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eG Foodblog: Chris Hennes (2012) - Chocolate, Tamales, Modernism, etc.


Chris Hennes
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When we talk about chocolates with that showroom finish, this:

Finished chocolates 1.jpg

is what we are talking about.

YYEEEEEAAAAHHHHHH!!! Finally, after years of trying, today I have an entry for that topic! Yes! (yes, I really am that excited, this is far an away the best batch of chocolates I've ever made. Also, the taste is fantastic too).

Here's the interior:

Finished chocolates 2.jpg

Chris Hennes
Director of Operations
chennes@egullet.org

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I've never tried to overwinter parsnips before. Are these still going to taste good?

I think they might taste better.

Beauties on the chocolates, dude. I could eat a dozen or so right now.

Mitch Weinstein aka "weinoo"

Tasty Travails - My Blog

My eGullet FoodBog - A Tale of Two Boroughs

Was it you baby...or just a Brilliant Disguise?

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Good Lord, Chris, those chocolates are breath taking!

We don't have any weeds going on here, yet. I wish we did!

You getting any storms right now? We had some hail a bit ago...seems a bit tornado-ish....

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Apart from my envy that Oklahoma seems to have markets that put the nation's capital to shame, I'm staggered that such chocolates can be made by hand at home. They look superb!

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You getting any storms right now? We had some hail a bit ago...seems a bit tornado-ish....

They just passed over as I was filling the tamales. Speaking of which:

Here is the batter after the last 1/2 cup of stock was added and it was re-beaten

Finished batter.jpg

The filling is ricotta and red chard, steamed and tossed with the remaining garlic:

Red chard.jpg

Here is my assembly station:

Station.jpg

Step 1:

Assembly 1.jpg

Step 2:

Assembly 2.jpg

Step 3:

Assembly 3.jpg

And finally into the steamer. I don't have the right kind of steamer for this, so I just sort of tie them together into a standard vegetable steamer.

Ready to steam.jpg

So those are steaming now, and I've got the vegetables for the beet salad roasting as well:

Vegetables.jpg

Chris Hennes
Director of Operations
chennes@egullet.org

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the "station" concept is very very key.

even better is to get a person at each station.

margaritas work well for this.

Yes, absolutely: you need everything in front of you. I've never tried doing it assembly-line style. Even when I've made tamales with a group of people everyone had their own stations (sometimes with shared bowls in the middle. And add my vote for tamale-making with margaritas (preferably with a few friends over to enjoy them with).

Chris Hennes
Director of Operations
chennes@egullet.org

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Hello, almost-neighbor (I'm some 5 hours to the southeast). Looking forward to this. One of these days, I'll get ambitious enough to make my own tamales. Anxious to see what you have in store for us!

(edited to change directions)

Edited by kayb (log)

Don't ask. Eat it.

www.kayatthekeyboard.wordpress.com

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Impressive markets Chris! Who knew such bounty was available in OK.

You take us to the place that must fry loads of chicharonnes and don't show us some or tell us about them - not fair :shock: . Have you had them, and what style or styles do they offer?

The chocolates are quite impressive. As I recall you are not a sweets person. Who currently has the pleasure of sampling your confectionary wares?

I see you are in the open-end school regarding tamale wrapping. Is that per the recipe or have you found that preference from experience? Also the string is new to me; again an experiencial result?

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On 1329785487' post='1864369, heidih said:


Impressive markets Chris! Who knew such bounty was available in OK.


Sure not me, when I moved here! I think I've been into dozens of markets in the metro area to find these gems. But man, now that I've found them! There are very, very few ingredients that I cannot find locally (not counting various Modernist powders, etc. that everyone orders over the internet anyway). I was worried when we moved to Oklahoma that finding ingredients would be a problem, and it turns out that with enough searching, you can get it all.

Quote


You take us to the place that must fry loads of chicharonnes and don't show us some or tell us about them - not fair :shock: . Have you had them, and what style or styles do they offer?


The only thing I have ever bought at that mercado is the lard, actually: it's typically my last stop on the grocery tour because of its location, so by that point I've got everything already, and have often just eaten lunch.

Quote


The chocolates are quite impressive. As I recall you are not a sweets person. Who currently has the pleasure of sampling your confectionary wares?


Thanks. You're right: I ate two of them, which was enough sugar to last me a week. These will go into my wife's office tomorrow, I think.

Quote


I see you are in the open-end school regarding tamale wrapping. Is that per the recipe or have you found that preference from experience? Also the string is new to me; again an experiencial result?


I didn't even realize that with corn husks closing them off was an option: I close banana leaf tamales, but leave the corn open. I never really thought about it, it's the way Consuelo Hester taught us at the tamale-making workshop I went to a few years ago. I use string because a) I an not as deft at producing them quickly as the real pros, so I like to make sure mine are tied at the bottom and b) I find it easier to work with than shredded corn husks for the same purpose. I have a huge spool of butcher's twine: may as well get some use out of it!

Chris Hennes
Director of Operations
chennes@egullet.org

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Here are the roasted beets and onions:

Roasted beets.jpg

And the roasted poblanos:

Roasted peppers.jpg

That gets tossed with lime juice, Worcestershire, and cilantro and served at room temp. My wife got hold of the camera and shot this:

Me.jpg

Here are the steamed tamales:

Cooked tamales.jpg

And here it is served:

Dinner.jpg

Chris Hennes
Director of Operations
chennes@egullet.org

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Why, what did you have ScottyBoy?

Snack time: salsa. Straightforward prep, made in a food processor in three steps. I like the Muir Glen whole tomatoes for this one.

Ingredients:

DSC_0130.jpg

Step one, hand chop garlic fine, onion coarse, slice chile, add with salt and lime juice to food processor:

DSC_0132.jpg

Pulse a few times to chop:

DSC_0135.jpg

Add whole tomato

DSC_0137.jpg

Stir in tomato puree and serve:

DSC_0138.jpg

A little thinner than usual tonight: there were only two whole tomatoes in the can this time, the rest was puree (usually there are three).

Chris Hennes
Director of Operations
chennes@egullet.org

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So what is the delivery vehicle for the salsa?

The tamales especially with the side vegetables sound really appealing. I must explore this. My Cuban neighbor made a chard and soft cheese tamale at her last tamale party and it was excellent.

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