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Emily_R

Your best use of Mexican Chorizo

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Hey all --

I've long been a huge fan of Spanish Chorizo, but just recently bought 1/2 a pound of what is supposed to be some delicious Mexican Chorizo. I'm wondering what your recommendations are for how I should use it? I've been very tempted by the Tinga recipe on Homesick Texan's blog - Tinga Recipe Here

Any other tried-and-true recipes to share?

Emily

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I like a simple piece of chorizo on a wooden skewer, over charcoal, with slits cut into the sausage to let a bit of the fat out. This can also be done on a griddle, and it's extremely good - it really allows the rich flavour of the chorizo to shine.


Elizabeth Campbell, baking 10,000 feet up at 1° South latitude.

My eG Food Blog (2011)My eG Foodblog (2012)

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I love both kinds.

I use the Mex on top of eggs ( ranchero-ish ) of all shapes: scrambled. over easy etc.

I also crumble it in of all things, Caesar-ish salad. It good on top of Mex food, ie beans.

when you look at your label, be aware there are at least two kinds: Dirt Cheap and Cheap. the DC on the label has 'lymph nodes' on the list fairly high up. What else are you going to do with Pig Lymph Nodes?

I avoid these as i avoid eating another animals immune system. bet they have them in 'Hot Dogs'

any way look carefully at the label and decide. Mex has more vinigar and more 'chili' than spanish which has smoked spanish paprika.

you can get now terrific spanish chorizo in the USofA. From Spain ( la tienda ) and from LA where they are made and just as good:

http://www.donajuana.com/frame.html

I lived in Spain for two years and both places have very fine products.

Enjoy!

PS Trader Joe's has a vegetarian version of the Mex Chor. and its quite good. Sorry, no lymph nodes!

:huh:


Edited by rotuts (log)

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forgot: crisped up on 'tomato salad' ie slices of tomato/mozza/basil/Chorizo. on a bed of spinach.

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Chorizo is a staple in our house.

Most weekend mornings, like many Texans, we have breakfast tacos/burritos. You can make these with practically anything, but chorizo is a very common ingredient. As are potatoes. So, to that end, I always have a package of frozen French fries in the freezer. To make our family's preferred breakfast tacos, I start by browning some chorizo in a skillet. Then add a little chopped onion and saute. Pour off the extra grease.

Take a handful of the frozen french fries and chop them. Add them to the skillet and stir for a couple of minutes (because those frozen french fries are partially cooked before they are packaged, all you have to do is basically heat them up). Then beat a couple of eggs with some cream or water, pour them into the skillet and scramble. Take your tortillas (flour or corn, whichever you prefer) and heat them a few minutes on a comal or other skillet. To serve, put some of the egg/potato/chorizo mixture into the tortilla. Add salsa or chiles or a sprinkle of grated cheese, or whatever to taste, and eat with some additional salsa alongside. You see these made with any or all of the following: beans, ham, bacon, cheese, jalapenos, whatever.

Some folks put chorizo into their Charro Beans. But many others, myself included, do not. I got my recipe from a restaurant in Nuevo Progreso, Tamaulipas. This restaurant is very famous for their Charro Beans. Everybody says that this restaurant's Charro Beans are the best in all of Northern Mexico. They do not put chorizo into their Charro Beans, so I don't either. I use some chopped pork butt and a little bacon. But some other people do add chorizo, so if you're looking for a way to use up your chorizo, consider browning it and adding it to a pot of beans.

Here's a Tex/Mex dip with chorizo:

Carnes con Queso

1 lb ground beef

1 lb chorizo (Mexican-style)

1 white or yellow onion, chopped

1 15-16oz can whole tomatoes, drained

1 2-lb box Velveeta

chopped jalapenos to taste (I used the canned or jarred pickled jalapenos, "en escabeche"; often you can find them sliced, for nachos)

In a large skillet brown the meats. Drain well. Either remove the meat from the skillet and set aside, or make the sauce in a separate pan.

