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Pasteurizing Eggs Sous Vide


shar999
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I don't use jumbo eggs, myself, but I believe it wouldn't hurt to cook them longer than two hours.

 

The only anomaly I've run into with pasteurized eggs is that the yolk is somewhat more likely to break when the shell is cracked, compared with raw.  I don't see this as a real problem.  I manage to break the yolk of many a raw egg.

Cooking is cool.  And kitchen gear is even cooler.  -- Chad Ward

 

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should you want to shorten the time for this :

 

consider placing the eggs in warm water that less than 130 for 'a bit' to take off the chill

 

however, I cant say what the total time might be.

 

if its important for health reasons that they be pasteurized, rather than extending refrigerator life

 

dont fiddle

 

remember   after you are done and dry them, the carton you keep them, if its the one that came with those eggs,  in is not in theory pasteurized 

 

should it be contaminated.

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correct.


 


in the long run just put them in the bath as it heats up.


 


I use the CSB  as its right there, and Im only really interested in the yolks for sauce purposes most of the time.


 


if its really important, BB&B sells egg containers that you can clean w hot bleach etc :


 


http://www.bedbathandbeyond.com/store/product/snapware-reg-two-tray-egg-tainer/1015167777?Keyword=egg+containers


 


probably cheaper plastic items at Target and Walmart etc

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One more question, if you can answer. If you use a container like the one you show rotuts, cleaned with bleach etc, how sure it is that the eggs don't get contaminated again, after pasteurization? 

I'm planning to use the eggs for some frozen desserts and tiramisu, where I want to have another option beside pate a bombe and/or a hot meringue.

Edited by Franci (log)
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""  eggs don't get contaminated again, after pasteurization? ""

 

nothing is for sure

 

but most egg contamination is from Salmonella.  its unlikely to live in your refrigerator, etc

 

normal hand washing, routine cleaning would probably be enough,

 

of course, beware of recent eggs and their cartons and well, that chicken you just bought ....

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  • 8 months later...

Last night I pasteurized two eggs for hollandaise, but this time I pasteurized at 57 deg C, since I was cooking a steak at that temperature.  As previously reported the whites were indeed milky but the yolks were perfect for Hollandaise.  At least until I dropped one yolk down the drain.

 

Fortunately it is possible to prepare a superb hollandaise with but one yolk.

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Cooking is cool.  And kitchen gear is even cooler.  -- Chad Ward

 

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  • 1 year later...
58 minutes ago, JoNorvelleWalker said:

Sounds like much more work and mess to me.

 

 

If you're doing it for something you plan to use separated eggs in anyway, and you put the eggs in a baggie either way, it seems like it is just the order of mess making that changes, not the mess?

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The difference is in one case you have pasteurized eggs slopped all over your counter.  In the other case you have unpasteurized eggs slopped all over your counter.

 

Also consider that eggs come in nifty little sealed containers.  If you break and separate the eggs first you have to deal with bagging the mess.  Compare a simple inexpensive sandwich bag to a vacuum bag.

 

But I may be too negative.  Try the experiment and report back.

 

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Cooking is cool.  And kitchen gear is even cooler.  -- Chad Ward

 

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If saving time is in an issue, you can just make the hollandaise sous-vide with plain eggs, and it will pasteurize while cooking. The cooking step takes about 30 minutes; at 65°C eggs will be pasteurized in about 10 mins. I haven't found any downsides to this approach.

Notes from the underbelly

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Ive pasteurized eggs in the past in a water bath, lets say 130.1

 

Ive noticed that as the eggs warm up . there are tinny bubbles on the various surfaces.

 

the I rapidly chill and dray and refrigerate.

 

as the eggs cool in the cold water , Im betting its possible that water re-enters the egg.   I have not done the studies where I weight the egg etc

 

and figure this out.  Im not immune compromised  

 

if this indeed happens and an immune compromised host is where these eggs might go in the future :

 

consider a zip-bag  with water in it  ( whicch also becomes pasteurized ) the a cold ice bath with those eggs still sealed in that same bag

 

into cold water.  if water indeed seeps back into the egg  ( and I do think a little does )  it will come from the sealed bag w some pasteurized water

 

still in it.

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40 minutes ago, rotuts said:

Ive pasteurized eggs in the past in a water bath, lets say 130.1

 

Ive noticed that as the eggs warm up . there are tinny bubbles on the various surfaces.

 

the I rapidly chill and dray and refrigerate.

