Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create a free account.

Mini Food Processor Suggestions


DanM
 Share

Recommended Posts

My trusty old Cuisinart 3 cup mini-prep is starting to die. I can smell the motor burning. It has served me well for the past few years and I am tempted to buy another. Are there any other options I should consider, especially commercial models?

Thanks!

"Salt is born of the purest of parents: the sun and the sea." --Pythagoras.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

If your mini-prep has served you well, why are you looking to change? I love mine and they are cheap enough to be practically disposable. I can't imagine there are any commercial versions as restaurants don't usually have much need for tiny processors.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 years later...

Based on what I've been playing around with in the kitchen these days, I think my next purchase will be a mini food processor.  I'm mostly looking to make some sauces (like peanut sauce) and dressings using fruits and vegetables, maybe chopping and pureeing garlic .... essentially, simple little tasks.

 

I understand that most of these are not very powerful, but for my purposes such a processor should be fine.

 

What do the cognoscenti recommend?

Edited by Shel_B (log)

 ... Shel


 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Have to back what Lisa says. I have a stick blender. It was basically a second attachment that came with my (admittedly decent) burr grinder. Whenever I want to make curry paste (i.e. lots of ingredients like garlic clove-sized bits and pieces), puree a soup or perform the kind of task you're describing, I load the ingredients into a plastic jug. This was just a cheap, shitty jug. A dollar, maybe two. I intentionally bought something tall so 'splash back' wasn't an issue. You can even puree hot things.

Chris Taylor

Host, eG Forums - ctaylor@egstaff.org

 

I've never met an animal I didn't enjoy with salt and pepper.

Melbourne
Harare, Victoria Falls and some places in between

Link to comment
Share on other sites

711smTh1rlL._SL1500_.jpgAmazon. 

 

http://www.amazon.com/Cuisinart-DLC-2ABC-Mini-Prep-Processor-Brushed/dp/B0000645YM/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&camp=1789&creative=9325&creativeASIN=http://www.amazon.com/Cuisinart-DLC-2ABC-Mini-Prep-Processor-Brushed/dp/B0000645YM&linkCode=as2&tag=egulletcom-20">$36.

 

No analyses paralysis necessary.

  • Like 3

Mitch Weinstein aka "weinoo"

Tasty Travails - My Blog

My eGullet FoodBog - A Tale of Two Boroughs

Was it you baby...or just a Brilliant Disguise?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Mitch, what's the difference between the chop and grind functions on the Mini-Prep?

 

And before Blether leaps in, let me recommend what he's going to recommend - the Iwatani Millser.

That sucker is over $100 - my guess is it ain't happening.

 

From the manual...

 

  Use the chop function for chopping, puréeing and mixing. It is the right choice, for example, for chopping soft, fragile food such as herbs, celery,

onions, garlic and most cheeses. It is also the right choice for puréeing cooked vegetables, making mayonnaise and mixing salad dressing.

Pulse action is best when you are using the chop function. Two or three pulses are often enough. Be sure to check the food frequently to

prevent overprocessing. If you overprocess, you are likely to get a watery paste instead of a fine chop.

 

Use the grind function for grinding spices, and for chopping hard food such as peppercorns,

seeds, chocolate and nuts.

 

Mitch Weinstein aka "weinoo"

Tasty Travails - My Blog

My eGullet FoodBog - A Tale of Two Boroughs

Was it you baby...or just a Brilliant Disguise?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I have a miniprep and love it. Costs around $35 on Amazon.

 

It isn't going to make dough and its not rugged, but for sauces or lots of chopping, esp if you have arthritis, its great.

 

Stick blender is good too, but it won't chop

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

My Kitchen Aide immersion blender also has a mini chopper/processing attachment. I use it all the time - especially since my Mini-Cuisanart died about a week after I acquired the blender. It's a 2 1/2 cup plastic jar with a chopper blade; the power stick attaches to the top. It works great.

Elaina

If you have a garden and a library, you have everything you need. Cicero

But the library must contain cookbooks. Elaina

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I have a Cuisinart Mini-Prep, eh...It's okay for some really small jobs but I use a immersion blender or a knife much more often...probably 200 to 1.