Coarsely chop the tomatoes and chunk the Velveeta and place in a pan along with the onions and chiles and cook slowly, simmering, until Velveeta is melted and smooth.

Stir in the meats and serve hot with tortilla chips.

And of course, there's Queso Fundido (or Queso Flameado, whichever you prefer).

My recipe is in RecipeGullet: Queso Fundido con Chorizo y Hongos


Edited by Jaymes (log)

I don't understand why rappers have to hunch over while they stomp around the stage hollering.  It hurts my back to watch them. On the other hand, I've been thinking that perhaps I should start a rap group here at the Old Folks' Home.  Most of us already walk like that.

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FYI... in Mexico the Chorizo NEVER has lymph nodes in it... it is a North of the Border invention to hit unrealistically low price points ($1 a pound)... I would not recommend it.

Most Mexican markets so the higher quality product in bulk.

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I substituted chorizo for some of the ground beef in a chili recipe once and never looked back.


True rye and true bourbon wake delight like any great wine...dignify man as possessing a palate that responds to them and ennoble his soul as shimmering with the response.

DeVoto, The Hour

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Chorizo is a staple in our house.

And of course, there's Queso Fundido (or Queso Flameado, whichever you prefer).

Brilliant idea about using frozen French Fries. I love it.

Loved your Queso Fundido recipe. Makes me think about Poutine. :laugh:


Darienne

learn, learn, learn...

Cheers & Chocolates

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I love mussels braised in tomato and chorizo, like this. OK, that uses Spanish (we don't really get Mexican chorizo in Australia) but I imagine Mexican would work just fine.

In fact, I think I'll make this dish for dinner tonight. Thanks for the idea!


Edited by rarerollingobject (log)

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I like it as a snack/appetizer based on something we observed in Ensenada many years ago. The ladies at the local diner were snacking on something in between performing their cooking and serving. We asked what it was. They fried out the chorizo so that most of the fat had rendered (possibly reserved like bacon grease for other uses), and it was crumbly. They were scooping it up with freshly fried tortilla chips. They shared :smile: A new food love was born. Some avocado just roughly mashed with lime juice adds a simple contrast. We have requested it in the US and after a tilt of the head and a questioning look from the server, were obliged. I get mine locally made.

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For those outside the range of Mex chorizo...it is very different from the Spanish. Lots of chile and garlic in a loose sausage. Generally strong flavored it overwhelms subtle food, but compliments sweet stuff like corn.

I love it in a quesadilla.


Edited by gfweb (log)

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Mexican chorizo is vinager cured with ground red chili. Very different, as stated above, then Spanish chorizo.


The Philip Mahl Community teaching kitchen is now open. Check it out. "Philip Mahl Memorial Kitchen" on Facebook. Website coming soon.

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I've made our own chorizo back home and we liked it. I have no idea of what it is supposed to taste like so I have nothing to compare it against. Can't provide the source because the recipe and cookbook title is at home.

I use it in recipes as instructed. That's about it. I'll learn more as I go along. :wink:


Darienne

learn, learn, learn...

Cheers & Chocolates

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I love it in frittata, browned with potatos, black beans, goat cheese, topped with salsa and avocado. A brunch fit for the gods. One of our local organic farmers makes it, and I buy it religiously; I also buy the "real thing" from one or another of the plethoras of Mexican tiendas here in town.


Don't ask. Eat it.

www.kayatthekeyboard.wordpress.com

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Hi everyone -

Just wanted to come back and thank you all for the suggestions! I was very tempted by all the chorizo + egg ideas and the chorizo + cheese ideas... But in the end I decided to try that Tinga recipe I linked to, and it was absolutely delicious. We had it over tostadas, with avocado, lime, and cilantro as garnishes. A huge hit. For what its worth, I didn't brine the pork as specified in the recipe, and it was totally delicious -- given that the pork is shredded in with the chorizo and cooked in sauce, its hard for me to imagine brining would make much of a difference.