 

as the eggs cool in the cold water , Im betting its possible that water re-enters the egg.   I have not done the studies where I weight the egg etc

 

and figure this out.  Im not immune compromised  

 

if this indeed happens and an immune compromised host is where these eggs might go in the future :

 

consider a zip-bag  with water in it  ( whicch also becomes pasteurized ) the a cold ice bath with those eggs still sealed in that same bag

 

into cold water.  if water indeed seeps back into the egg  ( and I do think a little does )  it will come from the sealed bag w some pasteurized water

 

still in it.

 

Interesting thought. That would be another reason to perhaps separate the eggs first if making something that requires just yolks or whites, and pasturize in a small baggie rather than in the shell. That would be less effective for doing a bunch of eggs ahread of time to keep in the fridge, though.

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7 hours ago, rotuts said:

Ive pasteurized eggs in the past in a water bath, lets say 130.1

 

Ive noticed that as the eggs warm up . there are tinny bubbles on the various surfaces.

 

the I rapidly chill and dray and refrigerate.

 

as the eggs cool in the cold water , Im betting its possible that water re-enters the egg.   I have not done the studies where I weight the egg etc

 

and figure this out.  Im not immune compromised  

 

if this indeed happens and an immune compromised host is where these eggs might go in the future :

 

consider a zip-bag  with water in it  ( whicch also becomes pasteurized ) the a cold ice bath with those eggs still sealed in that same bag

 

into cold water.  if water indeed seeps back into the egg  ( and I do think a little does )  it will come from the sealed bag w some pasteurized water

 

still in it.

 

I chill my pasteurized eggs in the ice bath still in their knotted sandwich bags.  I've kept them this way in the refrigerator for a couple weeks....or more.

 

Cooking is cool.  And kitchen gear is even cooler.  -- Chad Ward

 

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  • 3 months later...

here are some times and temps :

 

https://thatothercookingblog.com/2013/07/16/pasteurizing-eggs-or-mayo-at-home-sous-vide-134-6-f-for-2hr/

 

is it important to keep the yolks separate ? the only real advantage  is that is you only want to use one yolk and open the bag , in theory the remainder are no longer pasteurized.

 

PE.jpg.bd64397628adef0fc39657dd4dc4dd2c.jpg

Edited by rotuts (log)
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2 hours ago, rotuts said:

here are some times and temps :

 

https://thatothercookingblog.com/2013/07/16/pasteurizing-eggs-or-mayo-at-home-sous-vide-134-6-f-for-2hr/

 

is it important to keep the yolks separate ? the only real advantage  is that is you only want to use one yolk and open the bag , in theory the remainder are no longer pasteurized.

 

PE.jpg.bd64397628adef0fc39657dd4dc4dd2c.jpg

 

 

Thank you Rotuts. I have a lot of yolks left over at work from one of my cakes. Finally I am coming out with a new product where I can use yolks and in decent quantities, so to eliminate waist. I am looking for the less painful  and economical way to pasteurize the yolk to use in a product that doesn't require cooking. So, my main objective is pasteurization. I am afraid though, for what I read on line, that I will need a permit to use sous vide, even if by just water displacement. I am going to ask on the pastry forum. Thanks! 

Edited by Franci (log)
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Good Luck !

 

its wise to be on the safe side under those circumstances, with every detail.

 

business use and home use  might have little in common in the long run.

Edited by rotuts (log)
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  • 1 year later...

Bumping this up to get the group's opinion on how to accomplish something. Last year in NOLA, I treated myself to breakfast at Brennan's, which has two of my very favorite breakfast dishes in the world: egg yolk tartare and eggs hussarde. I was talking with the waiter about how they achieved the perfect texture for the egg yolks in the tartare dish; it's exactly what you get in the ideal over-easy or lightly poached egg. Perfectly runny. No solids at all. That good "done" taste and velvety texture that lets you know it's cooked enough. 

 

I'm thinking through how to accomplish this. The yolks tartare are not served whole; they're as if one just poured them out on the plate. I did not ask, and should have, whether they are cooked whole, or whether they're lightly beaten and then sous vided.

 

I'm thinking if I were to lightly beat the egg yolks, then pour them into a bag, and sous vide, I'd get the effect I want. What would be the time and temp y'all would suggest for this? I'll save the whites for another day.

 

The yolks tartare are pooled in a salad plate at Brennan's, with some grilled shrimp circling a tower of crispy fried sweet potato strands in the center. It's insufferably good.

Don't ask. Eat it.

www.kayatthekeyboard.wordpress.com

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