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Paul Bacino

Za'atar Spice - need recipe

20 posts in this topic

I can't remember where I got this recipe, nor have I made it before, but it was sitting in my recipes directory, so here you go:

1 tablespoon roasted sesame seeds

1/4 cup sumac

2 tablespoons thyme

2 tablespoons marjoram

2 tablespoons oregano

1 teaspoon coarse salt

Grind the sesame seeds in a food processor or with a mortar and pestle. Add the remaining ingredients and mix well.


Edited by KingLear (log)

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whoaaaa, no no no. As an avowed za'tar addict that's definitely not right.

The word za'tar in Arabic refers to thyme as well as the mix, so guess what the dominant ingredient is? Yep.

Also, sesame seeds are always left whole. I would say 1/4 cup thyme and WAY less sumac, like maybe a tablespoon? I dunno, I always buy it re-mixed.

Paul, where do you live? Any vaguely Middle Eastern-themed store should have Za'tar.

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Hassouni,

I was actually thinking I had all the herbs, until Sumac came into the equation . So, I'm going looking for it this weekend, I think I know a store.

Thanks


Its good to have Morels

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Za'atar is super-easy to make at home, and very worthwhile because it's far better fresh (although it does keep for awhile, just slowly loses its 'oomph'). Hit Google or Wikipedia for a recipe.

 

My favorite way to consume za'atar is to put a drizzle of olive oil in a small pan and then brown both sides of a pita in it (adding a weight on the top results in the nicest browning). Then I just sprinkle za'atar over it and cut it in wedges. Nice, simple, tasty and fairly healthy snack.

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Zaatar is wild thyme + Sumac + Toasted sesame seeds.....salt only if the mix is too sour,,,,,,a chef's measure.

 

 

 

 

 

 

_MG_2805%201_zps3b2lm4th.jpg

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Kalustyan's (a spice store in NY) has at least 10 different types of za'atar. Syrian, Lebanese, Jordanian, you get the idea. They all look different, too, so I'm guessing they have different herbs or a different balance of each herb. I often find prepared za'atar to be too salty. Never realized it specifically called for thyme, I always thought the predominant flavor (when it wasn't overwhelmed by salt) was wild oregano/marjoram. Nicolai, your mix looks beautiful.

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I get my za'atar at Kalustyan's, which (I think) also sells all the individual ingredients if you want to make your own.

 

2015_06 Jordanian Za'atar.JPG

 

2015_06 Lebanese Za'atar.JPG

 

2015_06 Syrian Za'atar.JPG

 

I make these by brushing with olive oil, sprinkling with za'atar and salt, and toasting in the Steam Girl.

 

Pita Crisps.JPG

 


Mitch Weinstein aka "weinoo"

mweinstein@eGstaff.org

Tasty Travails - My Blog

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I sourced from amazon because amazon is what I have available.  I chose the za'atar from Palestine because it was free trade and, sorry if I'm being chauvinistic, women owned.  Also because I liked the ingredients: thyme, roasted sesame seeds, "summac", olive oil, sea salt.

 

By the way I love that picture of your bread.

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Zaatar is not only the spice blend, but also the name of the plant that used in it. It's close to oregano and majoran but has some thyme aroma as well. A mix of the three (or even only one of them) will do justice for the spice blend. I like a ratio of 1 cups dried zaatar, 1/4 cup well toasted seassame, 1/3 cup fresh sumac, salt to taste.

The dried herbs flavor stays strong for a long time, but the sumac loses it's sharpness and fruitiness. There are endless variations. An unusual one that I like a lot uses some dry dill in addition to the rest.


Edited by shain (log)

~ Shai N.

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Bumping up this topic: my wife just came back from Israel with a big bag of zaatar... Other than on flat bread or yogurt, how else can I use it?

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7 hours ago, KennethT said:

Bumping up this topic: my wife just came back from Israel with a big bag of zaatar... Other than on flat bread or yogurt, how else can I use it?

Years ago I got a recipe out of Sunset Magazine  for Chicken with Za'atar and Lemon. 

I have prepared it many times and it is fantastic.  I made it for a potluck dinner for my computer club and I think everyone there pulled it up on their devices.

