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Chris Hennes

eG Foodblog: Chris Hennes (2012) - Chocolate, Tamales, Modernism, etc.

329 posts in this topic

Speaking of parties: in the interest of completeness, I think I ate three Doritos at the party I was at tonight. Sorry, no photos...


Chris Hennes
Director of Operations
chennes@egullet.org

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Onions poached in butter for two hours? Delicious. I expect they would be pretty caramelized. Mix up a quick French Onion soup?

No, not caramelized at all, if I do it right: they are supposed to remain white, according to the recipe. And no beef stock on hand, alas. I'm trying to think of things I could fry them up with: presumably they will completely disintegrate, so that has to be OK in the dish.

I can't think of much of anything that wouldn't benefit from that. Except maybe ice cream.

Soubise, maybe?

Or I'd put it into a white sauce and make a hellacious scalloped potato casserole.


Don't ask. Eat it.

www.kayatthekeyboard.wordpress.com

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I appreciate all of the shout-outs for the smothered onion recipe, but all credit should go to Marcella Hazan. Chris, yours looks nice!

Chris, I am enjoying your adventurous cooking very much and will be sorry to see this blog end.

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I'm just catching up on your blog after a busy week.

This is what we use for composting:

http://www.walmart.com/ip/Canopy-12-Liter-Oval-Step-Can-Stainless-Steel/15728015

The foot pedal means we don't have to touch the stuff while cooking but it stays closed. There is a plastic liner that can be taken out to dump the contents, and rinsed when needed. It doesn't look ugly, and it is fairly inexpensive. And since the food contacts the plastic liner not the steel, it holds up pretty well. As for our compost pile, I have horses, so everything is just incorporated into the considerable manure pile at the back of the property.

Where did you get your wok stand? It looks like something I would love to get for our patio!!!

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Thanks for a great week!


"Experience is something you gain just after you needed it" ....A Wise man

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great week

thx!

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Oh, thanks, rotuts. Another must have for when we finally build an outdoor kitchen. We moved and still own our old home, and need to sell that first... :sad:

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enjoyed this very much.

DITTO!!!

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It ain't over yet, folks: today is a big cooking day, I have a ton of components to make for the Modernist Cuisine Onion Tart, and am hoping to squeeze in a duck confit while I'm at it.


Chris Hennes
Director of Operations
chennes@egullet.org

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A question regarding the lasagne: Your Béchamel sauce seems very thick. Is that because the fresh pasta needs less liquid or do you always make it this way? I've never seen it made so paste-like.

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That was great, Chris. I learned a lot from your efforts. Many thanks.

(looking forward to today's work too!)


Edited by Trev (log)

There are 3 kinds of people in this world, those who are good at math and those who aren't.

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Thanks Chris!

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A question regarding the lasagne: Your Béchamel sauce seems very thick. Is that because the fresh pasta needs less liquid or do you always make it this way? I've never seen it made so paste-like.

It is a bit thicker (25% more roux) than a standard thickness bechamel, and it's also at refrigerator temperature.


Chris Hennes
Director of Operations
chennes@egullet.org

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Quick update before I run back to the stove: first, breakfast... a one-pump, nonfat, no-whip mocha

Starbucks.jpg

And, getting started on the onion stuff:

Onions on burner.jpg


Chris Hennes
Director of Operations
chennes@egullet.org

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I've been enjoying this immensely. Now finish with a bang!


Sleep, bike, cook, feed, repeat...

Chef Facebook HQ Menlo Park, CA

My eGullet Foodblog

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What do the labels say next to the pans?

The recipe it is for, the quantity, and what stage they are being cooked to.


Chris Hennes
Director of Operations
chennes@egullet.org

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Haha really! Imagine someone throwing ingredients in the general direction of pots and pans and you have me...


Sleep, bike, cook, feed, repeat...

Chef Facebook HQ Menlo Park, CA

My eGullet Foodblog

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