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Goatjunky

What is your favorite tuna/pasta recipe?

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Not talking tuna casserole. I have quite a few jars of tuna, including belly, that i canned this past year. I am looking for some of your favorite recipes? I feel greedy about these jars and don't want to waste them on run of the mill.

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It's hard to go wrong with olive oil, garlic, hot pepper, tuna, and parsley tossed with pasta. I like to add some capers and a huge pile of parsley. Breadcrumbs, olives, sundried tomates, and pine nuts would also be worthy additions.

A pasta salad with tuna, broccoli, sliced onions, hot pepper, olive oil, and vinegar is also nice.

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I also find the simpler the better with good quality tuna. I used to get this really nice smoked tuna at the farmers market. I break it into chunks and toss it with cooked pasta, lemon olive oil (or olive oil and some lemon juice) and seasonings (salt, pepper, chili flake, etc.). The simple prep lets the beautiful tuna stand out.

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This was for fresh tuna but I don't see way canned wouldn't work... Diced tuna into 1/2" cubes. Added some white wine and a hand full of mint to a basic tomato sauce and cooked off the alcohol. Then I simmered the tuna in it until done and finished it with some cream after fishing out the mint. I thick I added that to Orecchiette. This was inspired by something I ate at Angelino's in Sausalito.

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I also find the simpler the better with good quality tuna. I used to get this really nice smoked tuna at the farmers market. I break it into chunks and toss it with cooked pasta, lemon olive oil (or olive oil and some lemon juice) and seasonings (salt, pepper, chili flake, etc.). The simple prep lets the beautiful tuna stand out.

This is how I generally use tuna in pasta. Lemon is essential, and I find that chili pepper flakes are surprisingly good with tuna. The only thing I'd add is a green herb, usually parsley.

This was for fresh tuna but I don't see way canned wouldn't work... Diced tuna into 1/2" cubes. Added some white wine and a hand full of mint to a basic tomato sauce and cooked off the alcohol. Then I simmered the tuna in it until done and finished it with some cream after fishing out the mint. I thick I added that to Orecchiette. This was inspired by something I ate at Angelino's in Sausalito.

Speaking of green herbs, I never thought to add mint to a pasta sauce, but this sounds excellent.



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One of my go-to recipes as a (poor) student was along the lines of the following: saute some onion, garlic and maybe celery and carrot in a saucepan. When it's soft, add some canned tomatoes. Allow this to simmer for some time before adding the canned tuna. Allow the sauce to simmer while you prepare the pasta. The sauce can be jacked with spices and herbs if you feel the need to get 'fancy'.

I can't say I've cooked it as often since becoming a full-time worker--I guess I got sick of it--but it still pops on the menu every so often as a cheap and cheerful meal. And that's just it. If I had really good canned tuna I wouldn't cook this.

Too, I figure you've considered salad Nicoise. Combine that tuna with some nice anchovies and olives.


Chris Taylor

Host, eG Forums - ctaylor@egstaff.org

 

I've never met an animal I didn't enjoy with salt and pepper.

Melbourne
Harare, Victoria Falls and some places in between

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Peas really add something to tuna and pasta. Silly little wagon wheels or something similar with crannies hold the peas.


I like to bake nice things. And then I eat them. Then I can bake some more.

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I like the tonnato sauce used for vitello tonnato (tuna, capers, lemony mayonnaise and anchovies) to sauce pasta. As a variation on that theme would be tuna with capers, lemon juice and grated peel, black olives, parsley and cream or creme fraiche.

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There was a recipe somewhat like yours in the 1950's Adventures in Wine Cookery by California Winemakers called Tuna-like-beef Casserole. You add tuna to a hearty basil/garlic tomato sauce, then layer the sauce with bowtie pasta and cooked spinach, sprinkling with parmesan as you layer. Bake it until bubbly and crusted. Kind of a mock ravioli, and very good.


eGullet member #80.

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Just the thought of hot tuna!!! Yuck!

Sashimi!!!! Yes!

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So many great ideas! Thanks guys. That tonnata sauce sounds so good. I'm partial to lemon and capersbalways

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there is a Marcella Hazan recipe of Pasta with uncooked tuna sauce. no one knows it is canned tuna when they taste it

combine in serving bowl

1 can tuna drained

3 large cloves finely chopped garlic

2tbl softened butter

1/2C freshly grated parmesan plus more for the table

1 whole raw egg

1/2C heavy cream

1/2C chopped italian parsley

salt and freshly ground pepper

fork tuna and mix all remaining ingredients until incorporated.

Cook spaghetti save some pasta water drain and add to the tuna sauce along with 1/4C-1/2C of the pasta water mix together

it is a great recipe...

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If you have really good quality tuna, including belly, then I'd use the simpler Marcella Hazan recipe.

All the other ingredients must be of the best quality too - the olive oil, tomatoes and butter.

4 tbs olive oil

1/2 tsp garlic chopped very fine

1 1/2 cups tomatoes (I use the Danicoop San Marzanos, if you have fresh where you are, even better)

12 oz. tuna packed in olive oil

salt

fresh ground black pepper

1 tbs butter

1 lb dry pasta

3 tbs fresh chopped flat-leaf parsley

I squeeze all the juice out of the tomatoes and remove, and crush the tomatoes in my hands.

Saute the garlic in the olive oil over medium heat until it turns pale gold, add the tomatoes, stir to coat well, and simmer till the oil floats free from the tomatoes.

Drain the tuna, crumble it and add it, mixing thoroughly. Taste and add salt if necessary, along with freshly ground pepper, and the tbs of butter.

Toss with the cooked drained pasta.

Marcella recommends penne or rigatoni, but I find this goes well with just about anything.

[edit: the chopped parsley goes on the tossed pasta as a garnish before going to the table. there is no cheese on this pasta.]


Edited by patrickamory (log)

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I like canned tuna with sauteed garlic, black olives, San Marzano canned tomatoes, dry white wine, basil, and mint, tossed with medium shell pasta.


Edited by merstar (log)

There's nothing better than a good friend, except a good friend with CHOCOLATE.

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