I can't imagine a small food processor working well for peanut butter, that takes some power.

~Martin :)

I just don't want to look back and think "I could have eaten that."

Unsupervised, rebellious, radical agrarian experimenter, minimalist penny-pincher, and adventurous cook. Crotchety, cantankerous, terse curmudgeon, non-conformist, and contrarian who questions everything!

The best thing about a vegetable garden is all the meat you can hunt and trap out of it!

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I see that now, you wrote "sauce"...that's what happens when I don't wear my glasses and speed read.  :blink:

~Martin :)

I just don't want to look back and think "I could have eaten that."

Unsupervised, rebellious, radical agrarian experimenter, minimalist penny-pincher, and adventurous cook. Crotchety, cantankerous, terse curmudgeon, non-conformist, and contrarian who questions everything!

The best thing about a vegetable garden is all the meat you can hunt and trap out of it!

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The Mini-Prep would probably be okay for a small batch of something like that if you didn't plan to use it frequently but I'm reluctant to recommend it...it's not the best quality.

I expected mine to give-out a long time ago, it heats up pretty easily.

~Martin :)

I just don't want to look back and think "I could have eaten that."

Unsupervised, rebellious, radical agrarian experimenter, minimalist penny-pincher, and adventurous cook. Crotchety, cantankerous, terse curmudgeon, non-conformist, and contrarian who questions everything!

The best thing about a vegetable garden is all the meat you can hunt and trap out of it!

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I own a Braun Multi Mix, but it's a really old model they no longer make. The newer ones (Multi Quick) seem ok, amazon independent sellers have a good price. It's a motor you can put a stick blender or tiny food processor onto. I rarely use the food processor attachment, generally just when I want to chop a lot of onion fast. No grating, though.

 

I bought a couple of sizes of steel milkshake machine cups (they show up at thrift shops all the time, and Restaurant Depot sells them for $3) and use them with the immersion blender for smaller quantities. For larger amounts, you can obviously just use it in a pan.

 

I will point out that my mixer (Delonghi/Kenwood) has a full sized food processor attachment, continuous grater/shredder attachment, and a mini prep food processor attachment.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I have the cuisinart pictured above, works fine. I make pesto in it, hot sauces, things like that. Does what it's supposed to do and is cheap. Before that I had also a Braun (I think) which was a bit smaller overall, also worked great. Eventually the blade part broke on the inside, where the stick that goes to the motor goes. Was easier to just buy a new machine than try to find the kinve and order it back then. I like having these small machines, for smaller amounts I don't like using the big machine and it would not do a good job on smaller amounts anyway, the blades would just fly over what ever I put in there.

  • Like 2

"And don't forget music - music in the kitchen is an essential ingredient!"

- Thomas Keller

Diablo Kitchen, my food blog

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Buy the Cuisinart mini chopper.  I have one and I also have a Bamix immersion blender.  They do not perform the same functions.

For little blending/chopping jobs like chopping nuts or herbs or blending small wet ingredients, the Cusinart is fantastic; big enough, yet not too big.  Easy to clean too.  I love mine and one of its best features is that it holds the blade in place until you remove it - no more falling off into the food!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The Mini-Prep would probably be okay for a small batch of something like that if you didn't plan to use it frequently but I'm reluctant to recommend it...it's not the best quality.

I expected mine to give-out a long time ago, it heats up pretty easily.

 

In the past, I had a small Cuisinart and a small Kitchenaid, neither of which lasted very long.  However, I was using them for grinding/chopping small amounts of meat, and I suppose that taxed their motors and construction.  So I understand your concern.  My needs now are less strenuous, and use would not be as frequent (I was grinding meat every day), so maybe these smaller machines would suffice.

 

Should I decide on one of these, the question is which brand and model would be best, would be the most durable.  I hadn't thought about using an immersion blender for the tasks mentioned in my original post, so maybe that's a better way to go <shrug>

 ... Shel


 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Buy the Cuisinart mini chopper. [...] I love mine and one of its best features is that it holds the blade in place until you remove it - no more falling off into the food!

 

What machines have a blade that falls off into the food?

 ... Shel


 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 Share

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...