Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create an account.

Emily_R

Your best use of Mexican Chorizo

Recommended Posts

Yes!

Sent from my Droid using Tapatalk

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My recommendation is, if it's in plastic, don't buy it as it will probably be just a ball of red grease. I get it at a Mexican meat counter where it's made in shop.

Crumble it up and cook with potato and onion and scramble in a couple 0f eggs

That was my experience. Not a very good ball of red grease either. In Kansas City, KS Krizman's House of Sausage makes a pretty good chorizo. I have learned my lesson.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Mexican Chorizo is one of the easiest sausages to make at home, too: I highly recommend it. You can even use a food processor to "grind" the pork if you don't have a meat grinder; the texture is not quite the same, but it still works. And then you know what's in it (and what's not).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Dakki- that does look outstanding! Very similar to one of our favorite taco places here in KC, they take it to a crazy level and throw a fried egg on top.

We had some leftover Mexican chorizo in the fridge after our NYE party, and my wife added mixed it in w/the burger meat one night. I am definitely a fan, nice addition.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

015.JPG

Just for the sake of being different, I fried it up in links for these huevos rancheros. I like the scrambled/crumbled better, I think.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If you're in the bay area, the Fatted Calf makes really good chorizo. It's especially amazing how good it is considering how well they understand the European tradition. When Diana Kennedy was here, they made her Oaxacan version for her and she seemed to like it a lot. I loved it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Has anyone tried making a pasta sauce with it?

Hi Chris

Macarrones* con Chorizo is a fairly traditional dish in Central Mexico (Jalisco, Guanajuato, Quertaro etc.,). Penne Pasta tossed with sauteed, pan fried Chorizo & sauced with Tomato (fresh tomatoes, par boiled, peeled, pureed with roasted garlic, salt)... the dish is dressed with Crema, Cotija, Pickled Vegetables & typically a side of Ensalada Verde (key lime macerated onions tossed with cilantro, fresh jalapenos & Orejona lettuce - a broad, short variety of Romaine)

* Macarrones.. much to the annoyance of Italians everywhere, hollow pastas in Mexico are generically referred to as Macarrones

Other variants of a similar dish is to toss the pasta with Picadillo (Ground Beef sauteed with Onions, Carrots & Peas) instead of Chorizo

In Mexico City, Fideos Secos (Dry Vermicelli) is a very popular dish making regular appearances in most homes, cantinas & neighborhood fondas here is a representative recipe from Patricia Jinich published in the Washington Post:

http://projects.washingtonpost.com/recipes/2010/01/13/mexican-style-pasta-tomato-sauce-and-chorizo/

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I remember my mom buying fresh chorizo in natural casings from a Mexican butcher at an Persian market in Westwood then hanging it in the laundry room for at least a few days and up to a week IIRC. Really good.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Has anyone tried making a pasta sauce with it?

Macarrones* con Chorizo is a fairly traditional dish in Central Mexico (Jalisco, Guanajuato, Quertaro etc.,). Penne Pasta tossed with sauteed, pan fried Chorizo & sauced with Tomato (fresh tomatoes, par boiled, peeled, pureed with roasted garlic, salt)... the dish is dressed with Crema, Cotija, Pickled Vegetables & typically a side of Ensalada Verde (key lime macerated onions tossed with cilantro, fresh jalapenos & Orejona lettuce - a broad, short variety of Romaine)

You inspired me!

Made rigatoni and the sauce was chorizo with canned tomotoes (whole peeled),oregano indio, and cotija cheese. I didn't bother with the crema but I did used my homemade chipotle en vinagre (made with banana vinegar and piloncillo) for the pickled vegetable. It was incredible.

Thanks for the inspiration.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Oh, I forgot to add that I used a big handful of quelites I found at the flea market this last weekend.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

  • Similar Content

    • By gulfporter
      Chiles en Nogada are traditionally served only for Mexican Independence Day (16 de Septiembre).  Every household and restaurant have their own version.  In years past we have eaten as many as 12 different versions in the course of the week long celebration.   Certain things about it never change: always poblanos, walnuts, pomegranate seeds and dried fruit (though the types of dried and fresh fruit vary as does the ratio of fruit to meat).  And the cream sauce is always room temperature, never heated.  
       
      Not only is it a tasty dish, it is about the prettiest meal ever put on a plate.  

       
      I have made them at home (but not for several years).   Rick Bayless's recipe is the one I used.  
      http://www.rickbayless.com/recipe/pork-and-fruit-stuffed-chiles-in-white-walnut-sauce/
       
      The history of the dish is one of creating a festive dish on the spur of the moment with limited ingredients. 
      https://www.tripsavvy.com/chiles-en-nogada-1588803
       
       
       
       
    • By Kasia
      My quesadilla
       
      Today I would like to share with you the recipe for a dish which meets holiday requirements. It is easy, and it doesn't need sophisticated ingredients or an oven. A frying pan is enough. Quesadilla, the dish in question, is a tortilla with melted cheese. The rest of the ingredients you choose at your discretion. Red beans, pepper, chorizo or fried meat all work brilliantly. I added fried pieces of turkey leg. Thanks to this, my dish could be a holiday dinner.

      Ingredients (for 2 people)
      4 tortillas
      300g of turkey leg
      half a chili pepper
      half an onion
      1 clove of garlic
      2 tablespoons of oil
      200g of tinned sweetcorn
      200g of tinned red beans
      fresh pepper
      200g of mozzarella cheese
      salt and pepper

      Cube the meat. Fry the diced onion, garlic and chili pepper in oil. Add the spiced-up-with-salt-and-pepper meat and fry on a low heat until the meat is soft. Cube the pepper. Drain the sweetcorn and red beans and slice the mozzarella cheese. Put the tortilla into a dry, heated pan. Arrange the meat, sweetcorn and red beans on it. Cover with the slices of the mozzarella cheese and the second tortilla. Fry on a low heat for a while. Turn it and fry a bit more until the cheese has melted. Put it on a plate and cut it into triangles.

      Enjoy your meal!
       
       
       

    • By MelissaH
      I was catching up on my blog reading, and hit a post about icebox cakes. I've only ever made one icebox cake in my life, and it was delicious, using the classic chocolate wafers and whipped cream but flavored with Red Bird peppermint puffs. (I got the recipe from an article about the company that makes the candy.) Anyway, while the blog post itself was interesting, the first comment (at least as I currently see it) caught my attention, because it described a Mexican icebox cake that looked very different to me because it didn't use whipped cream. The commenter called this icebox cake a carlota de limón, and described it as being made from maria cookies, lime juice, and sweetened condensed milk. I adore limes!
       
      So...I can find recipes on line, but has anyone made this cake before? Do you have a tried-and-true recipe that you'd be willing to share? Please?
       
      Thanks!
    • By SNewman004
      Thinking about putting a chorizo burger on the menu. It would most likely be a 50/50 blend of chorizo and ground chuck. I'm thinking this means I can't do a mid rare burger? Anyone have any experience with this?
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×