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Desperation Desserts


maggiethecat
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Linda, we cross posted -- what terrific staples. Katie, I was the only kid on the block who hated both hot dogs and peanut butter, a real PIA in the sixties, but I usually have some peanut butter in the house because I like pb cookies. Hmmmm. Margaret, merci.

Margaret McArthur

"Take it easy, but take it."

Studs Terkel

1912-2008

A sensational tennis blog from freakyfrites

margaretmcarthur.com

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Nuke some Brie, eat on crackers with lots of jam.

Got Brie, got crackers, got jam. Score!

I think this is particularly good with apricot preserves, which are easy to make, but which you also can buy in the stores, of course.

My first favorite, though, is southern fig preserves.

Which are a pain in the rear to make and which I have not been able to find in the stores. At least none that are any good.

So usually, apricot it is.

I don't understand why rappers have to hunch over while they stomp around the stage hollering.  It hurts my back to watch them. On the other hand, I've been thinking that perhaps I should start a rap group here at the Old Folks' Home.  Most of us already walk like that.

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Only rarely have I had distinguished guests, but I've done versions of this, for sure.

Well, I haven't had any distinguished guests in a long time and, when I did, it was because of my husband's job, and not because we were all chummy with them. :biggrin:

Maggie - this is my number one "I can't stand it any more diet be damned I have to have something decadent right now" dish. I've seen lots of similar versions, but usually come back to this one:

Chocolate Mousse

1 6-oz pkg good quality 100% chocolate semi-sweet chips

1 egg

1 tsp vanilla

1 T Creme de Cacao, Khalua, Xanath, Creme of Tequila, Bailey's, or other favorite liqueur

dash salt

1 C heavy whipping cream

Put everything into a blender EXCEPT for the cream. Fasten the top onto the blender, minus that little plastic thing in the middle.

Heat the cream to scalding. Just before the boil, turn on the blender and slowly pour the hot cream through the hole in the blender lid while the blender is running. Continue blending until the mixture is smooth.

Pour the hot mousse into individual ramekins. Put them into the fridge to cool. They're like chocolate pots de creme - very rich. When cold, serve them with a dollop of whipped cream on top. You can dust it with a little powdered instant coffee, or cinnamon, or nutmeg. I liked to serve them with one of those Pepperidge Farm rolled cookies alongside.

Maggie - obviously the idea is for them to chill. But when I just have to have what I have to have, I don't wait for them to completely chill and congeal. I just happily slurp away.

Oh, and KayB - I never told those distinguished guests how I made that delightful cobbler. Wanted them to think I'd really gone to a lot of trouble just for them. And I also never told them that I had made this mousse from chocolate chips in the blender before I served it in tiny elegant demitasse cups, complete with demitasse spoons, doilies in the saucers, and little embroidered napkins pulled through the cup handles. :laugh:

As I said, it was "Competitive Entertaining." For better or worse, that's how it was. Careers hung in the balance.

Edited by Jaymes (log)

I don't understand why rappers have to hunch over while they stomp around the stage hollering.  It hurts my back to watch them. On the other hand, I've been thinking that perhaps I should start a rap group here at the Old Folks' Home.  Most of us already walk like that.

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I will vouch for your recipe, Jaymes. It's a stunner. I used to make it with either Grand Marnier or Frangelico, both lovely. Thanks for the reminder.

:smile: Thanks!

It is remarkable how dense and rich the texture is. Honestly, I never would have guessed it took five minutes in a blender. I've got very difficult and tedious recipes for chocolate pots de creme that take all day (double boiler, bain marie, etc.) and are not one bit better.

Plus, you can't bake china demitasse cups or crystal sherry glasses or antique porcelain egg cups in a bain marie. So if presentation is your thang (as we say in Texas) the blender mousse has it all over those others.

I don't understand why rappers have to hunch over while they stomp around the stage hollering.  It hurts my back to watch them. On the other hand, I've been thinking that perhaps I should start a rap group here at the Old Folks' Home.  Most of us already walk like that.

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Cinnamon toast. Slice of bread preferably squishy white, slather with butter, sprinkle with cinnamon, top with white sugar. Broil til bubbly.

Oh heavens! Why have I forgotten cinnamon toast? When I was a tween I made it every night after school. My method was different: I'd smush some soft butter, cinnamon and brown sugar together and spread it on toast. I'll try your way soon.Not only is this topic providing me with swell new ideas, but they're taking me into the way back machine.

I'll try that mousse, Mz. Jaymes.

Margaret McArthur

"Take it easy, but take it."

Studs Terkel

1912-2008

A sensational tennis blog from freakyfrites

margaretmcarthur.com

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I can't resist our midnight desperation solution from the era before we learned the words " heartburn" and "insomnia": onion puffs. Cut the crusts off Wonder bread. Chop up several slices of onion. Mix with mayo. Spread on bread. Broil until bubbly. Cut into squares and enjoy.

Oh, the joy of youth!

eGullet member #80.

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I remembered this.

Stuffed Dates

chopped Marcona almonds

chopped candied ginger

chopped candied orange

sugar (optional)

madeira (optional)

dates

Cut a slit into the dates so that they hinge.

Spoon mixture into date.

Close date, reform.

Dates will appear whole.

