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Partially dehydrating food to deep-fry


Franci
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I'm thinking of taking more advantage of my dehydrator. What food do you think would benefit most from being slightly dehydrated before frying? How much would you dehydrate from initial weight? Which temperatures are more appropriate for different food (higher for meats less for vegetables)?

Things that come to mind first are: fish and vegetables.

I generally dehydrate meat at 70 C (to make jerkies), would that be appropriate also for fish for deep-frying? Do you think it is worthed it?

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Dehydrating to concentrate flavor or reduce splatter?

Not sure fish, I fry fish and want it moist and succulent.

Maybe tofu/eggplant for me ? I just did chicken feet and let me tell you I wish I had de-hydrated those things a bit, hot oil explosions.. not cool.

Paul

Edited by Paul Bacino (log)

Its good to have Morels

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  • 2 months later...

David Chang of Momofuku fame claims time spent in a dehydrator is essential for perfect fried pork skins aka chicharones.

That's very much true. I'd dehydrate food before deep-frying only if I'm going to puff the stuff. Here's a great text on puffing food.

It took me long time but finally I tried it

puffed pasta.JPG

Not bad. I didn't get an homogeneous result. I'm not sure it's because different moisture content or temperature of the oil. I'm more for the oil, I didn't use a thermometer.

Next question. How would you flavour it so the spices glue to the pasta.

Toss them with a syrup before frying?

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I would imagine that dehydrated items would soak up more oil in the frying?

I'm with Karri on this, for most things. Like french fries, it is the presence of water, which converts to steam in the hot oil, which results in a crispy crust while preventing an oil-soaked and over-cooked potato stick. It looks like the pork skins worked really well, and dehydrating those makes sense, considering the end produce is ideally completely dry. I don't think you want to dehydrate your fish and vegetables, unless you are trying to achieve that fried-pork-skin texture. If you want your fish and vegetables to have a crisp *crust* when fried, that seems to be a different goal than obtaining crispness throughout.

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  • 5 years later...

hi all. I agree that it is essential to cook, dehydrate for around 7 hours at about 170 Fahrenheit, then fry at 350 to get great chicarons.  some pieces of skin take a bit longer depending on their thickness.  I have always found that the key is to remove as much fat off after the pre cook works for great puffiness.  I am going to try the same processs with Brussels sprout leaves.  Any one ever tried to make a Brussels "chicaron"?

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1 hour ago, Nicholas Wilber said:

hi all. I agree that it is essential to cook, dehydrate for around 7 hours at about 170 Fahrenheit, then fry at 350 to get great chicarons.  some pieces of skin take a bit longer depending on their thickness.  I have always found that the key is to remove as much fat off after the pre cook works for great puffiness.  I am going to try the same processs with Brussels sprout leaves.  Any one ever tried to make a Brussels "chicaron"?

No, but I've had them in a wonderful Brussels sprouts dish in a Memphis restaurant; some sprouts were shredded raw, some were sauteed, and some outer leaves deep fried. I don't know what all they did to it, but it was marvelous.

 

Don't ask. Eat it.

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