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David Ross

eG Cook-Off 58: Hash

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I'm doing some early morning work that must get done, but all I can think about is that spam hash! That last picture is torturing me with deliciousness.


nunc est bibendum...

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...I never heard of putting cream in hash, but it sounds good. I didn't grow up kosher by any stretch of the imagination, but nor did my parents ever pour dairy products into a pot full of meat....

It's not at all uncommon, for instance...

Thank you Margaret for the Red Flannel Hash recipe. I've heard of red flannel hash but never had it. Today I made Golden Flannel Hash; I couldn't pass up a bunch of lovely organic golden beets with tops that I saw this morning, and I had some bacon and a few potatoes in the fridge. I'm very much liking the method of sauteing the onion and garlic, then removing it and adding it back to the potatoes after they have started to brown. The beets were roasted first, cooled and diced. The beet greens I cut in a rough chiffonade and sauteed them ahead. I finished them with a little bit of vinegar and maple syrup the way I do collards. The beets and onions and greens and cooked bacon went in with the onions.

The only surprise was that the beets were so sweet I thought I should have added just vinegar but no maple syrup at all to the greens. I thought about adding a little cream, but in the end decided against it. We topped our hash with fried eggs. My takeaway from that recipe is that greens in hash are fabulous, but beets should be used with restraint. For all I know the Yankees who invented Yankee red flannel hash like their hash sweet. Maybe it's a New England thing, like the preference for Boston clam chowder over Manhattan. Anyway it was hash, and it was good.

Chris, those morels look scrumptious. I used to do a lot of mushroom hunting but finally got so sick of ending up with poison oak that I just gave up my shroomin' ways.

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If you thought my earlier hashes were abominations, behold this gorgeous specimen:

tater tot hash.jpg

Yep, those are Tater Tots. In my defense, the potatoes I had intended to use turned out to be past their prime. Also, I like Tater Tots. The "meat" in this one is actually whole urad dal and jalapenos that I use as a nacho topping. And yes, those are over-easy, not poached, I know. So basically it contains no traditional hash ingredients at all.

The Tater Tots were not a 100% successful substitute for actual potatoes here: they didn't retain as much crispiness as I hoped they would. Not a total failure, but there's no need to run out to buy Tots for your next hash.


Chris Hennes
Director of Operations
chennes@egullet.org

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I can't remember being so seduced by Spam and Tater Tots. Many thanks, Chef Crash and Chris, er, I think...


eGullet member #80.

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Hey all --

With the return of home-grown asparagus, I made the Potato, Asparagus, and Pancetta hash that I mentioned earlier in this thread. Fantastic! Really recommend it...

PotatoAsparagusPancettaHash.jpg

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If you thought my earlier hashes were abominations, behold this gorgeous specimen:

tater tot hash.jpg

Yep, those are Tater Tots. In my defense, the potatoes I had intended to use turned out to be past their prime. Also, I like Tater Tots. The "meat" in this one is actually whole urad dal and jalapenos that I use as a nacho topping. And yes, those are over-easy, not poached, I know. So basically it contains no traditional hash ingredients at all.

The Tater Tots were not a 100% successful substitute for actual potatoes here: they didn't retain as much crispiness as I hoped they would. Not a total failure, but there's no need to run out to buy Tots for your next hash.

I love the idea of Tater Tots in hash, but how did you cook them? Did you bake or deep-fry the Tots before turning them into the hash? That might have given them the crispy texture you were looking for.

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Breakfast today...roast beef hash w onions and potatoes dressed with ketchup and sriracha. a nice wake up

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I love the idea of Tater Tots in hash, but how did you cook them? Did you bake or deep-fry the Tots before turning them into the hash? That might have given them the crispy texture you were looking for.

I just baked them, but these were the "Extra Crispy" variety of tots: they were crisp coming out of the oven, they just didn't stay that way when added to the dal and peppers.


Chris Hennes
Director of Operations
chennes@egullet.org

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I love the idea that hash is for leftovers. But what do you do with leftover hash? Two days ago I made hash from leftover partially cooked potatoes and leftover cooked chard and onions. Very tasty, crispy, cooked with a healthy dose of smoked paprika. Yesterday I made a spaghetti fritatta (tortilla espanola, take your pick) with leftover hash and leftover spaghetti. Excellent use of leftover crispy highly flavored potatoes; a labor intensive sub for tater tots no doubt, but then I don't remember the last time I craved a tater tot omelet. Perhaps never, not that it couldn't be good. The fritatta was way better very warm out of the oven than room temp later, but generally that's how I feel about any baked egg-type thing.

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I saute cubed corned beef, onions, cubed potatoes till cooked through. Throw in a few tbsp ketchup and a tsp  sriracha...toss a few times ...salt and pepper.

 

Irish stir fry. Tasty.

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11 hours ago, gfweb said:

Irish stir fry.

Do you serve it with Gaelic  bread?

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Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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Hash is a lovely thing in all its infinite variety.    Poultry, fish as delicious as the usual suspects.

 

We have a hash story in our family.    I took our son to a downtown cafeteria for lunch when he was about two.    I checked out the menu board and saw corned beef hash, a favorite of his.    I ordered my lunch and a half order of hash for the baby.   "Can't do half orders."   "No?"   Then he launches into a long explanation    The manager appears and asks what the problem is, is informed and announces, "Make a half order for the child."     "Thank you, sir."     So we get our order and sit at a booth.    Son WOLFS his hash and calls out, "More hash."  "Shhhh, there is no more hashh."   "More HASH!"   "SSHHHHHHH, that was plenty.   There is no more,"    "MORE HASHH!!!"       The rest is a blank in my mind.    We somehow got out of there.    But hash becane a family war cry.

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eGullet member #80.

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