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Box and Other Hand-held Graters


Paul Bacino
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I have the older Cuisipro one (w/o the ridge/no-stick sides). Works well for most things, but I haven't compared it to anything else. The only problem is that sharp blades are more painful on your knuckles.

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I also have the OXO box grater with the measure box at the bottom and it works just fine. I have a larger one made by Winco with straight sides that I use for grating where I need more capacity. I think I bought it at the kitchen outlet store at the factory outlet mall.

Do NOT get the Microplane box grater - I bought one last year and returned it after a couple of weeks as the plastic housing cracked and it had not been near the dishwasher.

I think I used it three or four times, cleaned and dried it immediately after use and hung it up by itself.

Then I needed to grate just one carrot and as I got half-way through it, the side on which I was grating broke on one side and pivoted inside the "box" and I cut my hand on the ragged plastic at the edge.

It's a good idea and the blades are sharp but the plastic housing is cheap and apparently degrades rapidly.

Edited by andiesenji (log)

"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett

 

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My Oxo does great, I especially like the snap on measure box for the bottom if I am shredding small amounts. It even has a lid for the measure box. The only drawback is that you still need to set it on a plate or something to catch the excess, but I think that's the same for any box grater.

"...which usually means underflavored, undersalted modern French cooking hidden under edible flowers and Mexican fruits."

- Jeffrey Steingarten, in reference to "California Cuisine".

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CuisiPro.

get rid of that stupid plastic bottom.

under stand this re MicoPlane. if you push into the tines rather than grate down you might really damage your 'tissue' ie your your fingers.

MicroPlane was initially for Wood.

its razor sharp. It should not be use for 1 ) children 2) any of us that have enjoyed a touch of a 'Persona beverage'

Pam it if you use stick-ey cheeze

be very very carefull with it.

on the other hand, it your have One Of Those coupons fropm BB&Beyond and cant get the Cuuisi

the Oxo will serve you very very well.

Happy Cooking!

Edited by rotuts (log)
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I have this Kitchenaid one which has a container it can sit on to contain whatever you grate (and it also has a lid for that container, so you can store extras in the fridge). The whole thing works really well -- at the bottom it has a ring of rubber which helps keep it stable when using it on a cutting board...

http://www.amazon.com/KitchenAid-KG300-Box-Grater-Black/dp/B0000655YB

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I've had the Microplane box grater for around a year now, and I haven't had any problems with it. I like that it has one side that slides out, making it easier to clean. I'd recommend it.

I'm glad you have a good one David. The one I had was purchased at Crate & Barrel, had the Microplane name on the metal and the grating surfaces themselves were excellent. It was the housing that was a problem. The store employee mentioned that although it stated it was dishwasher safe, it would be better to wash it by hand and so I did.

I don't know if there was one or more batches of the plastic that were not up to par but I am not the only one who has had this happen.

I love my Microplanes and have just about every type they make. This one was for me a bust.

"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett

 

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very interesting.

My 'microplane' box says Cuisipro on it and Ive had it for about 10 years.

i dont use the plastic bottom, and for its uses as long as you understand its dangers works well

extreeeemly sharp.

i also a fan of Oxo, there stuff works very well for what I have.

use some lube on either and grate down not towards the grates.

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CuisiPro.

get rid of that stupid plastic bottom.

I had a Cuisipro and really liked it at first (including the plastic bottom piece, which made it easier to keep the cheese contained and move it to where I needed it). But it cracked, because the housing for the blades was made of plastic, and then the bottom wouldn't stay locked in place, and the cracks just kept getting bigger.

Now I have an Oxo, which I really like.

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this is sort of interesting. A major design change.

the older one I have has those hard plastic sides. Im betting people used to bang in on the side to loosen the cheezzeee bits left inside, hence the cracking.

the newer design looks all metal.

you wont go wrong with either, but the cuisi might be more lethal.

still Id get rid of the bottom and use a 'spray' esp. for Mozzarell

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  • 1 year later...

How mundane a topic, however, I have learned here that there are substantial differences in many run-of-the-mill kitchen tools and gadgets, so why not box graters? My old grater has seen better days, and I'm not sure how good it was to begin with. So, what do you look for in a box grater, and what suggestions might you have to replace my old one? It'll be used mostly for cheese and vegetables (including squash and root vegetables), maybe ginger. Thanks!

Edited by Shel_B (log)
  • Like 1

 ... Shel


 

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Here's another vote for the OXO.

But...

Ours is from a restaurant supply store, it is about ten years old, still very sharp, which makes quick work for the Tillamook that we grate weekly. It is satinless, a bit on the larger side so grating is quick work. It was about ten dollars.

I'd like to know if yours has any sort of a brand name on it.

I don't understand why rappers have to hunch over while they stomp around the stage hollering.  It hurts my back to watch them. On the other hand, I've been thinking that perhaps I should start a rap group here at the Old Folks' Home.  Most of us already walk like that.

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How mundane a topic, however, I have learned here that there are substantial differences in many run-of-the-mill kitchen tools and gadgets, so why not box graters? My old grater has seen better days, and I'm not sure how good it was to begin with. So, what do you look for in a box grater, and what suggestions might you have to replace my old one? It'll be used mostly for cheese and vegetables (including squash and root vegetables), maybe ginger. Thanks!

I would like some type of 1) rubber base, helps sliding around. 2 ) Wide grating surface 3) Variable size 4) Decent handle to hold

it 5) Good ergonolmics 6) Sharp

I kinda like the grater handle in the last post except is a one size unit!!

Paul

How mundane a topic, however, I have learned here that there are substantial differences in many run-of-the-mill kitchen tools and gadgets, so why not box graters? My old grater has seen better days, and I'm not sure how good it was to begin with. So, what do you look for in a box grater, and what suggestions might you have to replace my old one? It'll be used mostly for cheese and vegetables (including squash and root vegetables), maybe ginger. Thanks!

Edited by Paul Bacino (log)

Its good to have Morels

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