I actually throw these in with other desserts because I like serving three desserts at a time and at least one of them has to be easy.

They make wonderful snacks on their own.

If you are talking staples, graham crackers and cream cheese.

I like to bake nice things. And then I eat them. Then I can bake some more.

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Listed in order of increasing desperation/laziness:

1. Chocolate pudding. The kind with just milk, cornstarch, chocolate, a little sugar, vanilla. I don't wait for it to cool.

2. The thing where you toss raspberries (usually frozen) with sour cream, top with brown sugar, and run it under the broiler. I think I got this recipe from Smitten Kitchen.

3. Dried apricot + square of chocolate. Shove the chocolate into the apricot. Eat. Repeat.

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microwave dulce de leche...1 can sweetened condensed milk in the pantry for just such emergencies. Dip pretzel in it for the sweet/salty thing. Particularly good with Snyder's Extra Dark pretzels.

"Only dull people are brilliant at breakfast" - Oscar Wilde

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No one has mentioned microwave "baked" apples.

I core an apple - especially like Golden Delicious fill the center with a mixture of cinnamon and brown sugar (I use granulated maple sugar because I buy it in bulk)

add pecans, or other nuts, pistachios are excellent, dried cranberries - raisins are okay.

I know someone who likes to fill the core with pepper jelly and sprinkle crumbled bacon over the top.

Microwave on high (900-1000 watt oven) for 2 - 2 1/2 minutes, longer for larger apples, dense varieties can take twice as long.

Top with heavy cream, sour cream, yogurt, cream cheese, any cheese that you like, and allow it to "rest" for 5 minutes or so.

The last procedure will save you from having burnt lips and tongue (I speak from experience).

Edited by andiesenji (log)

"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett

 

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I don't know if you consider this dessert. But I have to have something sweet every evening. I bake a lot, but always have on hand (for a baking hiatus): Dove Promises dark chocolate; good dried apricots; good slices of crystallized ginger. I place a piece of chocolate atop an apricot or slice of ginger, bit into it (two or three bites) and it is perfect. Mariani dried cherries are good too.

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I don't know if you consider this dessert. But I have to have something sweet every evening. I bake a lot, but always have on hand (for a baking hiatus): Dove Promises dark chocolate; good dried apricots; good slices of crystallized ginger. I place a piece of chocolate atop an apricot or slice of ginger, bit into it (two or three bites) and it is perfect. Mariani dried cherries are good too.

Brilliant -- made in no time.

Margaret McArthur

"Take it easy, but take it."

Studs Terkel

1912-2008

A sensational tennis blog from freakyfrites

margaretmcarthur.com

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No one has mentioned microwave "baked" apples.

Hmmm. This is a swell idea. I like the micro for fast and easy, and I have some pears. Thanks, this is so doable.

Margaret McArthur

"Take it easy, but take it."

Studs Terkel

1912-2008

A sensational tennis blog from freakyfrites

margaretmcarthur.com

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Not five minutes, but no more than 20 if you have the crisp topping ready to go: dice an apple of your choice and lightly sauté it with butter and sugar, put in large ramekin and top with streusel topping - I make a big batch and spread it out on a sheet pan to freeze, then store it in a ziplock in the freezer. Just pull out enough for your individual apple crisp, topp the apple and bake @ 400* for about 20 min. Also works fine with frozen fruit, tossed with a little flour and sugar - I've been making a strawberry-mango version lately.

More desperate times call for a cup of hot cocoa made with good quality cocoa powder, sugar (or Splenda), milk with fat content of your choice, and flavored with any number of flavorings I have on hand for baking: peppermint extract, espresso powder, vanilla, liquors, etc...

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Just pull out enough for your individual apple crisp, topp the apple and bake @ 400* for about 20 min.

This also works in a microwave. Just takes a few minutes to cook and then into a toaster oven to crisp it up.

I don't understand why rappers have to hunch over while they stomp around the stage hollering.  It hurts my back to watch them. On the other hand, I've been thinking that perhaps I should start a rap group here at the Old Folks' Home.  Most of us already walk like that.

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S'mores, toasted in the toaster oven.

If you don't have chocolate, peanut butter will do in a pinch. Or Nutella, or caramel sauce, and I bet condensed milk or jam would be delicious too.

If you're homicidally desperate, just have at the Nutella with a spoon. Or a finger. :smile:

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Meanwhile, back in the jam post, I have learned about Trader Joe's cherry preserves, which I found a bit too sweet and not unlike candied cherries and I can't wait to try them with chocolate. I think it will make a very passable chocolate-covered-cherry-not.

I bought a big, beautiful, cheap bag of imported foil covered chocolate eggs at Costco. Said eggs are hollow.

I'm thinking: small hole. Insert cherries.

Or: bite chocolate, spoon cherries into mouth, chew.

I like to bake nice things. And then I eat them. Then I can bake some more.

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Got a good blender?

Frozen banana, chocolate milk (JUST enough to get it blended) and some peanut butter if you want - comes out thick like barely melted soft serve, tastes great, take 3 minutes. Drink it like a milkshake.

If your bananas aren't frozen, use a bunch of ice cubes instead. Could also use regular milk, cocoa powder and some sugar (or honey, whatever).

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