Emily

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Several years ago, I tossed a few links of chorizo on the grill. Unfortunately, the casings were made of plastic. They melted almost immediately and made a giant freakin mess outta my Weber.

Lesson learned I guess.


That's the thing about opposum inerds, they's just as tasty the next day.

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Its Important to take the Mex out of the 'casing'

It works a lot better it your saute it then crumble it over what you plan to eat.

I sure hope someone might try the TraderJoes Veg ( :laugh: ) mex chorizo its quite good!

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I like it as a snack/appetizer based on something we observed in Ensenada many years ago. The ladies at the local diner were snacking on something in between performing their cooking and serving. We asked what it was. They fried out the chorizo so that most of the fat had rendered (possibly reserved like bacon grease for other uses), and it was crumbly. They were scooping it up with freshly fried tortilla chips. They shared :smile: A new food love was born. Some avocado just roughly mashed with lime juice adds a simple contrast. We have requested it in the US and after a tilt of the head and a questioning look from the server, were obliged. I get mine locally made.

The very first time I "cooked" (that I can remember)... I was about 10, home alone & hungry... I took one of my mom's copper skillets from its decorative perch on the dining room wall, a beautiful hand made specimen from Michoacan... fried up the chorizo until it was crispy as you mention... then I warmed up corn tortillas using the rendered oil & made folded tacos with a triangle of Kraft American Singles that I allowed to melt into the Chorizo

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Mexican chorizo is vinager cured with ground red chili. Very different, as stated above, then Spanish chorizo.

I just wanted to point out that not all Mexican Chorizo is "Mexican Chorizo" meaning throughout Mexico there are regional styles of Chorizo that very quite a bit from what is known in the U.S.... in some places it is alot like Spanish chorizo but with spicy chiles instead of mild chiles (Paprika etc.,).. aged, eaten sliced etc.,... some like Oaxacan chorizo that is tied with corn husks falls a bit more on the "Mexican Chorizo" side of the continuum in that it is crumbly... however it is heavy on cinnamon & cloves, uses darker milder chiles, it is light on Mex Oregano, much drier than the mainstream... and usually stewed * or grilled instead of pan fried into loose bits.

* One of the most delicious Oaxacan breakfasts is "Salsa de Chorizo" or "Salsa de Huevo"... a Oaxacan chorizo is stewed in a basic tomato caldillo... then sauce & chorizo are served as a "mirror" for soft fried eggs, sauteed Nopales & boiled black beans.


Edited by EatNopales (log)

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I took one of my mom's copper skillets from its decorative perch on the dining room wall, a beautiful hand made specimen from Michoacan...

Santa Clara del Cobre? I love that place.


I don't understand why rappers have to hunch over while they stomp around the stage hollering.  It hurts my back to watch them. On the other hand, I've been thinking that perhaps I should start a rap group here at the Old Folks' Home.  Most of us already walk like that.

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I took one of my mom's copper skillets from its decorative perch on the dining room wall, a beautiful hand made specimen from Michoacan...

Santa Clara del Cobre? I love that place.

Si

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My recommendation is, if it's in plastic, don't buy it as it will probably be just a ball of red grease. I get it at a Mexican meat counter where it's made in shop.

Crumble it up and cook with potato and onion and scramble in a couple 0f eggs

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Homemade, fried with a bit of diced onion and red serrano, on a yellow corn tortilla that's been heated in the chorizo's drippings and filled with Chihuahua cheese. Serve with a halved lime.

Jan182012010_cr.jpg


This is my skillet. There are many like it, but this one is mine. My skillet is my best friend. It is my life. I must master it, as I must master my life. Without me my skillet is useless. Without my skillet, I am useless. I must season my skillet well. I will. Before God I swear this creed. My skillet and myself are the makers of my meal. We are the masters of our kitchen. So be it, until there are no ingredients, but dinner. Amen.

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