilities. The ingredients themselves are all ones I’ve used before without issue, though first time with the roasted nibs, but they came from the same reliable source as all my other nibs. Just curious if anyone else has seen this happen.
    • By Wisper
      Hi, 

      I need to make portions of exactly 12g (=0.423oz) of truffle ganache. 
      These truffles will be packed in a cardboard box with the total weight written on the package - so I cannot mess up... 

      What solutions do you have to control the weight of the ganache for truffles?
      I tried to measure them on the scale but it's time consuming and not very reliable... 
       
      I bought a silicone mould - the cavities are too small and the ganache seems to stick to the mould.
       
      Have you tried to make your own shells for truffles?
      It's not very clear how many cm in the mould will translate in how many grams in the product....
       
      any suggestion will be appreciated.
    • By Douglas K
      I am new to chocolate, but have been a home cook all my life. I have been reading here for awhile as I go on my chocolate journey. I learn a lot from the things I read here, but I really don’t have a lot to contribute since I am such a novice, especially with chocolate, so I thought I’d share something light with the community to hopefully give you something fun to take your mind off of some of our intensity these days. Sunday I made my second batch ever of bonbons, and they’re made with my own chocolate, a lavender ganache filling with a little taste of salted caramel. I saw this little guy on top of one of my leaf bonbons offering to protect it from any renegade bugs as they sat on the counter. I love these little jumping spiders, and they’re welcome in my house any time. Cute little sucker who hung out for quite awhile. Anyhow, something lighter for your day.

    • By eglies
      Hello everyone. 
       
      Ive encountered some issues with my truffles. 
      I use truffle shells and have made a caramel recipe and it seems to be leaking. Any tips on what i should do?
       
      Attached is a photo to show a clear image of what i am describing!
       
      Thankss 😀
      IMG_6005.pdf
    • By Chris Hennes
      I'm making another cooking video, this time about a chocolate cake from The Geeky Chef Cookbook. And the frosting recipe is basically garbage: 1 stick of butter to 165 grams (1 3/4 cups!!!!) of cocoa powder. So in the video I need to say something along the lines of "A normal frosting recipe has more like XX cocoa powder per stick of butter." So can I get a quick spot-check here? For your preferred cocoa-powder-based frosting recipe, how much cocoa powder per stick of butter? I don't actually know how much I added in the end, the cameras were rolling so I just added cocoa and sugar until it tasted good!
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...