I'll look for the link.

 

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"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett

My blog:Books,Cooks,Gadgets&Gardening

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1 hour ago, andiesenji said:

Years ago I got a recipe out of Sunset Magazine  for Chicken with Za'atar and Lemon. 

I have prepared it many times and it is fantastic.  I made it for a potluck dinner for my computer club and I think everyone there pulled it up on their devices.

I'll look for the link.

 

The recipe looks tasty and simple!

 

http://www.myrecipes.com/recipe/zaatar-lemon-grilled-chicken

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1 hour ago, FrogPrincesse said:

The recipe looks tasty and simple!

 

http://www.myrecipes.com/recipe/zaatar-lemon-grilled-chicken

That's it.

I also used it with other meats.  I used it on turkey legs with a long, slow braise.


Edited by andiesenji (log)
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"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett

My blog:Books,Cooks,Gadgets&Gardening

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Looks great!  Thank you!

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Here are a few of my favorites:

 

Pasta with grilled or stir fried zucchini, lemon peel and zaatar (optional mint).

20170118_150959.jpg

 

Zucchini with a short cooked tomato sauce, onion, garlic, zaatar. Serve with rice or bulgur.

20161028_143625.jpg

 

Roasted butternut and onion with tahini and zaatar (by Ottolenghi)

20160924_151951.jpg

 

Fava beans (dried) / chickpeas / lentils (I like a mix), cooked and served with labneh and topped with grated hard boiled egg, zaatar. Also add some fresh diced tomato, onion and chili.

No pic ):

 

Eggplants, make a slice, drizzle oil, salt and zaatar into their inside, then bake or grill until tender.

20160826_151111.jpg

 

I might also suggest you try my quick zaatar flatbread recipe.

20161111_145500.jpg20170105_130737.jpg

 

Add it to scrambled or fried eggs.

 

As you mentioned, pita bread with zaatar and olive oil is classic (and extra tasty if you bake it yourself, you can use store bought pizza dough).

Another option I like is a thick tomato sauce with zaatar and optional feta.

20160625_142102.jpg20160625_143914.jpg

If using a bought pita, you might try to grill it for extra flavor.

 

 

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~ Shai N.

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Those look wonderful, Shain.

 

I was going through my recipe folder of "MAKE AGAIN!"  things and came across some other things.

I made a dish with sausage and apples - spiced with za'atar and served over noodles, which I marked with 5 exclamation points.

Also "little" meatballs flavored with the spice.

I usually buy one of the mixtures they offer at the middle eastern market here in town but the last batch I got from Nuts.com and I was quite impressed. It is very fresh tasting and has what I consider an excellent ratio of ingredients.

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"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett

My blog:Books,Cooks,Gadgets&Gardening

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We do not usually cook with Zaatar. 

 

The common recipe is chicken coated Zaatar chucked in the oven which I do not like much.

 

The only dish which I favour besides the usual Zaatar and EVOO on a Manoucheh or with Labneh is the Potatoe recipe.

 

It is as simple as good morning:

 

Cut Potatoes in cubes with skin and boil until done.

Chuck in the oven, sprinkle with sea salt and half your Zaatar + EVOO mix and roast to taste.

Remove and mix the second half of Zaatar + EVOO.

Hide somewhere under the table or in the garden and enjoy......with a green salad and some nice cold Chablis.

 

As for the Zaatar mix:

- 1 cup Zaatar

- 1 cup roasted Sesame

-  1/2 cup Sumac

 

No salt or other herbs or anything.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Zaatar_zpsndh5rkil.jpg

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Nigella Lawson roasts chicken with za'atar. It's less of a recipe and more of a method. Judging from the pictures I think a lot more can be done because the chicken skin doesn't seem crispy enough:

 

http://www.food.com/recipe/nigellas-zaatar-chicken-378600

 

She serves it with a fattoush salad. This blog's preparation looks more appealing than the previous link's. I think the chicken should be patted dry before oiling in placing on the spices. i also think they should have more space in the pan instead of being crammed together. Lack of room causes steam, and steam causes rubbery skin:

 

http://www.foodlustpeoplelove.com/2013/08/zaatar-chicken-with-fattoush.html

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